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Question #: 13659

Question: vertical laser machine resolution ppi

Current Solution

The Vertical Laser XL can have various PPI setting depending on your application and material that you are cutting.

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Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • I have a double engrave in y_swing mode in my vertical laser machine

    When engraving with the vertical laser, use unilateral movement for the y-swing. Unilateral engraving will allow the firing on the laser in one direction.

    Click the link to respond:
    I have a double engrave in y_swing mode in my vertical laser machine

  • What are some good ways to control the vertical laser from a Linux machine?

    There really isn't any good way to use Linux when using a traditional Laser Controller. If LaserCAD worked under the Linux OS, then that would work.

    Would you like to know an alternative to use Linux using maybe LinuxCNC? There are ways to do it, but you will find yourself deep in g-code and out of the box wiring configurations, most likely.

    Alternatively, you can create a dual boot scenario and put Window on the other part of the hard drive. This way, you would be able to run LaserCAD.

    You can also "attempt" to use LaserCAD in the wine environment, but I have a feeling that will probably not work.

    Additional Information:
    We're a small family-owned electronics and hardware manufacturer, using LinuxCNC already for milling. Dual-boot into Windows isn't a sensible option -- it would greatly reduce the utility of the machine. I have more information about our use case in https://buildyourcnc.com/FAQ/13985.

    Additional Information:
    Ok, fair enough. Then let's get into the details on how you can use LinuxCNC to operate a Laser machine.

    Do you have an idea what controller you will be using? Parallel?

    Additional Information:
    My first inclination was to use LinuCNC with the parallel interface board. Of that's the answer, then we might want to just add to the LinuxCNC discussion that's starting to firm up at https://buildyourcnc.com/FAQ/13985 rather than duplicate the information here.

    I'm open to other alternatives and am happy to hack; we make PCBs and cable harnesses as a business, so that's not a limitation either. One answer might be to use one of the open source controllers that are starting to show up.

    Additional Information:
    My turn for phone typos. ;-) I meant to say "If that's the answer, then..."

    Additional Information:
    I've started a forum topic about this at http://www.buildyourtools.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=8412&start=0

    Additional Information:
    Good idea. Thanks.

    When a direct solution is realized on buildyourtools, I will post it here.

    Click the link to respond:
    What are some good ways to control the vertical laser from a Linux machine?

  • Lasercad resolution ppi

    The resolution of PPI (Pulses Per Inch or Pulses/Inch) for any laser is the velocity (feedrate) of the machine's head and the number of pulses that are generated during this process. Therefore, any number of PPI resolution can be achieved, so you have many options. The slower the feedrate and higher the pulses per second will yield a high PPI. Fast feedrate with low pulses per second will yield low PPI.

    Additional Information:

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    Lasercad resolution ppi

  • WHAT ARE THE SHIPPING DIMENSIONS FOR VERTICAL LASER

    Shipping crate size 121" X 36" X 92"

    Weight 511 LBS

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    WHAT ARE THE SHIPPING DIMENSIONS FOR VERTICAL LASER

  • WHAT IS SHIPPING DIMENSIONS AND WEIGHT FOR THE VERTICAL LASER.

    Shipping crate size 121" X 36" X 92"

    Weight 511 LBS

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    WHAT IS SHIPPING DIMENSIONS AND WEIGHT FOR THE VERTICAL LASER.

  • MY LASER MACHINE VERTICAL DOES NOT ACTIVATE THE LASER TUBE, VERIFY THE POWER SUPPLIES AND THEY ARE WORKING WHICH THE PROBLEM CAN BE

    Same issue here -- TTL output from the AWC708C never seems to be pulled low. Still troubleshooting.

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    MY LASER MACHINE VERTICAL DOES NOT ACTIVATE THE LASER TUBE, VERIFY THE POWER SUPPLIES AND THEY ARE WORKING WHICH THE PROBLEM CAN BE

  • What is the dot resolution (size) of the BlackTooth laser?

    The dot resolution of the blackTooth is a combination of two specifications of the machine:

    - The steps/inch (or steps/mm) which is the resolution but not the dot size
    - The size of the actual dot, which is not specifically related to the resolution.

    The steps per or resolution can actually be a range, since the driver microstepping can be modified.

    A simple formula can be used to determine the resolution:

    step per inch = (motor steps * microstepping) / (travel at one turn of the motor in inches)

    if microstepping is set at 16 (1/16 on the driver) and you are using a pulley that has a pitch of .08 inches and 20 teeth on the drive sprocket

    = (200 steps * 16 microsteps) / (20 teeth * .08 inches)
    = 3200 steps / 1.6 inches
    = 2000 steps per inch

    To increase the resolution, just increase the microsteps on the driver.

    The actual dot size will depend on the lens you are using, the material being lased, the time period that the laser energy is applied to the material, and the focal height of the lens to the work surface material. The energy from the laser will converge to a point and create a dot on the surface (which is different than the kerf of the laser cut into the material).

    The dot will appear in different sizes depending on the material because, say wood, will burn causing a dot that burns the fibers of the wood and spreads a bit. The dot lased on the surface of a plastic, say Plexiglas, the dot will be smaller because the energy is absorbed only at that point, but since Plexiglas is a thermoplastic, a bit of the energy will melt the dot edges depending on the time frame (period) that the energy is applied to the surface.

    The focus of the laser energy from the lens looks like a cone converging to a point, then diverges outward after that point. Depending on the distance from the lens to the surface of the material, the dot will be bigger or smaller. You want to find focal point (where the energy is focused into a point). You can use the technique where you lay a material on a slope and lase that material along the slope to find the sweet spot (dot) and that will be your smallest dot, or kerf location. Remember that the kerf will widen or narrow within the material thickness depending on the focal length lens specification (the cone will be shorter or longer depending on the lens focal length).

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    What is the dot resolution (size) of the BlackTooth laser?

  • what is the footprint of the vertical laser xl?

    The footprint (necessary floor space) for the Vertical Laser XL is: 123 inches x 26 inches or 3124.2 mm x 660.4 mm

    The height of the Vertical Laser XL is 87 inches or 2209.8 mm

    So, the envelope of the Vertical Laser XL is:
    length: 123 inches or 3124.2mm
    depth: 26 inches or 660.4 mm
    height: 87 inches or 2209.8 mm

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    what is the footprint of the vertical laser xl?

  • engraving timing and power settings vertical laser

    The rate at which the nozzle moves across the surface to produce a specific depth and how much power is needed for this will depend on the material that is being lased.

    Shallow engraving in a raster like operation is quite rapid where the nozzle is swinging back and forth very fast. Deeper engraving for vector type of designs will depend on the depth, which also relates to cutting. The thicker the material to cut, the slower the feedrate, and higher the power will be necessary.

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    engraving timing and power settings vertical laser

  • What file types will the vertical laser xl accept?

    LaserCAD and the Anywells Laser Controller used in our BlackTooth and Vertical Laser XL laser cutters and engravers can accept these file types:

    .nc (Gcode)
    .ai (Adobe Illustrator)
    .svg
    .pdf (Adobe Acrobat)
    .dxf (AutoCAD and Drawing Exchange)
    .plt
    .dst
    .dsb
    .uds (UD)
    .bmp (Bitmap image)
    .gif (Image)
    .jpg (Joint Photographers)
    .png

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    What file types will the vertical laser xl accept?

  • How would LinuxCNC be used with the vertical laser?

    It is possible to use LinuxCNC for laser cutters and engravers but not advisable. The efficiency and control with traditional CNC control programs cannot match that of Laser controllers. This is because laser controllers are very good at matching speed with power, especially with raster image burning. Moreover, controlling the laser tube while cutting and engraving is very built in with gcode. Special software can be used, but the processing and execution is not efficient.

    Laser controllers and associated software have matured well and can do cutting and engraving very well and is worth the extra expense.

    If you are still interested in getting LinuxCNC to work with the laser, let me know and we can discuss this in great detail on this FAQ.

    Additional Information:
    A better question might be "What are some good ways to control the vertical laser directly from a Linux machine without having to hop through Windows?" Let me know if you want me to post this as a separate question.

    If I were buying the blacktooth, I'd order the parallel port board for it and skip the anywells controller -- I notice that you don't show that as an option on the vertical, which is what's generating this question.

    Some background: All of our CAD/CAM is done in Linux (openscad, freecad, librecad, cadquery, blender, pycam, python gcode generators...), we use git and Makefiles and other automation scripts extensively, and we need to be able to avoid doing the double-hop from Linux via Windows to get files sent to the laser.

    An example use case is that of being able to say 'make' in a project's directory on any Linux machine on the network to ship the file to the laser, including power settings etc. Needing to ship it to Windows first, and then manually mouse around to set power etc. is what I want to avoid.

    With Epilogs, I used to always bypass the Windows/Coreldraw toolchain by using Gershenfeld's cam.py, sending PCL from Linux straight to the Epilog.

    Something equivalent to that -- being able to run a script in Linux to convert and ship the file straight to the laser -- is what I'm planning to do here. I mentioned LinuxCNC because it's what I'm already using for our mill, and I'm comfortable hacking on it. I'm not wedded to LinuxCNC for a laser, but I am looking for open-source flexibility and future-proofing.

    We don't even have any Windows machines any more -- we got rid of the last of them years ago, and I'd like to avoid going back.

    Additional Information:
    I've split the more general Linux use case out as a separate question at https://buildyourcnc.com/FAQ/13989

    Additional Information:
    Starting to find some answers -- forums have a thread which addresses some LinuxCNC questions at http://www.buildyourtools.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=3452 for instance.

    Additional Information:
    Example LinuxCNC config for the buildlog 2.X laser is at https://github.com/jv4779/2x_laser

    Additional Information:
    I'm going to need some time to digest this information. Curious, are you able to develop a program to change the g-code if need be? Will you be doing vector style cutting operations only? If so, the process may be pretty straight forward.

    Additional Information:
    Before we adapted the blackTooth laser to use the laser controller, we operated the machine using Mach3 and the z-axis direction signal was the chief mechanism to fire the laser (down=on, up=off). It worked like a charm. It would be better to use one of the output triggers to do this for safer operation; however.

    Additional Information:
    Blacktooth adaptation of the above buildlog config can be found at http://www.buildyourtools.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=18157#p18157

    Additional Information:
    Answering the earlier comment (is that you Patrick?) -- yes, we'd be doing vector primarily, though my wife (and CEO) is salivating over the potential for raster. I've got no problem writing a python script to massage gcode if that's what it would take to make things work. CAM is always a problem on Linux but I've been using a mix of things to generate gcode for milling (including just writing it by hand), and can get by as needed. Expect to spend this weekend looking around to see what others are doing.

    Additional Information:
    Yes. This isn’t Patrick. I manage the Customer Service section. I will try my best to help with this over the weekend and balance family time. Haha.

    I will check the links. If raster is a must, you can have two controllers controlling the machine using tri-state gates to the drivers. I did this for a customer a while ago to run CNC and laser with an external switch. You could use an external switch to switch between LinuxCNC operation and laser controller.

    Additional Information:
    This is Patrick. Auto correct on my phone turned the "is" to "isn't". Ha!

    Additional Information:
    The buildyourtools links doesn't really have much to do with LinuxCNC and the buildyourtools information on that thread (by MUK) implements a very similar configuration that I introduced when I first started selling the blackTooth (with the parallel control board). That style of configuration may work well with a LinuxCNC scenario.

    I would rather jump-in cold with the LinuxCNC solution and see if we can address each step. What CAM program will you be using? I ask this question because that program may have the ability to inject g-code at specific points where we can turn on and off the laser.

    Also, I'm going to merge the two FAQs once we pick the one we use the most often to figure this out. I'm also more comfortable using this Customer Service system to address the question for many reasons, one of which is I can tie these questions to the products directly to benefit many others.

    Additional Information:
    For laser CAM on Linux we have used cam.py in the past; it's just a python script, so modifying the gcode it generates is easy.

    I think we've reached a purchase decision; your responsiveness here has helped a lot with that, Patrick. It looks to me like we're going to be able to make this thing work, one way or another.

    Click the link to respond:
    How would LinuxCNC be used with the vertical laser?

  • what is the total envelope of the vertical laser xl?

    The footprint (necessary floor space) for the Vertical Laser XL is: 123 inches x 26 inches or 3124.2 mm x 660.4 mm

    The height of the Vertical Laser XL is 87 inches or 2209.8 mm

    So, the envelope of the Vertical Laser XL is:
    length: 123 inches or 3124.2mm
    depth: 26 inches or 660.4 mm
    height: 87 inches or 2209.8 mm

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    what is the total envelope of the vertical laser xl?

  • How long should it take to build the vertical laser kit?

    Assembling the Vertical Laser XL machine will vary depending on your specific abilities. The length of time can be as short as one weekend, or as long as two weeks.

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    How long should it take to build the vertical laser kit?

  • I am looking at the greenLean cnc machine 4'x8' Vertically Oriented CNC. I am based in the UK. What sort of shipping costs would we be looking at?

    You can determine the cost of shipping the greenLean or any other product to your country by adding the greenLean option to the cart. In the cart, click on the calculate shipping button and the shipping costs will be presented directly from the carriers that we use. You will also see the number of packages and weights of the packages in the cart, under the items in smaller print. Make sure that your shipping address is entered in the form prior to clicking on the calculate shipping button.

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    I am looking at the greenLean cnc machine 4'x8' Vertically Oriented CNC. I am based in the UK. What sort of shipping costs would we be looking at?

  • What is the acceleration limited to with the laser tube vertical?

    With our new Laser/Spindle Combo Head for our greenBull, we kept the acceleration the same and had no issues at all with the tube (regarding chipping breaking etc.). So there is no specific limit to the machine (take into affect the weight of your gantry and the overall output of your motors), but here is the setup we have now:
    (with a custom greenBull gantry (4' x 8'))
    X-axis
    SPI: 910.069
    Vel: 400.02
    Acc: 12
    Y-Axis
    SPI: 911.023
    Vel: 400.02
    Acc: 18
    Z-Axis
    SPI: 1632.653
    Vel: 79.98
    Acc: 5

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    What is the acceleration limited to with the laser tube vertical?

  • What CFM capacity fume extractor is necessary for vertical laser?

    We have used a 1600CFM air blower. You may not need that much power, but it is always better to be safe!

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    What CFM capacity fume extractor is necessary for vertical laser?

  • Can the leangreen vertical laser be adapted to attach a spindle as well?

    At this current time we only have the laser hybrid available for the greenBull. Due to the weight that is on the z-axis for the greenLean and the spring load, we have not tried retrofitting it just yet.

    However, with enough skill and patience anything is possible. Please let us know if you try this and any lessons learned along the way.

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    Can the leangreen vertical laser be adapted to attach a spindle as well?

  • WHAT MATERIALS CAN THE GREENBULL MACHINE CUT? LASER ETCH?

    The Greenbull machine can cut a very wide variety of materials ranging from foam to aluminum. We recommend the use of our 2.2kW spindle to allow the greatest flexibility. Aside from that, the most important thing is to use an appropriate end mill for the material you are cutting and to use appropriate speeds and feed rates.



    BYCNC Response:
    Our 40W laser can cut up to about 1/4" materials ranging from wood and acrylic down through lighter materials such as leather, fabric, foam, etc. Speed and final cut are greatly enhanced by an air assist upgrade. We also offer an 80W laser which has approximately twice the capabilities of the 40W.

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    WHAT MATERIALS CAN THE GREENBULL MACHINE CUT? LASER ETCH?

  • What is the footprint size of the Blacktooth laser machine?

    The footprint of the blackTooth laser machine is:
    Length: 37"/ 939.8mm
    Width: 33"-3/4"/ 857.25mm
    Height: 11"-1/8"/ 282.575mm

    The height will change with the doors that open to retrieve your material/project the highest point will be 28"-1/4"/ 717.55mm

    Additional Information:
    what is the maximum cutting depth of the blacktooth laser on plywood

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    What is the footprint size of the Blacktooth laser machine?

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