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Question #: 2358

Question: On the Book Build: I'm changing the 13TPI 1/2" lead screw with the 1/2" 10 TPI Acme screw with the anti backlash nut. This is for the Z axis only. What should I know about installing it and what are the numbers I need to plug into the motor tuning area.

Current Solution

The settings that will have to be change will be your steps per inch in motor tuning (mach 3), or settings/axes(planetCNC). But we do not have the actual numbers/specs that will fit your 10 TPI 5 start lead screw, here is a tutorial video which explains how to get the exact numbers you need! (

).
Here is a default setting that you might be able to tune and adjust accordingly: 1600 steps, accel 400.02, velocity 5.

Respond:

Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • On the book build machine I changed the Z axis from a 13 tpi lead screw to an acme 10 tpi 5 start lead screw. What numbers do I put into the motor tuneing boxes.

    The settings that will have to be change will be your steps per inch in motor tuning (mach 3), or settings/axes(planetCNC). But we do not have the actual numbers/specs that will fit your 10 TPI 5 start lead screw, here is a tutorial video which explains how to get the exact numbers you need! (

    )

    Click the link to respond:
    On the book build machine I changed the Z axis from a 13 tpi lead screw to an acme 10 tpi 5 start lead screw. What numbers do I put into the motor tuneing boxes.

  • I just changed my X and Y to the ACME 1/2" 5 start lead screw. What are the motor tuning numbers. I have the book built machine.

    The settings that will have to be change will be your steps per inch in motor tuning (mach 3), or settings/axes(planetCNC). But we do not have the actual numbers/specs that will fit your 10 TPI 5 start lead screw, here is a tutorial video which explains how to get the exact numbers you need! (

    )

    Click the link to respond:
    I just changed my X and Y to the ACME 1/2" 5 start lead screw. What are the motor tuning numbers. I have the book built machine.

  • thank you for the reply. I would be really good to know the calculation. The lead screw is 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI. Please provide the calculation for determing the maximum weight motor can handle on Z-axis on book build cnc. And one more question. If I am cutting 18mm MDF with 6mm cutting bit (so 6mm pass), what can be the maximum speed rate of cutting and spindle speed of router? thank you

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    thank you for the reply. I would be really good to know the calculation. The lead screw is 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI. Please provide the calculation for determing the maximum weight motor can handle on Z-axis on book build cnc. And one more question. If I am cutting 18mm MDF with 6mm cutting bit (so 6mm pass), what can be the maximum speed rate of cutting and spindle speed of router? thank you

  • Regarding 1/2" 5 start and 10 TPI ACME precision lead screw, what the maximum length you can ship within USA? I'm looking for something like 100" and I could use a 1" screw if available. Please include estimated price. Thanks.

    The maximum length we can ship is a total of 78" inches. However we can send your required length in portions. Please refer to adding the total items you require to your cart to get a visualized amount and shipping cost.

    Click the link to respond:
    Regarding 1/2" 5 start and 10 TPI ACME precision lead screw, what the maximum length you can ship within USA? I'm looking for something like 100" and I could use a 1" screw if available. Please include estimated price. Thanks.

  • hello there, i am using servo motor for my X and Y Axis but i dont know how to calculate steps/mm for that, the lead screw i am using is have pitch of .5 mm. please helpme on this i have done everything only this point is pending.

    The formula for finding the steps per mm is found in the units itself. First, you mentioned that the motor is a servo. This needs to be clarified as a servo is different than a stepper motor. Some servos behave similar to a stepper motor, so I will continue with this in mind.

    The formula is (steps/mm):

    You need to find the steps. The stepper motor has a natural number of steps per a full revolution. This is typically 200 steps per revolution.

    The driver for the stepper motor allows you to increase the number of steps per revolution by adding a specified number of steps between each step. For instance, if you set the driver to 1/4 microstepping, then instead of having 200 steps per revolution, you would have 200 x 4 = 800 steps per revolution.

    So now we have the first part of the formula:

    Steps / mm = (200 x 4) / mm

    Lets determine the mm side of the formula:

    You mention that the pitch is 0.5 mm. Check to insure that the lead is also 0.5 mm. This could be a multiple start lead screw where the pitch is different than the turns per mm. If in this case, that the 0.5 mm is the travel for one full revolution, then you can simply plug this into the formula as:

    mm = .5 mm

    Otherwise, determine how fat the travel is for one complete revolution.

    Therefor, with what we know and the driver is set at 1/4 microstepping and the stepper motor has a natural step count per revolution at 200:

    steps / mm = (200 steps x 4) / 0.5 mm = 800 steps / 0.5 mm = 1600 steps / mm

    If your travel for one revolution is not 0.5 mm, then plug in your travel distance instead.



    Additional Information:
    i know about steps/mm calculation for stepper motor, because i am using servo motor that why i asked about that. please tell for servo motor.

    Additional Information:
    because its my first time with servo motor i have no idea about calculation of parameter with servo.

    Additional Information:
    Have you attempted to contact the manufacturer or seller of the servo? We typically respond to customers of our products on this customer service area, unless we have extensive knowledge of the subject and can answer the question efficiently.

    Click the link to respond:
    hello there, i am using servo motor for my X and Y Axis but i dont know how to calculate steps/mm for that, the lead screw i am using is have pitch of .5 mm. please helpme on this i have done everything only this point is pending.

  • I have your Nema 24 electronics kit and am having problems with the Z axis dropping over time. I am using a PC 8902 motor. Any ideas on what the problem is? What should be the motor tuning values in Mach3? Thanks

    Make sure all your bolts/screws are tighten correctly and if using a lead screw make sure your anti-backlash nut is not offset. Now a default setting will be 10101100 for your driver dip switch settings and in motor tuning (mach3) 1600 steps per, 400.02 velocity, 4 in acceleration. now the acceleration and velocity can be adjusted to move your machine faster, but if set to high they could stall. Make sure you have the correct wiring from your motor to your driver (https://www.buildyourcnc.com/Documents/PN.SM60HT86-2008BF-U%20(inhouse%20PN.60BYGH303-13)%20(1).pdf).

    Click the link to respond:
    I have your Nema 24 electronics kit and am having problems with the Z axis dropping over time. I am using a PC 8902 motor. Any ideas on what the problem is? What should be the motor tuning values in Mach3? Thanks

  • I have a project very similar to cnc machine. I need 3 lead screws of 1.8 m with all set (supports, bearings...etc). and 3 NEMA 42 motors that I can connect with. if those are available, I need the information about shipping to Oman or UAE.
  • HI, I HAVE INTENTION OF PURCHASING YOUR 1/2 INCH PRECISION LEAD SCREW SET TO BUILD MY CNC MACHINE, COULD THE SCHEMATIC DIMENSION ANTI-BACKLASH NUT, BEARING FOR AND SHIM? ALSO IS 2.2KW SPINDLE ABLE MILL ALUMINUM WHAT ACCURACY?

    BYCNC response:

    Milling aluminum is no problem with our machines.

    Here is a video we recently did with our 4'x8' machine. The aluminum piece is about 1/4" thick: https://buildyourcnc.com/tutorials/tutorial-greenbull-aluminum-cutting

    The accuracy you will see from our our 2.2kW spindle is entirely dependent on the precision of your build, so it's not possible to say what level of accuracy you can achieve without an examination of the complete system. However, our spindles have a runout of less than .0001 in, which includes the collets that we sell. If you use a collet from another manufacturer, we cannot guarantee this TIR (Total Indicated Runout) dimension.

    For the dimension drawing of the anti-backlash nut, please contact us directly by phone or email to techsupport@buildyourcnc.com

    User response:
    I have emailed waiting for your reply.

    User response:
    Hi, I am still waiting for your email reply.

    BYCNC response:
    Your email has been sent.

    Click the link to respond:
    HI, I HAVE INTENTION OF PURCHASING YOUR 1/2 INCH PRECISION LEAD SCREW SET TO BUILD MY CNC MACHINE, COULD THE SCHEMATIC DIMENSION ANTI-BACKLASH NUT, BEARING FOR AND SHIM? ALSO IS 2.2KW SPINDLE ABLE MILL ALUMINUM WHAT ACCURACY?

  • HI, I HAVE INTENTION OF PURCHASING YOUR 1/2 INCH PRECISION LEAD SCREW SET TO BUILD MY CNC MACHINE, COULD THE SCHEMATIC DIMENSION ANTI-BACKLASH NUT, BEARING FOR AND SHIM? ALSO IS 2.2KW SPINDLE ABLE MILL ALUMINUM WHAT ACCURACY?

    BYCNC response:

    Milling aluminum is no problem with our machines.

    Here is a video we recently did with our 4'x8' machine. The aluminum piece is about 1/4" thick: https://buildyourcnc.com/tutorials/tutorial-greenbull-aluminum-cutting

    The accuracy you will see from our our 2.2kW spindle is entirely dependent on the precision of your build, so it's not possible to say what level of accuracy you can achieve without an examination of the complete system. However, our spindles have a runout of less than .0001 in, which includes the collets that we sell. If you use a collet from another manufacturer, we cannot guarantee this TIR (Total Indicated Runout) dimension.

    For the dimension drawing of the anti-backlash nut, please contact us directly by phone or email to techsupport@buildyourcnc.com

    User response:
    I have emailed waiting for your reply.

    User response:
    Hi, I am still waiting for your email reply.

    BYCNC response:
    Your email has been sent.

    Click the link to respond:
    HI, I HAVE INTENTION OF PURCHASING YOUR 1/2 INCH PRECISION LEAD SCREW SET TO BUILD MY CNC MACHINE, COULD THE SCHEMATIC DIMENSION ANTI-BACKLASH NUT, BEARING FOR AND SHIM? ALSO IS 2.2KW SPINDLE ABLE MILL ALUMINUM WHAT ACCURACY?

  • BUILDING ONE OF YOUR GREENBULL 6X LONG AND 2.2 KILOWATT SPINDLE DOES NOT FIT. SEEMS LEAD SCREW YOU SENT WITH KIT IS SHORT 42" LOOKS LIKE IT NEEDS TO BE 5 OR 6 INCH LONGER. THIS CORRECT? WHAT THE NEEDED LENGTH FOR UNIT?
  • I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

  • I have a lead screw machine I built from the book plans (i know, ancient history) and I'm thinking of converting the X and Y axis to rollerchain. Assuming I can configure my controller appropriately, is there anything I should buy besides chain, drive cog, tension cog and mounting hardware?

    You want to make sure that the motors will be able to provide the necessary torque since there will not be mechanical advantage using roller chain. You will need a way to fix the chain to each end. I like to use #4 - 3/4" screws and #4 nuts. You will need a drive sprocket for each axis and a couple idler sprockets on each axis to serve as tensioners and guiding the roller chain.

    Additional Information:
    OK cool. I have NEMA 24 steppers rated 425 oz-in. Is there some rule of thumb I can use to guess if that's enough? I'm not planning to push against hard stock material.

    Click the link to respond:
    I have a lead screw machine I built from the book plans (i know, ancient history) and I'm thinking of converting the X and Y axis to rollerchain. Assuming I can configure my controller appropriately, is there anything I should buy besides chain, drive cog, tension cog and mounting hardware?

  • Building one of your greenBull 6X Long and 2.2 kilowatt spindle does not fit. Seems lead screw you sent with kit is short 42" looks like it needs to be 5 or 6 inch longer. Is this correct? What is the needed length of lead screw for this unit?
  • I am building your "Green Bull' 6 foot wide kit and I am at the stage of attaching the motor and drive chain. I would like to know if you have an modification kit available to put the 1/2" ACME screw on the Y-axis?

    Currently we do not have that modification kit, our set up is fixed for our greenBull only modification kit we have for this model is the long z-axis kit(Designed for Foam cutting).

    Click the link to respond:
    I am building your "Green Bull' 6 foot wide kit and I am at the stage of attaching the motor and drive chain. I would like to know if you have an modification kit available to put the 1/2" ACME screw on the Y-axis?

  • I received the electronics for book build cnc machine. I need to know how much weight the z-axis motor can hold since my (craftsman) router seems to be heavy. It is 2HP with variable speed

    The motor is helped by the mechanical leverage of the screw. The 425 oz-in motors that are included in the standard electronics combo has very high torque for that type of machine. You will have no problem using that motor for the book machine.

    We use that motor for very heavy spindles on the blackToe and blackFoot CNC Machine kits.

    You will need to do the mechanical leverage calculation along with the torque of the motor to determine the actual weight it will lift. The calculation will need to consider the type and pitch of the screw and it would also consider the gravity constant of 9.8 m/s/s.

    If you need me to determine this formula and work out the calculation based on the screw you are using, please let me know.

    Additional Information:
    thank you for the reply. I would be really good to know the calculation. The lead screw is 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI. Please provide the calculation. And one more question. If I am cutting 18mm MDF with 6mm cutting bit (so 6mm pass), what can be the maximum speed rate of cutting and spindle speed of router?
    thank you

    Click the link to respond:
    I received the electronics for book build cnc machine. I need to know how much weight the z-axis motor can hold since my (craftsman) router seems to be heavy. It is 2HP with variable speed

  • Hi, I need the lead screws and bearings for the 4' x-axis, the 2'(?) y-axis and the 1'(?) z-axis as specified in the book 'Build your own cnc'. I am not sure which to order on your website. Thanks

    You can find the required components for our scratch build CNC here(https://buildyourcnc.com/cnckitintro.aspx).

    Lead Screw needed will be:
    X-axis: 52 Inches
    Y-axis: 32 Inches
    Z-axis: 14 Inches

    These will be the bearings that are specified that will be needed:
    Bearings 1/2" Inside Diameter - 6
    Bearings 5/16" Inside Diameter - 24

    Click the link to respond:
    Hi, I need the lead screws and bearings for the 4' x-axis, the 2'(?) y-axis and the 1'(?) z-axis as specified in the book 'Build your own cnc'. I am not sure which to order on your website. Thanks

  • I bought Mach 4 and Mach 3 USB Motion card STB4100. The installation Manual you direct me to is for installing board with Mach3. Where can I find directions for the combination of products I bought? The axis motors are held stationary by the magnets but when I try to jog an axis from mach 4 program, no movement.

    The fact that you cannot move the motors with the keyboard serves as a clue to a couple possibilities.

    - The software may not be communicating with parallel port. (One possibility may be that your step pins are not low active, or vice versa depending on your drivers).
    - You may not be in the correct tab of Mach3. Make sure you are in the Program Run tab.
    - The jog on/off button on the program run screen may not be lit (invoked).

    This address below shows the complete troubleshooting for this type of situation. It will show how to test each pin at the parallel port at the back of the computer and everything else associated with correctly wiring the electronics.

    https://buildyourcnc.com/CNCElectronicsandWiring.aspx




    Additional Information:
    6 axis robot with Mach3 Card 6 Axis Motion Controller

    Click the link to respond:
    I bought Mach 4 and Mach 3 USB Motion card STB4100. The installation Manual you direct me to is for installing board with Mach3. Where can I find directions for the combination of products I bought? The axis motors are held stationary by the magnets but when I try to jog an axis from mach 4 program, no movement.

  • I bought Mach 4 and Mach 3 USB Motion card STB4100. The installation Manual you direct me to is for installing board with Mach3. Where can I find directions for the combination of products I bought? The axis motors are held stationary by the magnets but when I try to jog an axis from mach 4 program, no movement.
  • Hi, I have intention of purchasing your 1/2 inch precision lead screw set to build my CNC machine, could I have the schematic dimension of your 1/2 inch anti-backlash nut, bearing for the lead screw and the shim? Also is your 2.2kW spindle able to mill Aluminum and what is the accuracy?

    BYCNC response:

    Milling aluminum is no problem with our machines.

    Here is a video we recently did with our 4'x8' machine. The aluminum piece is about 1/4" thick: https://buildyourcnc.com/tutorials/tutorial-greenbull-aluminum-cutting

    The accuracy you will see from our our 2.2kW spindle is entirely dependent on the precision of your build, so it's not possible to say what level of accuracy you can achieve without an examination of the complete system. However, our spindles have a runout of less than .0001 in, which includes the collets that we sell. If you use a collet from another manufacturer, we cannot guarantee this TIR (Total Indicated Runout) dimension.

    For the dimension drawing of the anti-backlash nut, please contact us directly by phone or email to techsupport@buildyourcnc.com

    User response:
    I have emailed waiting for your reply.

    User response:
    Hi, I am still waiting for your email reply.

    BYCNC response:
    Your email has been sent.

    Click the link to respond:
    Hi, I have intention of purchasing your 1/2 inch precision lead screw set to build my CNC machine, could I have the schematic dimension of your 1/2 inch anti-backlash nut, bearing for the lead screw and the shim? Also is your 2.2kW spindle able to mill Aluminum and what is the accuracy?