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Question #: 943

Question: I couldn't find any information about how to mount the "z-axis lead screw in the book" (Build Your Own CNC)

Current Solution

The details will differ depending on the type of lead screw you use.

For allthread lead screws, you will need the 1/2" square nut, 1/2" allthread lead screw, two 1/4" screws and nuts to hold the square nut in place, two 1/2" ID bearings, two standard 1/2" nuts, and one coupling hub.

Attach the square nut to the nut support using the two 1/4" screw and nuts. The bearings will need to be inserted into the seats of the lower and upper part of the z-axis. Insert the lead screw through the top bearing. Use one of the standard 1/2" nuts and start threading it on the allthread screw just below the bearing. Lower the lead screw to the square nut and start to screw the lead screw into the square nut. Continue until the screw is near the lower bearing. Add another standard 1/2" nut to the screw and keep turning the screw until the screw just passes the lower bearing. Add the coupling hub to the top of the screw just above the upper bearing. Turn the lower and upper standard 1/2" nuts until they are snug against the bearing. If the standard 1/2" nuts become loosened, consider adding another nut to each end against the existing nut to keep them in place.

For 1/2" acme 5 start lead screws, you will need to use an antibacklash nut in place of the square nut. This nut attaches with a flange using two #8 screws and nuts. The standard 1/2" nuts are replaced by clamping collars.

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Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • I can't find any information in the BlackTooth instructions about how to connect the 8 wires from the LED display to the parallel breakout board. The two going to the pot seem, in the illustration, to be soldered together and to the centre terminal of the pot? Help, please.

    To connect the parallel port breakout board to the LEDs, use step number 18. The connections are listed at the bottom. Here it is for your convenience.

    For the LED connections on the parallel breakout board:

    - The x axis LED will be connected to pin #2 and 5V
    - The y axis LED will be connected to pin #4 and 5V
    - The laser on/off LED is connected to pin #6 and 5V

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I can't find any information in the BlackTooth instructions about how to connect the 8 wires from the LED display to the parallel breakout board. The two going to the pot seem, in the illustration, to be soldered together and to the centre terminal of the pot? Help, please.

  • I can't seem to find information on spindle control via the breakout board. Can someone point me in the right direction?

    We currently can only control the On/Off of the spindle via Mach 3 and through our Parallel Interface Board. We have the listed instructions on our Parallel Interface Board webpage, will be a easy job that will included 2 wires (18-24g wire will be fine) from your inverter(VFD) to the location of your Parallel Interface Board.

    Parallel Interface Board webpage: https://buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-parallel-breakout-relay

    In regards to our USB Interface Board, we are currently working on a prototype board that will allow the same On/Off capability with Planet-CNC. Prototype Board currently not available as of yet.

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    I can't seem to find information on spindle control via the breakout board. Can someone point me in the right direction?

  • I'm about to order your laser cutter , item 279 and a little confused.. in your faq it states you need wire and connectors for assembly, can you be specific on amount and guage of wire or tell me where to find that information?

    The connections between the driver and the breakout board(USB/Parallel)22-24 AWG wire is preference also going from the potentiometer going to LSPS(laser power supply) , now going from the power supply to the drivers/laser power supply 16-18 AWG wire is our preference.

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    I'm about to order your laser cutter , item 279 and a little confused.. in your faq it states you need wire and connectors for assembly, can you be specific on amount and guage of wire or tell me where to find that information?

  • I'M SEARCHING FOR INFORMATION ABOUT THE HEALTH RISKS OF CELLULAR ANTENNAS' RADIATION. I NEED SCIENTIFIC (SCIENTIFIC PAPERS IN JOURNALS) THIS.

    Cellular telephone base stations are low-powered radiofrequency (RF) transmitters which operate at around 850-900 or 1800-1900 MHz (depending on the technology and region of the world). RF energy in a similar frequency range is used by many other technologies such as microwave ovens, UHF television, other communications systems, and radar. Health and safety issues related to RF energy have been studied for many years and there is an immense literature on the subject. Here are some sources that review health and safety issues related to RF energy from cellular base stations.

    A fact sheet published by the World Health Organization. There is also a Spanish version available on the WHO EMF website.
    Also see the IEEE EMBS Committee on Man and Radiation Report. Other reports are available through its website.
    The International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has published a lot on health and safety of RF energy. See its website. The ICNIRP published an article that describes the ICNIRP exposure limits for RF energy and their scientific rationale. See "Guidelines for Limiting Exposure to Time-Varying Electric, Magnetic, and Electromagnetic Fields (up to 300 GHz)," Health Physics Vol. 74, No 4, pp 494-522, 1998.
    A very detailed assessment of the scientific evidence related to health and safety of mobile telephones and base stations is in the recent (May 2000) report by the Independent Expert Group on Mobile Phones (IEGMP) titled "Mobile Phones and Health" This study concludes "the balance of evidence to date suggests that exposures to RF radiation at levels below [international exposure guidelines] do not cause adverse health effects to the general population" but that "there may be biological effects at exposures below those guidelines." Public exposure to RF energy from cellular base stations is invariably far below the ICNIRP exposure guidelines.

    Kenneth R. Foster
    Professor, Bioengineering
    University of Pennsylvania

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I'M SEARCHING FOR INFORMATION ABOUT THE HEALTH RISKS OF CELLULAR ANTENNAS' RADIATION. I NEED SCIENTIFIC (SCIENTIFIC PAPERS IN JOURNALS) THIS.

  • I AM TAKING THE FINAL YEAR PROJECT IN BASE STATIONS AND AIR INTERFACE. WOULD LIKE TO HAVE SOME INFORMATION.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is the primary federal agency responsible for safety aspects of modern-day wireless telecommunications systems. The FCC's Internet address is shown below. Recently FCC published an excellent report, cited below, to assist citizens and local governments dealing with siting of telecommuncations towers. This report contains charts and figures describing the characteristics and performance of telecommunications antennas. The report also contains practical guidance on application of provisions of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, which is the governing legislation regarding safety and siting of wireless telelcommunications facilities. Web page: RF Safety Program Page. Report title: "A Local Government Official's Guide to Transmitting Antenna RF Emission Safety: Rules, Procedures, and Practical Guidance." The Local and State Government Advisory Committee (LSGAC) and the FCC have developed this guide to aid local governmental officials and citizens in understanding safety issues related to radiofrequency emissions from telecommunications towers. Gary Zeman, Sc.D., CHP Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I AM TAKING THE FINAL YEAR PROJECT IN BASE STATIONS AND AIR INTERFACE. WOULD LIKE TO HAVE SOME INFORMATION.

  • I'm planning a rack and pinion style gantry, and need clarification on how to slave a second stepper to the Y (or X). Can you direct me to that information for your products?

    There are two things to consider when using two stepping motors on a single axis. Since you want both motors to spin at the same rate and possibly in the same direction, you need to connect both motor drivers to the same breakout board pins. For example, if you want two motors on the x-axis and the x-axis pins on the breakout board are #2 for step and #3 for direction, the #2 will connect to the step (cp) terminal on each driver and the #3 will connect to the dir (cw) terminal on each driver.

    However, if the motors will be opposing (one motor will need to spin in the other direction), you will need to consider either flipping the rack on one side, or adding a circuit to invert the direction (#3) signal going to that driver.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I'm planning a rack and pinion style gantry, and need clarification on how to slave a second stepper to the Y (or X). Can you direct me to that information for your products?

  • I NEED HELP IN GATHERING PUBLISHED INFORMATION ABOUT THE RISKS POSED BY CELL TOWERS PLACED ON SCHOOL GROUNDS. THERE WHICH WOULD ENABLE ME TO GATHER/CALCULATE OR MEASURE RADIATION SPECIFIC SITE?

    The best single reference is the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Website. Look for:
    Bulletin 56, "Questions and Answers about Biological Effects and Potential Hazards of Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields,"

    Bulletin 65, "Evaluating Compliance With FCC Guidelines for Human Exposure to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields,"

    "A Local Government Official's Guide to Transmitting Antenna RF Emission Safety: Rules, Procedures, and Practical Guidance."
    An excellent technical paper with field measurements of cell-tower emissions was published by R.C. Petersen and P.A. Testagrossa in the journal Bioelectromagnetics, volume 13, page 527ff, 1992. If you need onsite technical support and services there are various consultants available, such as Richard Tell Associates, Inc. Gary Zeman, ScD, CHP Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I NEED HELP IN GATHERING PUBLISHED INFORMATION ABOUT THE RISKS POSED BY CELL TOWERS PLACED ON SCHOOL GROUNDS. THERE WHICH WOULD ENABLE ME TO GATHER/CALCULATE OR MEASURE RADIATION SPECIFIC SITE?

  • I have a project very similar to cnc machine. I need 3 lead screws of 1.8 m with all set (supports, bearings...etc). and 3 NEMA 42 motors that I can connect with. if those are available, I need the information about shipping to Oman or UAE.

    We carry several sizes of lead screw and stepper motors on our website, for example here https://buildyourcnc.com/Item/mechanical-leadscrews-lead-screw-!5-5-starts-10-tpi and here https://buildyourcnc.com/ProductSearchResults.aspx. Please call us at 281-815-7701 to discuss the particular lengths you would need and shipping options.

    Additional Information:
    https://buildyourcnc.com/ProductSearchResults.aspx is not working

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I have a project very similar to cnc machine. I need 3 lead screws of 1.8 m with all set (supports, bearings...etc). and 3 NEMA 42 motors that I can connect with. if those are available, I need the information about shipping to Oman or UAE.

  • I am having a significant amount of trouble getting the 1/2" ID bearing to fit over the 1/2" 5 start lead screw. I can only get it about half an inch onto the rod. Any tips to get it to slide further?

    There should be no problem with getting the 1/2" ID bearing on the lead screw, unless there is a bent in the lead screw or it has a piece of debris that is causing a issue.

    Unless one of these items were purchased from a 3rd party, then there might be tolerance issues from the original manufacture which might cause this issue.
    If possible please send photos to customerservice@buildyourcnc.com

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I am having a significant amount of trouble getting the 1/2" ID bearing to fit over the 1/2" 5 start lead screw. I can only get it about half an inch onto the rod. Any tips to get it to slide further?

  • I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

  • I want to purchase some items from your co. How do i go about it. I already have the buildyourcnc book and wand to begin.

    For purchasing on our website, our account log in is a safe way to keep your personal data at hand for future orders. However we do not keep any bank information in our systems, it is a single use system.

    Now dealing with the cnc book, you can view our web version of the book with a list of materials and hardware that will be needed here (https://www.buildyourcnc.com/cnckitintro.aspx).

    Adding the items to your cart in the quantity's needed, now for certain items for example, or ACME screws, and aluminum angles will require a total length needed, but the specific lengths required will have to be email here (customerservice@buildyourcnc.com) or called here (281-815-7701) with the completion of your order.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I want to purchase some items from your co. How do i go about it. I already have the buildyourcnc book and wand to begin.

  • How do I secure the non-motor end of the lead screw for my 'Book' machine build? Does it just sit inside the bearing or do i use a nut to lock it in place? I did not see any instructions for this in the book.

    Use a clamping collar (if you are using an ACME lead screw) or a couple of 1/2 nuts (if using an allthread) against the bearing to keep the bearing in place and make sure there is no axial play.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    How do I secure the non-motor end of the lead screw for my 'Book' machine build? Does it just sit inside the bearing or do i use a nut to lock it in place? I did not see any instructions for this in the book.

  • THEY ARE ASKING FOR THE ACTIVATION CODE AND SERIAL NUMBER USB BOARD. HOW CAN GET THAT INFORMATION?

    To get the activation code, all you need to do is plug the USB board into the computer using a USB cable, go to machine -> firmware -> update. After the firmware is updated the program will present to you a dialog box containing the activation code.

    Additional Information:
    MUAR-QVXU-CAYW-CBWQ


    Additional Information:
    MUIS-RQPB-PTHB-QTTB

    Additional Information:
    MUIH-EERP-IADB-TRIP

    Additional Information:
    9zYWBVf5TxKSK7hEr8gFX3EBw5wa0AMMllQqgftIAnKvZ8DXItLxaPbOB3jWvnpczl/sM/De0scRPHfSxWGmcA==

    Additional Information:
    Key: LUQR-BQYI-SCEW-QVBT

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    after i copy the code in the lower case i recived the same message (more than 8 times) ,, this is a evaluation...,, what i need to do to register properly?

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    THEY ARE ASKING FOR THE ACTIVATION CODE AND SERIAL NUMBER USB BOARD. HOW CAN GET THAT INFORMATION?

  • I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can lift using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can lift using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

  • I ordered a 2.2kW spindle as a guest on March 3rd. How long does it take for you to provide shipping information?

    I will check

    Additional Information:
    The license was purchased and the developer is sending you the license shortly.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I ordered a 2.2kW spindle as a guest on March 3rd. How long does it take for you to provide shipping information?

  • I need wiring diagram for motor to driver to usb motion card. I cannot find diagram. I have been unable to get information for a week.
  • I have just brought your build your own cnc machine book and it talks about PDF downloads. Where do I find them please ?

    You can see the component list on the hardware and plans machine (scratch build machine) since it is the same machine in the book:

    https://www.buildyourcnc.com/Item/cnc-machine-scratchbuild

    Additional Information:

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I have just brought your build your own cnc machine book and it talks about PDF downloads. Where do I find them please ?

  • I bought the book that you co-authored (Build Your own CNC) a few years ago. Its not till now that I’ll be able to start the project. Are all the parts still available? The book is about 8 years old now so I’m wondering if its still worth building that design? (I don’t see a newer version of the book)

    This book offers an excellent platform upon which to learn CNC technology and fabrication no matter how old the book is. If you are new to CNC routers, I wuld highly recommend this book. The book will provide you with the plans and the knowledge to build a capable entry level CNC router and you will learn the fundamentals necessary to become successful with fabrication, maintaining the machine (and almost any machine), and how these complex CNC routers work.

    The machine kits on this website were created as an upgrade or alternative to the book CNC router build. Specifically the blackToe CNC Router: https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/cnc-machine-blacktoe-v4-2x4

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I bought the book that you co-authored (Build Your own CNC) a few years ago. Its not till now that I’ll be able to start the project. Are all the parts still available? The book is about 8 years old now so I’m wondering if its still worth building that design? (I don’t see a newer version of the book)

  • I am asking what to set my steps per using your kit stepper motors and a 1/2"x13 lead screw with Mach3

    Here is the formula for steps/inch (steps per inch)

    Steps = how many steps for a full ration of the motor = standard motor steps x number of microsteps for each step
    Standard motor steps for our stepping motors is 200 steps per revolution.
    Microsteps are selected on the driver and are shown as full, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32 etc... Use the denominator for the number of microsteps per step.

    Inches = how far the travel is for one full rotation of the motor. For the 1/2" - 13 TPI (threads per inch), the travel length will be 1"/13 or .076923". So, for one revolution of the motor, the travel distance will be .076923 inches.

    So, the steps = 200 * microsteps, let's make this 1/4 just for the formula.
    The inches will be .076923. Plug those into the formula:
    Steps / inch = (200 * 4) / .076923 This can also be written as:
    200 * 4 / (1 / 13) = 10,400

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I am asking what to set my steps per using your kit stepper motors and a 1/2"x13 lead screw with Mach3

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