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Question #: 941

Question: I need to determine steps/inch mach3 setup information for my motors and drivers.

Current Solution

blueChick:

X-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

Y-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

Z-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 10101100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

blackToe:

X-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

Y-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

Z-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 10101100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

blackFoot:

X-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

Y-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

Z-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 10101100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

greenBull:

X-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

Y-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
Dipswitches: 01100110
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

Z-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
Dipswitches: 01100100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in


Scratch-Build / Book-Build Kit:

X-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 10101100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

Y-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 10101100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

Z-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 10101100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

Additional Information:


Additional Information:
Scratch built/book CNC with NEMA 34 motors and CW8060 microstep driver

Additional Information:

Respond:

Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • got my stepper motors wired to the information on your website using USB Bob and the motors don't step they keep turning like an old drill until they stop

    So, if I understand correctly, the stepping motor will turn on command, but the motor will only turn in one direction. Check the output of your direction signal wire. Check the wire voltage when you command the motor to turn on one direction in the planet-cnc software. Then check the voltage when you command the motor to turn in the other direction. The voltage should be different in each case.

    Click the link to respond:
    got my stepper motors wired to the information on your website using USB Bob and the motors don't step they keep turning like an old drill until they stop

  • I am upgrading a CNC with 3 stepping motors, and its all I want to keep. What technical information do you need in order to receive a quotation from you with the new items I need to buy from you?

    Dealing with your CNC upgrade we will need a good detail on exactly what you plan on keeping and reusing, all technical information about the parts that you keep will make our recommendations more precise for your application.

    Please email customerservice@buildyourcnc.com for any quote related questions.

    Click the link to respond:
    I am upgrading a CNC with 3 stepping motors, and its all I want to keep. What technical information do you need in order to receive a quotation from you with the new items I need to buy from you?

  • HOW CAN I DETERMINE STEPS/INCH, VELOCITY AND ACCELERATION?

    In the customer service live, just enter "motor tuning" and it will give you a list of all the recommended or default settings for our machines. However the acceleration and velocity for the greenBull(other machines) will be an actual determination on your trials. You will want the highest possible acceleration and velocity without the motors stalling, so you can do increments of ten to be on the safe side, if it is too slow try increments of 25.

    The steps per inch is dependent on the microstepping:
    Steps/Inch for the x and y
    Steps = 200 motor steps per revolution x 16 microsteps = 3200 steps
    Inches = sprocket number of teeth x pitch of the sprocket = 14 x .25" = 3.5 inches
    steps/inch = 3200 / 3.5 = 914.28
    This is really a starting point. You will then need to use the mach3 calibration function to get the perfect steps/inch value. Use as long a measurement as possible when calibrating.

    Velocity:
    Start with a value of 1000 ipm. Increase this value with a relatively low acceleration at about 10. You will notice at a particular velocity that it will stall. This is your stall velocity. I would take the stall velocity and reduce it by about 30% to 50% which should give you a good final safe velocity.

    Acceleration:
    Once the velocity is found, raise the acceleration until it start to stall at a low velocity. Reduce the acceleration by about the same percentage to stick with a safe acceleration.

    The acceleration is mostly dependent on torque (current) and the top speed is dependent on the amount of voltage.

    Give some tests with all of the axes running at the same time. If you notice and stalling, reduce velocities and acceleration depending on when the stall happens (top end, or acceleration curve).


    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    4th axis


    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW CAN I DETERMINE STEPS/INCH, VELOCITY AND ACCELERATION?

  • How can I determine steps/inch, velocity and acceleration?

    In the customer service live, just enter "motor tuning" and it will give you a list of all the recommended or default settings for our machines. However the acceleration and velocity for the greenBull(other machines) will be an actual determination on your trials. You will want the highest possible acceleration and velocity without the motors stalling, so you can do increments of ten to be on the safe side, if it is too slow try increments of 25.

    The steps per inch is dependent on the microstepping:
    Steps/Inch for the x and y
    Steps = 200 motor steps per revolution x 16 microsteps = 3200 steps
    Inches = sprocket number of teeth x pitch of the sprocket = 14 x .25" = 3.5 inches
    steps/inch = 3200 / 3.5 = 914.28
    This is really a starting point. You will then need to use the mach3 calibration function to get the perfect steps/inch value. Use as long a measurement as possible when calibrating.

    Velocity:
    Start with a value of 1000 ipm. Increase this value with a relatively low acceleration at about 10. You will notice at a particular velocity that it will stall. This is your stall velocity. I would take the stall velocity and reduce it by about 30% to 50% which should give you a good final safe velocity.

    Acceleration:
    Once the velocity is found, raise the acceleration until it start to stall at a low velocity. Reduce the acceleration by about the same percentage to stick with a safe acceleration.

    The acceleration is mostly dependent on torque (current) and the top speed is dependent on the amount of voltage.

    Give some tests with all of the axes running at the same time. If you notice and stalling, reduce velocities and acceleration depending on when the stall happens (top end, or acceleration curve).


    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    4th axis


    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    How can I determine steps/inch, velocity and acceleration?

  • I bought your 3 axis combo and need to know what name brand is the motors and their ounces and the drivers

    Surely you know the brand motors you sold me?

    Click the link to respond:
    I bought your 3 axis combo and need to know what name brand is the motors and their ounces and the drivers

  • I have a project very similar to cnc machine. I need 3 lead screws of 1.8 m with all set (supports, bearings...etc). and 3 NEMA 42 motors that I can connect with. if those are available, I need the information about shipping to Oman or UAE.
  • I'm building my own machine using your motors and drivers. What is the best dip switch settings for the 3.0 amp drivers powering the 425 oz motors

    The settings that you will use for your 3.0 amp driver to properly power and turn your 425 oz-in stepper motor will cheifly depend on your application and the mechanical parts you are using on your machine. In all circumstances, the amp setting for the stepper motor (according to the datasheet) should be 2.8 amps. Use the closest setting on the driver without going over.

    Here is a good rule of thumb for the microstepping which will correspond to the resolution, but wil also affect torque. You always want to try to achieve the best torque and resolution for the axis you are moving but go with the lowest microstepping possible. In cases where there is mechanical advantage, like a lead screw scenario, where for each motor revolution, the axis move a very small amount, you will want a very low microstep value. This is because the mechanical configuration will provide most of the finer resolution and you will not need the microstepping to assist in this. Increase the microstepping only in conditions where the axis is not moving smooth enough, or where there is a mechanical disadvantage. A mechanical disadvantage would be where the stepper motor is causing a great amount of movement in the axis and the resolutions suffers from this condition. Increase the microstep value up to your desired resolution, but don't go over since the torque of the motor will decrease.

    Click the link to respond:
    I'm building my own machine using your motors and drivers. What is the best dip switch settings for the 3.0 amp drivers powering the 425 oz motors

  • I am missing the wiring information for the 1.5kw spindle, my electrician says I need documentation for the 4 prong connector into the VFD

    You can find wiring diagrams and illustrations for the spindle on this page: https://buildyourcnc.com/item/spindle-inverter-2!2kw-spindle-novfd

    This information pertains to the 2.2 kW spindle; however, the wiring is the same for the other spindles as well.

    Click the link to respond:
    I am missing the wiring information for the 1.5kw spindle, my electrician says I need documentation for the 4 prong connector into the VFD

  • Can i wire my drivers and motors in parallel to your laser controll system to add a laser unit on my router?

    It is possible to add the laser control system to an existing CNC router but there are a few considerations:

    All of the signal wires from the laser controller that connect to the drivers drivers and all of the signal wires from the CNC controller that go to the drivers will need to first pass through a tri-state gate buffer chip that will allow one set of signal wires to be switched off and the other set switched on.

    We have a board that does this in development, but If you wish to accomplish this on your own, you will need:

    - 3 Quad buffer line drivers (each one can receive 4 signal wires): https://newbiehack.com/categories/newbiehack-integrated_circuits-buffer-quad-buffer-line-driver-throughhole
    - Some perf board, solder and a soldering iron, and some hookup wire.

    If this doesn't scare you, please feel free to submit additional information and let me know if you would like more information.


    Additional Information:
    You will also need a physical switch to select laser control or CNC control.

    Click the link to respond:
    Can i wire my drivers and motors in parallel to your laser controll system to add a laser unit on my router?

  • how do I determine the steps per inch for the motors?

    blueChick:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackToe:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackFoot:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    greenBull:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in


    Scratch-Build / Book-Build Kit:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    Scratch built/book CNC with NEMA 34 motors and CW8060 microstep driver

    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    how do I determine the steps per inch for the motors?

  • For tuning the motors in mach 3 should I be running a gcode or is keyboard jogging enough to determine the stall rates

    It seems to be getting some kind of interference or a short within the wiring or communication, try jogging the motors in the software without anything wired to the board. Then add one motor at a time to see if there is a short within your wiring or a faulty driver/motor.
    If the USB breakout board continues to move the x-axis with no motors or driver wired to it, please email customerservice@buildyourcnc.com for a replacement or further troubleshooting.

    Click the link to respond:
    For tuning the motors in mach 3 should I be running a gcode or is keyboard jogging enough to determine the stall rates

  • For tuning the motors in mach 3 should I be running a gcode or is keyboard jogging enough to determine the stall rates

    Keyboard jogging will give you a good start at motor tuning since going from a stop to rapid travel speed is the quickest the machine will be required to accelerate. However, best practice is to also run test files and actually cut the type of materials you expect to deal with to test machine performance under load and make any fine adjustments needed for maximum performance.

    Click the link to respond:
    For tuning the motors in mach 3 should I be running a gcode or is keyboard jogging enough to determine the stall rates

  • Im having software setup problems with my backtooth (mach3) and i seem not to find a solution in the forum. what can i do?

    You can call us, send an email, or pose the specific question on this customer service live that pertains to the issue that you are having.

    Click the link to respond:
    Im having software setup problems with my backtooth (mach3) and i seem not to find a solution in the forum. what can i do?

  • I AM TAKING THE FINAL YEAR PROJECT IN BASE STATIONS AND AIR INTERFACE. WOULD LIKE TO HAVE SOME INFORMATION.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is the primary federal agency responsible for safety aspects of modern-day wireless telecommunications systems. The FCC's Internet address is shown below. Recently FCC published an excellent report, cited below, to assist citizens and local governments dealing with siting of telecommuncations towers. This report contains charts and figures describing the characteristics and performance of telecommunications antennas. The report also contains practical guidance on application of provisions of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, which is the governing legislation regarding safety and siting of wireless telelcommunications facilities. Web page: RF Safety Program Page. Report title: "A Local Government Official's Guide to Transmitting Antenna RF Emission Safety: Rules, Procedures, and Practical Guidance." The Local and State Government Advisory Committee (LSGAC) and the FCC have developed this guide to aid local governmental officials and citizens in understanding safety issues related to radiofrequency emissions from telecommunications towers. Gary Zeman, Sc.D., CHP Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Click the link to respond:
    I AM TAKING THE FINAL YEAR PROJECT IN BASE STATIONS AND AIR INTERFACE. WOULD LIKE TO HAVE SOME INFORMATION.

  • A VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT (VIS) MANDATORY OR IT ONLY RECOMMENDED WHEN ADMINISTERING INFLUENZA VACCINE?

    As of January 1, 2006, the use of a VIS for influenza vaccine given to a child or an adult became mandatory under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. Two VISs are published annually, one for LAIV and one for TIV. Each can be found at www.immunize.org/vis along with many translations.

    Click the link to respond:
    A VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT (VIS) MANDATORY OR IT ONLY RECOMMENDED WHEN ADMINISTERING INFLUENZA VACCINE?

  • I'm planning a rack and pinion style gantry, and need clarification on how to slave a second stepper to the Y (or X). Can you direct me to that information for your products?

    There are two things to consider when using two stepping motors on a single axis. Since you want both motors to spin at the same rate and possibly in the same direction, you need to connect both motor drivers to the same breakout board pins. For example, if you want two motors on the x-axis and the x-axis pins on the breakout board are #2 for step and #3 for direction, the #2 will connect to the step (cp) terminal on each driver and the #3 will connect to the dir (cw) terminal on each driver.

    However, if the motors will be opposing (one motor will need to spin in the other direction), you will need to consider either flipping the rack on one side, or adding a circuit to invert the direction (#3) signal going to that driver.

    Click the link to respond:
    I'm planning a rack and pinion style gantry, and need clarification on how to slave a second stepper to the Y (or X). Can you direct me to that information for your products?

  • What is the best way to determine speeds and feeds for machine and bit longevity?

    The speeds and feeds are generally based on the amount of flutes that are being used per pass and how hot the end mill is getting when milling.  You want to use as much of the flutes as possible on single cuts.  Make the deepest cuts you can to increase the life of the tool.  For instance, if a tool that is 1 inch in cut length and the depth per pass is 1/4", then only that 1/4" is being used for the cutting.  The 1/4" tip of that tool will wear faster.  
    Make sure the feedrate is as fast as possible without a cost to the edge finish.  This will keep the end mill cool since there will be minimal friction as you are always cutting into fresh cooler material.  
    Use the end mill manufacturer's chip load for the tool to determine the starting feed rate.

    Feedrate (IPM - Inches/Min) = Spindle RPM x # of Flutes x Chip Load
    See each end mill for the chip load value.

    If your machine cannot achieve these feed rates, reduce the spindle RPM using this formula:
    Speed (RPM) = Feed Rate (IPM) / (# of Flutes x Chip Load)

    Click the link to respond:
    What is the best way to determine speeds and feeds for machine and bit longevity?

  • I need wiring diagram for motor to driver to usb motion card. I cannot find diagram. I have been unable to get information for a week.
  • I am asking what to set my steps per using your kit stepper motors and a 1/2"x13 lead screw with Mach3

    Here is the formula for steps/inch (steps per inch)

    Steps = how many steps for a full ration of the motor = standard motor steps x number of microsteps for each step
    Standard motor steps for our stepping motors is 200 steps per revolution.
    Microsteps are selected on the driver and are shown as full, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32 etc... Use the denominator for the number of microsteps per step.

    Inches = how far the travel is for one full rotation of the motor. For the 1/2" - 13 TPI (threads per inch), the travel length will be 1"/13 or .076923". So, for one revolution of the motor, the travel distance will be .076923 inches.

    So, the steps = 200 * microsteps, let's make this 1/4 just for the formula.
    The inches will be .076923. Plug those into the formula:
    Steps / inch = (200 * 4) / .076923 This can also be written as:
    200 * 4 / (1 / 13) = 10,400

    Click the link to respond:
    I am asking what to set my steps per using your kit stepper motors and a 1/2"x13 lead screw with Mach3