[ Log In ]
[ Register ]
NEW: CNC Router PLANS Available for all of our Newest CNC Models!! Click here to "Design Your CNC".

Question #: 13521

Question: Can you supply a "KIT" to convert my 4060Z CNC to a Laser Cutter? What is the difference capabilities between the 40Watt and 80Watt?

Current Solution

We can supply all of the laser components, but you will need to determine how to mount the components.

Additional Information:
Alternatively, you can purchase our greenBull machine that has the laser/spindle combo head. You can see the laser/spindle head here: https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/cnc-machine-laser-spindle-combo-head

Respond:

Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • Can you supply a "KIT" to convert my 4060Z CNC to a Laser Cutter? What is the difference capabilities between the 40Watt and 80Watt?

    We can supply all of the laser components, but you will need to determine how to mount the components.

    Additional Information:
    Alternatively, you can purchase our greenBull machine that has the laser/spindle combo head. You can see the laser/spindle head here: https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/cnc-machine-laser-spindle-combo-head

    Click the link to respond:
    Can you supply a "KIT" to convert my 4060Z CNC to a Laser Cutter? What is the difference capabilities between the 40Watt and 80Watt?

  • I was wondering what was the difference between the two pair of goggles you are selling for the blacktooth. The tinted laser goggles and the Honeywell laser CO2 goggles

    The Honeywell brand goggles meet ANSI certification Z136.1, relating to the safe use of lasers, and are calibrated to optimally block the specific wavelengths of light produced by CO2 lasers (the details are available in the website description here: https://buildyourcnc.com/item/laser-components-goggles-safety-honeywell.) The generic tinted goggles also block the specific CO2 laser wavelengths, but a good deal of other wavelengths as well. That and frame style variation is the basic difference.

    Click the link to respond:
    I was wondering what was the difference between the two pair of goggles you are selling for the blacktooth. The tinted laser goggles and the Honeywell laser CO2 goggles

  • I am looking at 2 of your motor drivers. 1 is the 1/64 step and the other is 1/256. What is the difference between the two?

    Stepper motors are designed to move in specific increments; these increments are called "steps". For example, a common standard is for 200 steps per full revolution. Microstepping is a method to send signals to the motor to move only a fraction of a full step at a time. For example, if a motor has 200 steps per revolution and is microstepped 1/16, then effectively there are 3200 small step movements (microsteps) per revolution instead of 200 larger ones. This makes the motion of the motor much smoother and more precisely controllable, at the cost of decreased holding torque.

    Here are is a good references for stepper motor theory: http://users.ece.utexas.edu/~valvano/Datasheets/StepperMicrostep.pdf

    And Wikipedia has a good overview as well:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stepper_motor

    Click the link to respond:
    I am looking at 2 of your motor drivers. 1 is the 1/64 step and the other is 1/256. What is the difference between the two?

  • What tolerance can I expect from your largest cnc machine and the laser cutter? Also, what depth can I get on the z axis?

    The largest CNC machine we make at this time (12/04/2015) is the GreenBull 6'x12' model. This model has 2 options for Z-axis travel.

    The short-z option has a total Z travel of 5.75 inches. From that you would subtract the length of the end mill used and the thickness of the spoil board to determine the maximum material thickness. (Example: If the end mill extends 1.25" from the collet and the spoil board is .75", then the material could be up to 5.75 - 1.25 - 0.75 = 3.75 inches in thickness). This is good for most sheet-type materials.

    The long-z option, used mainly for large 3D carvings, requires a custom frame and allows for up to 36" of travel.

    The tolerance of our machines, like any machine, depends on several variables. The major variables include the manufacturing tolerance, the type of machine control used, the precision of assembly, the thoroughness of maintenance, and the initial and ongoing calibration of the machine. Because we sell kits only most of these variables are outside our control. Therefore, we are hesitant to guarantee a certain level of tolerance for an end user. However, in our experience, tolerances of .001" are readily achievable with our machines.

    Click the link to respond:
    What tolerance can I expect from your largest cnc machine and the laser cutter? Also, what depth can I get on the z axis?

  • I can't spot the differences between 4'x8' blackFoot and the 4'x8' greenBull (except for laser head option): please, can you tell me?

    Only our greenBull CNC machines will be able to use the long Z-axis, due to structural construction of the greenBull over the blackFoot.
    The height from the table top to the bottom of the gantry is: 4.25"

    Both the maximum cutting height and diameter, will be dependent on the specific end mill/router bit you plan on using, since they can vary in length.
    The maximum cutting height (useful to engrave or cut material)is: with spoil-board 3.875", without a spoil-board is 4.625"
    The maximum diameter will (estimated) is: 3"

    Specifically dealing with our greenBull long Z-axis CNC machines, depending on how you specifically design the table you can have more cutting height and a larger diameter clearance. If you only create a frame for the machine with a hollow center(adjustable midsection), allowing you to have a greater clearance.
    Similar table image here: (https://buildyourcnc.com/Item/cnc-machine-greenBull-v4-6X#prettyPhoto/5/)

    Click the link to respond:
    I can't spot the differences between 4'x8' blackFoot and the 4'x8' greenBull (except for laser head option): please, can you tell me?

  • What is the difference between a NEMA 23 and NEMA 24 motor? can I use either one on a machine?

    The frame size difference of the NEMA 23 and 24 is very slight and, depending on the motor mount both will most likely fit. The bigger difference between these stepping motors is the torque. Make sure that the motor that you purchase has the appropriate torque for the axis that it will move.

    Is is safe to go with the higher torque? Or if the torque is too high for what i need is that bad?

    You can use a motor with higher torque. Just make sure to select the correct driver for that motor.

    Additional Information:
    The frame size has nothing to do with torque. Nema 23 means a 2.3" frame. Nema 24 means a 2.4" frame. That's all. Either could have more or less torque depending on speed and power.

    Click the link to respond:
    What is the difference between a NEMA 23 and NEMA 24 motor? can I use either one on a machine?

  • What is the difference between a NEMA 23 and NEMA 24 motor? can I use either one on a machine?

    The frame size difference of the NEMA 23 and 24 is very slight and, depending on the motor mount both will most likely fit. The bigger difference between these stepping motors is the torque. Make sure that the motor that you purchase has the appropriate torque for the axis that it will move.

    Is is safe to go with the higher torque? Or if the torque is too high for what i need is that bad?

    You can use a motor with higher torque. Just make sure to select the correct driver for that motor.

    Additional Information:
    The frame size has nothing to do with torque. Nema 23 means a 2.3" frame. Nema 24 means a 2.4" frame. That's all. Either could have more or less torque depending on speed and power.

    Click the link to respond:
    What is the difference between a NEMA 23 and NEMA 24 motor? can I use either one on a machine?

  • What resolution and level of repeatability can one usually expect from a kit-built cnc, and is there a significant difference between timing belt and chain drive systems?

    Repeatability is very good for these machines and can be as low as .001" depending on the way you control the machine. If you use the spindle, you can be moderately aggressive, but you will want to use a finishing pass to make sure the edges are exactly what you would expect. since this is a kit, there will be varying levels of repeatibility depending on how well the kit is assembled and maintained. Calibration, as with all machines, is a critical aspect of keeping repeatibility over time.

    Timing belts and chain are about the same when it comes to precision as long as the chain wraps most of the drive sprocket. There are differences to each of these systems as Kevlar with steel cables impregnated within the Kevlar and the steel used in roller chain have different coefficients of linear expansion (the expansion and contraction over temperature change), and roller chain may stretch over time, so it is important to maintain the machine by tensioning the chain and timing belt, and calibrating the machine over time and when the temperature changes significantly.

    Click the link to respond:
    What resolution and level of repeatability can one usually expect from a kit-built cnc, and is there a significant difference between timing belt and chain drive systems?

  • What is the difference between the tinted laser goggles and the Honeywell laser CO2 goggles

    The Honeywell brand goggles meet ANSI certification Z136.1, relating to the safe use of lasers, and are calibrated to optimally block the specific wavelengths of light produced by CO2 lasers (the details are available in the website description here: https://buildyourcnc.com/item/laser-components-goggles-safety-honeywell.) The generic tinted goggles also block the specific CO2 laser wavelengths, but a good deal of other wavelengths as well. That and frame style variation is the basic difference.

    Click the link to respond:
    What is the difference between the tinted laser goggles and the Honeywell laser CO2 goggles

  • I am looking at 2 of your drivers. 1 is the 1/64 step and the other is 1/256. What is the difference between the two?

    Stepper motors are designed to move in specific increments; these increments are called "steps". For example, a common standard is for 200 steps per full revolution. Microstepping is a method to send signals to the motor to move only a fraction of a full step at a time. For example, if a motor has 200 steps per revolution and is microstepped 1/16, then effectively there are 3200 small step movements (microsteps) per revolution instead of 200 larger ones. This makes the motion of the motor much smoother and more precisely controllable, at the cost of decreased holding torque.

    Here are is a good references for stepper motor theory: http://users.ece.utexas.edu/~valvano/Datasheets/StepperMicrostep.pdf

    And Wikipedia has a good overview as well:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stepper_motor

    Click the link to respond:
    I am looking at 2 of your drivers. 1 is the 1/64 step and the other is 1/256. What is the difference between the two?

  • what is the difference between parallel and USB electronics. I have a laptop that will run the mach3 program.

    The parallel (printer cable) port is uses the computer as its main source of pulse trains to operate the motor driver directly. Parallel ports are a direct connection from the processor commonly referred to as GPIO pins (General Purpose I/O pins) and provides a convenient and powerful way to interface with the computer. The parallel breakout board is included in those kits only to condition those signals for use with the drivers.

    The USB serves at the actual controller, sending the pulse trains, but the computer sends simple human readable instructions to the USB controller to tell the controller how to send pulses.

    The non-technical differences that may serve as the most important information to you is that the parallel configurations allow for a wider variety of industry standard software that can be used to control the cnc machine. The USB that we offer requires the operator to use a software called Planet-CNC software which is a very well made and feature full cnc control software.

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    what is the difference between parallel and USB electronics. I have a laptop that will run the mach3 program.

  • what parts would i need from you to convert my cnc plasma table into a laser cutter? price?

    First, you would need a laser tube, laser power supply, laser controller and a lens holder. You may need mirrors and mirror holders if you plan on orienting the laser tube in a direction other than directly towards the work surface.

    You can find these items and prices here: https://www.buildyourcnc.com/LaserComponents.aspx

    You will need to mount the laser tube and power supply. We recommend mounting the tube and power supply to the gantry, or directly to the axis that moves across the gantry for reduced power loss and to eliminate slight drift from mirror alignment error.

    The controller will need to be connected to your existing motor drivers. If you wish to still use your plasma table for plasma cutting work, you will need to have a switch and transistor circuit to switch which controller has precedence to control the drivers (having both controllers connected to the drivers, but having a TTL circuit using buffer/gates chips that is controlled by a single switch. We can assembly this circuit for you for a fee.

    If this is a machine that we did not manufacture, you will need to create the mounts for the laser tube. We can provide guidance for a fee if needed.

    Additional Information:
    Will my existing controller not work for controlling both? What would I need to make the laser cut when the table moves. The table has a thc and enable disable circuit. Also when will the mirror mounting head assembly be in stock again?

    Additional Information:
    I'm not familiar with the controller that you use for plasma cutting. The principle is probably the same. There is two main axes for movement and a trigger signal to start the plasma cutting. Not sure if your plasma table contains a z-axis that follows closely to the work surface to get the most efficient arcing. That function could be helpful, but not necessary for the laser.

    If your controller has a standard digital level trigger control, then that would be fine.

    Laser controller have the ability to create raster style engraving. If you don't need this functionality, then a laser controller may not be needed.

    Click the link to respond:
    what parts would i need from you to convert my cnc plasma table into a laser cutter? price?

  • Is there any precision or accuracy difference between the vertical and blacktooth lasers?

    I will address the two separately (precision and accuracy):

    Precision (repeatability):
    This is most closely related to the resolution. The blackTooth uses the same mechanical drive (timing belts and pulley) of the same ratios and specifications, so the two machines will be the same in this respect.

    Accuracy:

    The output of the machine (the final physical work) matching the input given to the machine (the design data or instructions for the machine to product the physical work. This has to do with both resolution and how well the machine will hold up over time and through environmental changes.

    With that said, both machines have very similar attributes in mechanics and structure. The overall structure is made of MDO (Medium Density Overlay) and has a very low coefficient of linear expansion with regards to temperature change, so accuracy will not be affected in any appreciable manner over time with the two machines. The Vertical Laser XL does use more industry standard rails to hold the heavy gantry, but this will be differ appreciably since the blackTooth will exhibit rigidity by virtue of its size.

    It really is best to consider the application and size as the main aspects of deciding between these two machines.

    Hope this helps.


    Additional Information:
    We're looking at getting the vertical so we can run both large and small jobs on the same machine. It sounds like running a small job on the vertical (using a positioning jig) would provide results at least as
    good as running the same job on the blacktooth. Does this sound about right?

    Click the link to respond:
    Is there any precision or accuracy difference between the vertical and blacktooth lasers?

  • WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PARALLEL AND USB ELECTRONICS COMBOS MOTOR KITS

    The parallel (printer cable) port is uses the computer as its main source of pulse trains to operate the motor driver directly. Parallel ports are a direct connection from the processor commonly referred to as GPIO pins (General Purpose I/O pins) and provides a convenient and powerful way to interface with the computer. The parallel breakout board is included in those kits only to condition those signals for use with the drivers.

    The USB serves at the actual controller, sending the pulse trains, but the computer sends simple human readable instructions to the USB controller to tell the controller how to send pulses.

    The non-technical differences that may serve as the most important information to you is that the parallel configurations allow for a wider variety of industry standard software that can be used to control the cnc machine. The USB that we offer requires the operator to use a software called Planet-CNC software which is a very well made and feature full cnc control software.

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PARALLEL AND USB ELECTRONICS COMBOS MOTOR KITS

  • WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A PRINTER CABLE PORT AND USB MOTOR KITS

    The parallel (printer cable) port is uses the computer as its main source of pulse trains to operate the motor driver directly. Parallel ports are a direct connection from the processor commonly referred to as GPIO pins (General Purpose I/O pins) and provides a convenient and powerful way to interface with the computer. The parallel breakout board is included in those kits only to condition those signals for use with the drivers.

    The USB serves at the actual controller, sending the pulse trains, but the computer sends simple human readable instructions to the USB controller to tell the controller how to send pulses.

    The non-technical differences that may serve as the most important information to you is that the parallel configurations allow for a wider variety of industry standard software that can be used to control the cnc machine. The USB that we offer requires the operator to use a software called Planet-CNC software which is a very well made and feature full cnc control software.

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A PRINTER CABLE PORT AND USB MOTOR KITS

  • I have an Eagle Plasma table and I want to add a 40 laser. Can you supply me a list of what I need to make this happen.
  • WHAT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN 3 AXIS AND 5 CNC?

    3 axis machines cannot create undercuts in the part.

    These videos show the capabilities of 3 and 5 axis machining:

    3-axis CNC:

    &feature=fvwrel

    5-axis CNC:
    &feature=related

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    WHAT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN 3 AXIS AND 5 CNC?

  • WHAT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN 3 AXIS AND 5 CNC?

    A crystal is a mineral, meaning it has an exact chemical composition and an orderly arrangement of it's atoms. A rock on the other hand, does not have an exact composition and can be made of many different kinds of minerals.

    Click the link to respond:
    WHAT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN 3 AXIS AND 5 CNC?

  • What is the difference between the 3 Blacktooth laser packages offered? Specifically, one with/without a computer? Why do I need one? Also, is the $2100 assembled vs the $1700 which is not? What am I paying $400 more for?

    If you read the description the first uses a parallel interface for computer hookup. The second uses USB interface for computer hookup. The third utilizes an integrated computer which is built into the package thus you do not need an external computer.

    Click the link to respond:
    What is the difference between the 3 Blacktooth laser packages offered? Specifically, one with/without a computer? Why do I need one? Also, is the $2100 assembled vs the $1700 which is not? What am I paying $400 more for?

Get Help with:
This Product
Orders
Tech Support
Sales
This Product
Order Query
Tech Support
Sales
Not logged in. Log In Register
Track Order(s)
View Order(s)
I Want to Schecule a One-On-One Paid Tech Support Session
Book an Appointment Pertaining to a BuildYourCNC Product (Free)
Ask a Quesion Below (Free):
Book an Appointment Pertaining Other Equipment ($60/half hour)
Book an Immedite Appointment Pertaining Other Equipment ($120/half hour)
Ask a Quesion Below (Free):
Waiting for response... I may not answer immediately, but I was notified on my cellular phone so my response is forthcoming. If I don't respond immediately, you can always go to the [My Account] page to see all of our chats at any time.