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Question #: 493

Question: THE BLACKTOE REQUIRES HOW MUCH MOTOR CABLE

Current Solution

The motor cables for the blackToe are as follows:

Total 30 feet

X - 9
Y - 10
Z - 11

Respond:

Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • HOW LONG SHOULD THE MOTOR CABLES BE FOR BLACKTOE

    The motor cables for the blackToe are as follows:

    Total 30 feet

    X - 9
    Y - 10
    Z - 11

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW LONG SHOULD THE MOTOR CABLES BE FOR BLACKTOE

  • HOW MUCH MOTOR CABLE FOR THE BLACKFOOT?

    The motor cables for the blackToe are as follows:

    Total 30 feet

    X - 9
    Y - 10
    Z - 11

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW MUCH MOTOR CABLE FOR THE BLACKFOOT?

  • BLACKTOE REQUIRED HOW MUCH CABLE

    The motor cables for the blackToe are as follows:

    Total 30 feet

    X - 9
    Y - 10
    Z - 11

    Click the link to respond:
    BLACKTOE REQUIRED HOW MUCH CABLE

  • HOW MUCH MOTOR CABLE SHOULD PURCHASE FOR THE BLUECHICK

    The recommended total length of motor cable should be 15 feet for the blueChick v4.2

    Z - 6 feet
    Y - 5 feet
    X- 4 feet

    20 AWG 4 conductor

    If your drivers will be positioned farther from the machine, you may need longer cable.

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW MUCH MOTOR CABLE SHOULD PURCHASE FOR THE BLUECHICK

  • BLACKTOE MOTOR CABLE LENGTH

    The motor cables for the blackToe are as follows:

    Total 30 feet

    X - 9
    Y - 10
    Z - 11

    Click the link to respond:
    BLACKTOE MOTOR CABLE LENGTH

  • BLACKTOE MOTOR CABLE LENGTH

    The total length of cable for the greenBull 5x is 50 ft.
    Now the individual lengths for all three axis, is x=15 ft, y=17 ft, z=18 ft.

    Click the link to respond:
    BLACKTOE MOTOR CABLE LENGTH

  • HOW MUCH MOTOR CABLE DO I NEED FOR A BLACKFOOT

    The blackfoot requires a total of 50 feet of cable.

    The X axis needs 15 feet
    The Y axis needs 17 feet
    and the Z-axis needs 18 feet

    These are 20 gauge 4 conductor cable.

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW MUCH MOTOR CABLE DO I NEED FOR A BLACKFOOT

  • BLACKTOE MOTOR CABLES

    The motor cables for the blackToe are as follows:

    Total 30 feet

    X - 9
    Y - 10
    Z - 11

    Click the link to respond:
    BLACKTOE MOTOR CABLES

  • BLACKTOE MOTOR CABLE

    The motor cables for the blackToe are as follows:

    Total 30 feet

    X - 9
    Y - 10
    Z - 11

    Click the link to respond:
    BLACKTOE MOTOR CABLE

  • WHAT CABLE LENGTHS ARE USED FOR THE BLACKTOE

    The motor cables for the blackToe are as follows:

    Total 30 feet

    X - 9
    Y - 10
    Z - 11

    Click the link to respond:
    WHAT CABLE LENGTHS ARE USED FOR THE BLACKTOE

  • WHAT CABLE LENGTHS SHOULD USE FOR THE BLACKTOE

    The motor cables for the blackToe are as follows:

    Total 30 feet

    X - 9
    Y - 10
    Z - 11

    Click the link to respond:
    WHAT CABLE LENGTHS SHOULD USE FOR THE BLACKTOE

  • WHAT ARE THE CABLE LENGTHS FOR BLACKTOE

    The motor cables for the blackToe are as follows:

    Total 30 feet

    X - 9
    Y - 10
    Z - 11

    Click the link to respond:
    WHAT ARE THE CABLE LENGTHS FOR BLACKTOE

  • WHAT ARE THE CABLE LENGTHS FOR BLACKTOE

    The motor cables for the blackToe are as follows:

    Total 30 feet

    X - 9
    Y - 10
    Z - 11

    Click the link to respond:
    WHAT ARE THE CABLE LENGTHS FOR BLACKTOE

  • IF WE ASSUME DESIRE TO PLACE THE RED LEAF 6' AWAY FROM TABLE, HOW MUCH CABLE IS NEEDED CONNECT MOTORS ON TABLE ITSELF?

    blackToe requires a minimum cable length of of 15 ft for X, 17 ft for Y and 18 ft for Z for the redLeaf to be positioned at midpoint along the long axis and under the table. Each axis would need have 6 feet extra (form the midpoint)

    Click the link to respond:
    IF WE ASSUME DESIRE TO PLACE THE RED LEAF 6' AWAY FROM TABLE, HOW MUCH CABLE IS NEEDED CONNECT MOTORS ON TABLE ITSELF?

  • The mach3 USB card requires 24V, how do I supply this?

    If you are using a spindle with a VFD, there is a 24 volt power supply that will provide the correct power for the V+ and V- on the Mach3 USB. The 12V option is only if you are using the limit switches on that side of the board, but if you are using it to control spindle speed and for the outputs, it's best to use a 24V power supply, or the 24V output on the VFD.

    Additional Information:
    Closed loop

    Click the link to respond:
    The mach3 USB card requires 24V, how do I supply this?

  • I HAVE BLACKTOE 4.1 WITH PORTER CABLE 890 ROUTER.TO CONVERT TO SPINDLE(2.2KW) CAN JUST CHANGE THE MOUNT?

    If you would like to use a spindle rather than a router on your existing CNC, we will send you another set of components that will allow the spindle to be mounted properly which includes the z-axis rails, rail support, spindle mounts and the dust shoe components. You can find this item to purchase here: https://www.buildyourcnc.com/category/z-axis

    Click the link to respond:
    I HAVE BLACKTOE 4.1 WITH PORTER CABLE 890 ROUTER.TO CONVERT TO SPINDLE(2.2KW) CAN JUST CHANGE THE MOUNT?

  • I have blacktoe 4.1 with porter cable 890 router.To convert to spindle(2.2kw) can I just change the mount?

    If you would like to use a spindle rather than a router on your existing CNC, we will send you another set of components that will allow the spindle to be mounted properly which includes the z-axis rails, rail support, spindle mounts and the dust shoe components. You can find this item to purchase here: https://www.buildyourcnc.com/category/z-axis

    Click the link to respond:
    I have blacktoe 4.1 with porter cable 890 router.To convert to spindle(2.2kw) can I just change the mount?

  • how much weight can my stepping motor lift?

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    how much weight can my stepping motor lift?

  • HOW CAN I KNOW MUCH WEIGHT MY MOTOR CARRY?

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW CAN I KNOW MUCH WEIGHT MY MOTOR CARRY?