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Question #: 8008

Question: what is microstepping concerning the drivers

Current Solution

Stepper motors are designed to move in specific increments; these increments are called "steps". For example, a common standard is for 200 steps per full revolution. Microstepping is a method to send signals to the motor to move only a fraction of a full step at a time. For example, if a motor has 200 steps per revolution and is microstepped 1/16, then effectively there are 3200 small step movements (microsteps) per revolution instead of 200 larger ones. This makes the motion of the motor much smoother and more precisely controllable, at the cost of decreased holding torque.

Here are is a good references for stepper motor theory: http://users.ece.utexas.edu/~valvano/Datasheets/StepperMicrostep.pdf

And Wikipedia has a good overview as well:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stepper_motor

Additional Information:


Additional Information:
Therefore, the difference in 128th and 64th microstepping is increased resolution and smoothness for 128th microstepping, at the cost of decreased holding torque.

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Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • What's the difference between 128 microstepping and 1-1/64 microstepping?

    I'm not sure what particular devices you're talking about so I can't help you as far as compatibility goes, but a microstep fraction refers to the resolution of the rotating motor. let's say your motor takes 200 whole steps to make one complete revolution of the spindle. If you then set your motor to run at 1/64 microsteps it would mean your motor is taking 64 times more steps to cover the same distance, making a total of 12,800 steps to make one complete revolution of the spindle. So a smaller fraction of steps like 1/128, would take even more steps to complete one revolution, 25,600 in fact.

    If you're talking about motor drivers it's probably telling you how many options of resolution you have.
    one giving the highest resolution of 1/128 microsteps but probably still capable of doing 1/64, 1/32, 1/16, 1/8, 1/4, 1/2 and 1 whole step.
    the other one that says 1-1/64 is telling you it ranges between 1 whole step and 1/64th microsteps, so you could do the fractions between like 1/32, 1/16, 1/8, 1/4 and 1/2 as well.

    The amount of microsteps you want to make in one revolution is totally up to you, more steps potentially means a more precise machine, but at a certain point the extra steps may be unnecessary.

    hope this helps

    Click the link to respond:
    What's the difference between 128 microstepping and 1-1/64 microstepping?

  • What's the difference between 128 microstepping and 1-1/64 microstepping?

    Stepper motors are designed to move in specific increments; these increments are called "steps". For example, a common standard is for 200 steps per full revolution. Microstepping is a method to send signals to the motor to move only a fraction of a full step at a time. For example, if a motor has 200 steps per revolution and is microstepped 1/16, then effectively there are 3200 small step movements (microsteps) per revolution instead of 200 larger ones. This makes the motion of the motor much smoother and more precisely controllable, at the cost of decreased holding torque.

    Here are is a good references for stepper motor theory: http://users.ece.utexas.edu/~valvano/Datasheets/StepperMicrostep.pdf

    And Wikipedia has a good overview as well:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stepper_motor

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    Therefore, the difference in 128th and 64th microstepping is increased resolution and smoothness for 128th microstepping, at the cost of decreased holding torque.

    Click the link to respond:
    What's the difference between 128 microstepping and 1-1/64 microstepping?

  • What are the dipswitch settings for the drivers?

    blueChick:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackToe:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackFoot:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    greenBull:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in


    Scratch-Build / Book-Build Kit:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    Scratch built/book CNC with NEMA 34 motors and CW8060 microstep driver

    Additional Information:

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    What are the dipswitch settings for the drivers?

  • Do you know what drivers the xylotex control boxes have

    After looking at their site, we cannot determine what drivers are used in the xylotex control box.

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    Do you know what drivers the xylotex control boxes have

  • What are the fault conditions of the DM556 and DM542 drivers?

    There are three main LED fault signals that the DM556 and DM442 drivers exhibit. There is a red and green LED. The red LED will show the fault signals.

    The fault signals are:

    - Over-Current: If there is continuous current that is above 16 amps, the Red LED will flash every three seconds. Over-current could be related to: a short in the motor coils, or two of the wires of the motor are shorted; of the motor wires/coil is shorted to ground.

    - Over-voltage: If the power supply output to the driver exceeds a voltage of 52 volts, the red LED will flash twice every three seconds.

    - Phase Error: Is the motor wires are not connect, or they are connected incorrectly, the red LED will flash four times every three seconds.

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    What are the fault conditions of the DM556 and DM542 drivers?

  • What are the overall dimensions of the 2.5A small stepper drivers? Is there a CAD model available?

    The overall dimensions of our 2.5 modular stepper divers is:

    L: 1.875"/ 47.625mm
    W: 1.433"/ 36.3982mm
    H: .585"/ 14.859mm (height might change due to different terminal block height (other we have on hand is .464"/ 11.7856mm))

    Currently we do not have a CAD model on hand.

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    What are the overall dimensions of the 2.5A small stepper drivers? Is there a CAD model available?

  • I bought your 3 axis combo and need to know what name brand is the motors and their ounces and the drivers

    Surely you know the brand motors you sold me?

    Click the link to respond:
    I bought your 3 axis combo and need to know what name brand is the motors and their ounces and the drivers

  • I am looking at 2 of your drivers. 1 is the 1/64 step and the other is 1/256. What is the difference between the two?

    Stepper motors are designed to move in specific increments; these increments are called "steps". For example, a common standard is for 200 steps per full revolution. Microstepping is a method to send signals to the motor to move only a fraction of a full step at a time. For example, if a motor has 200 steps per revolution and is microstepped 1/16, then effectively there are 3200 small step movements (microsteps) per revolution instead of 200 larger ones. This makes the motion of the motor much smoother and more precisely controllable, at the cost of decreased holding torque.

    Here are is a good references for stepper motor theory: http://users.ece.utexas.edu/~valvano/Datasheets/StepperMicrostep.pdf

    And Wikipedia has a good overview as well:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stepper_motor

    Click the link to respond:
    I am looking at 2 of your drivers. 1 is the 1/64 step and the other is 1/256. What is the difference between the two?

  • I am looking at 2 of your motor drivers. 1 is the 1/64 step and the other is 1/256. What is the difference between the two?

    Stepper motors are designed to move in specific increments; these increments are called "steps". For example, a common standard is for 200 steps per full revolution. Microstepping is a method to send signals to the motor to move only a fraction of a full step at a time. For example, if a motor has 200 steps per revolution and is microstepped 1/16, then effectively there are 3200 small step movements (microsteps) per revolution instead of 200 larger ones. This makes the motion of the motor much smoother and more precisely controllable, at the cost of decreased holding torque.

    Here are is a good references for stepper motor theory: http://users.ece.utexas.edu/~valvano/Datasheets/StepperMicrostep.pdf

    And Wikipedia has a good overview as well:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stepper_motor

    Click the link to respond:
    I am looking at 2 of your motor drivers. 1 is the 1/64 step and the other is 1/256. What is the difference between the two?

  • Is the amp rating on your drivers the total amps or amps per phase?

    The amp rating on our drivers is the maximum amount of amps that the driver can output, depending on your preference or requirements.

    Click the link to respond:
    Is the amp rating on your drivers the total amps or amps per phase?

  • I'm building my own machine using your motors and drivers. What is the best dip switch settings for the 3.0 amp drivers powering the 425 oz motors

    The settings that you will use for your 3.0 amp driver to properly power and turn your 425 oz-in stepper motor will cheifly depend on your application and the mechanical parts you are using on your machine. In all circumstances, the amp setting for the stepper motor (according to the datasheet) should be 2.8 amps. Use the closest setting on the driver without going over.

    Here is a good rule of thumb for the microstepping which will correspond to the resolution, but wil also affect torque. You always want to try to achieve the best torque and resolution for the axis you are moving but go with the lowest microstepping possible. In cases where there is mechanical advantage, like a lead screw scenario, where for each motor revolution, the axis move a very small amount, you will want a very low microstep value. This is because the mechanical configuration will provide most of the finer resolution and you will not need the microstepping to assist in this. Increase the microstepping only in conditions where the axis is not moving smooth enough, or where there is a mechanical disadvantage. A mechanical disadvantage would be where the stepper motor is causing a great amount of movement in the axis and the resolutions suffers from this condition. Increase the microstep value up to your desired resolution, but don't go over since the torque of the motor will decrease.

    Click the link to respond:
    I'm building my own machine using your motors and drivers. What is the best dip switch settings for the 3.0 amp drivers powering the 425 oz motors

  • Does your electronics combo allow 2 drivers on a single axis on the interface board?

    Yes, you can have two drivers connected to a single axis. If you want the two drivers/motors to work as a single, more concerted pair, then I would suggest connecting the two drivers to a single step pulse and direction signal.

    That is to say:
    driver 1 and driver 2 have wires connecting from the CP terminals of the drivers to a single step terminal on the interface board (USB or parallel breakout board), and the CW terminals of the drivers connected to a single direction terminal on the interface board.

    If the motors need to spin in the opposite directions, simply reverse one of the the motor A B coil connections (i.e. wires that would go to A+ and A- is connected to the B+ and B-, and the same with the B+ and B- to the A+ and A-). You can alternatively resolve this mechanically if desired.

    Click the link to respond:
    Does your electronics combo allow 2 drivers on a single axis on the interface board?

  • Using your NEMA 24 stepping motor with microstepping, can I get a speed range from 3 RPM to 600 RPM ?
  • Can this driver accept 5 lead Nema 34 steppers: Stepping Motor Driver (24-70 volts DC, up to 6.0 amps, microstepping from 1/2 to 1/256)

    Please measure the resistance between all the wires in all combinations to determine where these wires exists with the coils. I am not familiar with 5 wire stepper motors.

    Click the link to respond:
    Can this driver accept 5 lead Nema 34 steppers: Stepping Motor Driver (24-70 volts DC, up to 6.0 amps, microstepping from 1/2 to 1/256)

  • What is the 24VDC Power requirement for the Pokeys47CNC? 1A, 2A? ...I'm running a separate 36VDC PS to the Stepper drivers and a 24VDC PS to the Controller.

    Polabs prepared step by step user guide for PoKeys57CNC and Mach4 to try answering such questions. It is available in our downloads section: https://www.poscope.com/wp-content/uploads/downloads/Pokeys/LibrariesAndPlugins/Mach4 and PoKeys57CNC - step by step guide.pdf

    Click the link to respond:
    What is the 24VDC Power requirement for the Pokeys47CNC? 1A, 2A? ...I'm running a separate 36VDC PS to the Stepper drivers and a 24VDC PS to the Controller.

  • What are the toggle switch settings on the stepper motor drivers for the .5 in. lead screw 10 tpi 2 turns per inch? Thankyou!

    On the top of the stepper motor drivers is a grid with the appropriate toggle switch positions for the lead screw being used. If it is 2 turns per inch, the proper toggle switch positions would be 01101110. Try this and see if it works.

    Click the link to respond:
    What are the toggle switch settings on the stepper motor drivers for the .5 in. lead screw 10 tpi 2 turns per inch? Thankyou!

  • WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ROCK CRYSTAL ?

    The first number is the amount of chromium that is contained in the stainless, i.e., 18 is 18% chromium. The second number is the amount of nickel, i.e., 8 stands for 8% nickel. So 18/8 means that this stainless steel contains 18% chromium and 8% nickel. 18/10 is 18% chromium and 10% nickel. The higher the numbers the more corrosion resistant the material. 18/0 is a misleading designation. Both 18/8 and 18/10 contain nickel and are part of the grade family "300 series" stainless. 18/0 means that there is 18% chromium but zero nickel. When there is no nickel the stainless grade family is the "400 series". 400 series are not as corrosion resistant as the 300 series and are magnetic, where the 300 series are non-magnetic.

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    WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ROCK CRYSTAL ?

  • WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE IN A 2.5 AXIS MACHINE?

    An axis is a direction of motion controlled by the CNC machine control. It can be linear (motion along a straight line) or circular (a rotary motion). The number of axes a machine has determines it's machining capabilities. A 2.5 axis machine really has three moving axes, but only two axes can move together (most machines sold today are full three axis machines). For machining centers, a three axis machine will have three linear axes. A four or five axis machine will have three linear axes as well as one or two rotary axes.

    Note that 2.5 versus 3 axis has yet another context. 2.5 axis machining requires that the machine have three axes, but only two axes must be moving simultaneously at any one time. (Simple operations, like drilling and most milling, fall into this category). On the other hand 3-axis machining requires that all three axes be moving at the same time (More complex operations, like the machining of sculptured surfaces required in molds and airfoils, fall into this category.)

    Additional Information:


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    WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE IN A 2.5 AXIS MACHINE?

  • WHAT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN 3 AXIS AND 5 CNC?

    3 axis machines cannot create undercuts in the part.

    These videos show the capabilities of 3 and 5 axis machining:

    3-axis CNC:

    &feature=fvwrel

    5-axis CNC:
    &feature=related

    Additional Information:


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    Additional Information:


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    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    WHAT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN 3 AXIS AND 5 CNC?

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