[ Log In ]
[ Register ]
NEW: CNC Router PLANS Available for all of our Newest CNC Models!! Click here to "Design Your CNC".

Question #: 428

Question: HOW DO I SET UP MY MOTOR DRIVERS?

Current Solution

blueChick:

X-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

Y-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

Z-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 10101100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

blackToe:

X-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

Y-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

Z-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 10101100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

blackFoot:

X-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

Y-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

Z-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 10101100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

greenBull:

X-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

Y-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
Dipswitches: 01100110
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

Z-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
Dipswitches: 01100100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

Respond:

Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • I need to determine steps/inch mach3 setup information for my motors and drivers.

    blueChick:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackToe:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackFoot:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    greenBull:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in


    Scratch-Build / Book-Build Kit:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    Scratch built/book CNC with NEMA 34 motors and CW8060 microstep driver

    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    I need to determine steps/inch mach3 setup information for my motors and drivers.

  • how to connect the parallel breakout board to the stepping motor drivers

    The very best way to explain how to connect the parallel breakout board is to follow these tutorials on this site: https://buildyourcnc.com/CNCElectronicsandWiring.aspx#prettyPhoto

    Click the link to respond:
    how to connect the parallel breakout board to the stepping motor drivers

  • HOW MANY STEPS PER INCH DO I SET IN MOTOR TUNING?

    blueChick:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackToe:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackFoot:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    greenBull:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in


    Scratch-Build / Book-Build Kit:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    Scratch built/book CNC with NEMA 34 motors and CW8060 microstep driver

    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW MANY STEPS PER INCH DO I SET IN MOTOR TUNING?

  • 3d printer motors not moving fast enough. How should I configure the motor drivers?

    This will depend on the 3D printer that you are using and the mechanics involved. Specifically regarding the motor drivers, software is really what determines the speed of the motor. If the computer is not able to product the high number of pulses that is required for faster motion, then you can reduce the microstepping and configure the software appropriately for the new microstepping so the resolution is corrected (steps/inch or steps/mm).

    Click the link to respond:
    3d printer motors not moving fast enough. How should I configure the motor drivers?

  • How do I connect my motor wires to the driver?

    Use the datasheet associated to the motor that you purchased. Use the bipolar parallel configuration to optimum performance. The datasheets are located in their respective motor product pages. Just click on the motion electronics at the left and scroll down to the motor you have and click on the title, or datasheet link next to the motor. The datasheet will either be in the form of a pdf, or within the instructions on that product page.

    Additional Information:
    wiring diagram

    Click the link to respond:
    How do I connect my motor wires to the driver?

  • How do I setup a raid for my hard drives on Ubuntu?

    1) Make sure to setup Primary partition:

    Primary
    Beginning of this space
    Ext4
    Mount point: /
    and Swap partition:

    Logical
    Beginning of this space
    Swap area using "Something Else"

    2) get and install updates and upgrades

    sudo apt-get update
    sudo apt-get upgrade

    3) get raid software

    sudo apt-get update
    sudo apt-get install mdadm

    4) setup RAID

    a) if raids haven't been setup:
    sudo mdadm --create /dev/md0 --chunk=256 --level=0 --raid-devices=2 /dev/sda /dev/sdb

    b) if raids are setup, but just have to be reassembled:
    sudo mdadm --assemble /dev/md0 /dev/sda /dev/sdb

    or

    mdadm --assemble --scan

    Click the link to respond:
    How do I setup a raid for my hard drives on Ubuntu?

  • Can I have two motors and drivers on a single axis?

    Yes, you can have two drivers connected to a single axis. If you want the two drivers/motors to work as a single, more concerted pair, then I would suggest connecting the two drivers to a single step pulse and direction signal.

    That is to say:
    driver 1 and driver 2 have wires connecting from the CP terminals of the drivers to a single step terminal on the interface board (USB or parallel breakout board), and the CW terminals of the drivers connected to a single direction terminal on the interface board.

    If the motors need to spin in the opposite directions, simply reverse one of the the motor A B coil connections (i.e. wires that would go to A+ and A- is connected to the B+ and B-, and the same with the B+ and B- to the A+ and A-). You can alternatively resolve this mechanically if desired.

    Click the link to respond:
    Can I have two motors and drivers on a single axis?

  • how do you hook up the 100 oz-in motor wires to the driver?

    Black - A+, Green A-, Red B+, Blue B-

    Click the link to respond:
    how do you hook up the 100 oz-in motor wires to the driver?

  • I bought a, 3-Axis NEMA23 CNC Kit (36V/9.7A/382oz-in/KL-4030.but dont know how to set the dip switches on my drivers. The place I bout the kit from isent very good and support.

    That driver (not purchased here) is a standard 3.0 amp driver that will have the dip switch settings on the top of the driver. You will need to determine the amp rating of you motor for the scheme that you wire your motor to the driver (bipolar parallel is recommended in most circumstances but can depend on your power supply output). Check the stepping motor datasheet for your motor to determine this amp rating.

    The other set of switches will be configure the microstepping. This will depend on your mechanical setup (i.e. lead screw, rack and pinion, roller chain, timing belt, etc.) and the specifications of such mechanical parts.

    This general formula (which can be searched using the Customer Service Live with many examples): step/inch = (natural motor steps * desired microsteps) / (mechanical travel for one motor rotation)

    Click the link to respond:
    I bought a, 3-Axis NEMA23 CNC Kit (36V/9.7A/382oz-in/KL-4030.but dont know how to set the dip switches on my drivers. The place I bout the kit from isent very good and support.

  • I'm building my own machine using your motors and drivers. What is the best dip switch settings for the 3.0 amp drivers powering the 425 oz motors

    The settings that you will use for your 3.0 amp driver to properly power and turn your 425 oz-in stepper motor will cheifly depend on your application and the mechanical parts you are using on your machine. In all circumstances, the amp setting for the stepper motor (according to the datasheet) should be 2.8 amps. Use the closest setting on the driver without going over.

    Here is a good rule of thumb for the microstepping which will correspond to the resolution, but wil also affect torque. You always want to try to achieve the best torque and resolution for the axis you are moving but go with the lowest microstepping possible. In cases where there is mechanical advantage, like a lead screw scenario, where for each motor revolution, the axis move a very small amount, you will want a very low microstep value. This is because the mechanical configuration will provide most of the finer resolution and you will not need the microstepping to assist in this. Increase the microstepping only in conditions where the axis is not moving smooth enough, or where there is a mechanical disadvantage. A mechanical disadvantage would be where the stepper motor is causing a great amount of movement in the axis and the resolutions suffers from this condition. Increase the microstep value up to your desired resolution, but don't go over since the torque of the motor will decrease.

    Click the link to respond:
    I'm building my own machine using your motors and drivers. What is the best dip switch settings for the 3.0 amp drivers powering the 425 oz motors

  • How do I wire two motors parallel

    To have two stepper motors move simultaneously, connect the two stepper motor drivers to the same CP (step pulse) and CW (direction) pins for that axis.

    Additional Information:
    Can you send me a wiring diagram
    kkitching@hughes.net

    Click the link to respond:
    How do I wire two motors parallel

  • How to wire drivers to pokey57

    Here is the list of videos that I created to show how to connect pokeys57CNC interface. I go over connecting the Pokeys57CNC to stepper motor drivers, connecting limit switches, connecting to the VFD (variable frequency drive) for the spindle control and even conect a laser triggering.

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6PplMTH29SETy_UYRcKQDspJOin_lzDB

    Click the link to respond:
    How to wire drivers to pokey57

  • HOW DO I DETERMINE THE AMOUNT OF SCREW WEIGTH THAT MY MOTOR CAN HANDLE

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW DO I DETERMINE THE AMOUNT OF SCREW WEIGTH THAT MY MOTOR CAN HANDLE

  • HOW DO YOU SETUP THE SPINDLE INVERTER?

    Change PD001 Source of Run Commands to '1'
    Change PD005 Max operating frequency to 400hz
    Change PD004 base frequency to 400hz
    Change PD003 Main frequency to 400hz
    Change PD006 Intermediate frequency to 2.5
    Change PD008 max voltage to 220v
    Change PD009 Intermediate voltage to 15v
    Change PD010 Min voltage to 8
    Change PD011 frequency lower limit to >100hz (120hz to start)
    Change PD142 7 Amps
    Change PD143 2
    Change PD144 3000

    Note: PD001 had to be changed back to 0 to allow for keypad control.
    Note2: I had to reverse U and V to get the spindle to go forward in FWD. (reverse any two wires, u&v or w&v for example)

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW DO YOU SETUP THE SPINDLE INVERTER?

  • How do I wire to nema 23 motors parallel

    Wiring two motors in parallel is pretty easy.

    Here are the steps:
    - You need to have two stepper motors and two stepper motor drivers.
    - Each stepper motor will be connected to its own stepper motor driver.
    - Both stepper motor drivers are connected to the same CP and CW pins on the interface so the same signal is delivered to both drivers.

    Click the link to respond:
    How do I wire to nema 23 motors parallel

  • How do I put two motors on the same axis

    Yes, you can use 2 motors in the same axis output, however you will still need a driver for that stepper motor. Also depending on the orientation on which you mount the motor you might have to invert the direction of the motor, and that will be simple by swapping the A+,A-, to the B+,B- locations and vice versa, from the driver to the motor wiring.

    The wiring scheme would look like this:
    The step and direction output terminals on the CNC controller interface for the axis you want to have two motors would connect to both drivers of the two stepper motors on that axis.

    Additional Information:
    I have been running two motors from the same driver for 10 years on my 3m x 1.6m router. Both motors driving the gantry are wired together. I see no reason to use two drivers. The motors are high torque Nema 34. I've had no issues.

    Click the link to respond:
    How do I put two motors on the same axis

  • Can i wire my drivers and motors in parallel to your laser controll system to add a laser unit on my router?

    It is possible to add the laser control system to an existing CNC router but there are a few considerations:

    All of the signal wires from the laser controller that connect to the drivers drivers and all of the signal wires from the CNC controller that go to the drivers will need to first pass through a tri-state gate buffer chip that will allow one set of signal wires to be switched off and the other set switched on.

    We have a board that does this in development, but If you wish to accomplish this on your own, you will need:

    - 3 Quad buffer line drivers (each one can receive 4 signal wires): https://newbiehack.com/categories/newbiehack-integrated_circuits-buffer-quad-buffer-line-driver-throughhole
    - Some perf board, solder and a soldering iron, and some hookup wire.

    If this doesn't scare you, please feel free to submit additional information and let me know if you would like more information.


    Additional Information:
    You will also need a physical switch to select laser control or CNC control.

    Click the link to respond:
    Can i wire my drivers and motors in parallel to your laser controll system to add a laser unit on my router?

  • HOW DO YOU SETUP THE SPINDLE INVERTER VFD?

    Change PD001 Source of Run Commands to '1'
    Change PD005 Max operating frequency to 400hz
    Change PD004 base frequency to 400hz
    Change PD003 Main frequency to 400hz
    Change PD006 Intermediate frequency to 2.5
    Change PD008 max voltage to 220v
    Change PD009 Intermediate voltage to 15v
    Change PD010 Min voltage to 8
    Change PD011 frequency lower limit to >100hz (120hz to start)
    Change PD142 7 Amps
    Change PD143 2
    Change PD144 3000

    Note: PD001 had to be changed back to 0 to allow for keypad control.
    Note2: I had to reverse U and V to get the spindle to go forward in FWD. (reverse any two wires, u&v or w&v for example)

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW DO YOU SETUP THE SPINDLE INVERTER VFD?

  • HOW CAN I KNOW MUCH WEIGHT MY MOTOR CARRY?

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW CAN I KNOW MUCH WEIGHT MY MOTOR CARRY?

Get Help with:
This Product
Orders
Tech Support
Sales
This Product
Order Query
Tech Support
Sales
Not logged in. Log In Register
Track Order(s)
View Order(s)
I Want to Schecule a One-On-One Paid Tech Support Session
Book an Appointment Pertaining to a BuildYourCNC Product (Free)
Ask a Quesion Below (Free):
Book an Appointment Pertaining Other Equipment ($60/half hour)
Book an Immedite Appointment Pertaining Other Equipment ($120/half hour)
Ask a Quesion Below (Free):
Waiting for response... I may not answer immediately, but I was notified on my cellular phone so my response is forthcoming. If I don't respond immediately, you can always go to the [My Account] page to see all of our chats at any time.