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Question #: 1151

Question: The website states the shaft of the NEMA 24 stepper motor is 1/4" in diameter. However, the datasheet states the shaft is 8mm in diameter. Which is correct?

Current Solution

The input shaft for the NEMA 24 is 1/4" inch/ 6.5mm, the schematic has a error which states 8mm, which should be 6.5mm.

Respond:

Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • Your combo kits don't specify whether they are standard NEMA motors. I need Nema 34 with a .375 shaft diameter. Which 3 axis kit work for these requirements?

    We currently do not have any Nema motor's with a .375"/3/8" shaft diameter. The motors in stock 100 oz, 425 oz, with a 1/4" input shaft. Our 651 oz, with a 1/2" input shaft.

    Click the link to respond:
    Your combo kits don't specify whether they are standard NEMA motors. I need Nema 34 with a .375 shaft diameter. Which 3 axis kit work for these requirements?

  • Is the shaft diameter of the NEMA 23 motor 1/4 inch?

    The NEMA 23 425-oz in. motor has both input shafts at a 1/4".

    Click the link to respond:
    Is the shaft diameter of the NEMA 23 motor 1/4 inch?

  • Do you offer or can recommend a place where I can buy the Drive Pulley for NEMA 43 Stepper Motor (1586 oz-in 3/4" single shaft) 5.5 Amps?

    We don't offer those drive pullies with a 3/4" bore at the moment. We can supply them if you are willing to wait. If so, what is the pulley pitch, how many teeth and the width of the belt.

    Additional Information:
    Meant to say pulleys, not pullies.

    Click the link to respond:
    Do you offer or can recommend a place where I can buy the Drive Pulley for NEMA 43 Stepper Motor (1586 oz-in 3/4" single shaft) 5.5 Amps?

  • I cannot find a driver for the NEMA 14 Stepping Motor (17 oz-in 1/4" dual shaft) on your site, would something like the Pololu DRV8834 be okay? (I note that the stepper requires 2.7v)
  • Is the NEMA 11 Stepper Motor (16.7 oz-in .185" dual shaft) 0.67 Amps actually a dual shaft stepper motor? The drawings only show the shaft coming out one side.
  • The Datasheet link for the stepper driver seems to need Microsoft Office to open. Is there another way to open that data sheet link?

    Fixed. The 3.0 amp driver datasheet has been converted to a pdf.

    Click the link to respond:
    The Datasheet link for the stepper driver seems to need Microsoft Office to open. Is there another way to open that data sheet link?

  • I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can lift using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can lift using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

  • Do you have it in stock? (NEMA 11 Stepper Motor (16.7 oz-in .185" dual shaft) 0.67 Amps)

    Yes, we have the NEMA 11 16.7 oz-in stepper motor with dual shaft in stock.

    Click the link to respond:
    Do you have it in stock? (NEMA 11 Stepper Motor (16.7 oz-in .185" dual shaft) 0.67 Amps)

  • I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

  • got my stepper motors wired to the information on your website using USB Bob and the motors don't step they keep turning like an old drill until they stop

    So, if I understand correctly, the stepping motor will turn on command, but the motor will only turn in one direction. Check the output of your direction signal wire. Check the wire voltage when you command the motor to turn on one direction in the planet-cnc software. Then check the voltage when you command the motor to turn in the other direction. The voltage should be different in each case.

    Click the link to respond:
    got my stepper motors wired to the information on your website using USB Bob and the motors don't step they keep turning like an old drill until they stop

  • What is the correct wiring scheme for wiring a six wire stepper motor to the Makerbot driver. The motor has solid red, solid green, solid white, solid black, red/white stripe, red green stripe.

    To find the correct wiring for any particular motor, it is best to look at the motor data sheet. If it is a motor that you purchased from us, you can find that motors particular datasheet linked on that motors product page on our website.

    Additional Information:
    20

    Click the link to respond:
    What is the correct wiring scheme for wiring a six wire stepper motor to the Makerbot driver. The motor has solid red, solid green, solid white, solid black, red/white stripe, red green stripe.

  • I have theNema 24, 425 Oz stepper motors kit what are my Ports and Pins?

    The ports and pins are designated by the breakout board that you have, Now here are the schematics for both(https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-parallel-breakout-relay#prettyPhoto/2/ and https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-electronic-component-USB-Controller-Breakout#prettyPhoto/2/) Which for the Parallel the pins will be 1,14,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9. For 1,14 you will need to use them together for a additional axis. Setup will be (ex.mach3) step in (2) / direction pin (3). continued for other pins, 4,5 6,7 etc.
    Now for the USB it has the label on the board right next to the terminal blocks, x-axis/etc.

    Click the link to respond:
    I have theNema 24, 425 Oz stepper motors kit what are my Ports and Pins?

  • I am going to build a CNC 4x4 plasma table. The frame is made of 1 1/4" pipe and the gantry will be made of either 2"x 2" or 2"x 3" tubing. What size stepper motors do you suggest?

    We recommend our electronics combo for the scratch build kit, which you can find on our site here: https://buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-3axis-425-elcombo. This is our standard general purpose 3 axis electronics system, and includes (3) NEMA 24 425 oz-in stepping motors, (3) Drivers (3.0Amp 24-40 Volts, with 1-1/64 microstepping), (1) 36v 8.8a Power Supply, (1) Interface Board either USB or Parallel. (The USB version requires PlanetCNC software; the parallel interface board gives you a variety of options, Mach3 being one popular choice.)

    Click the link to respond:
    I am going to build a CNC 4x4 plasma table. The frame is made of 1 1/4" pipe and the gantry will be made of either 2"x 2" or 2"x 3" tubing. What size stepper motors do you suggest?

  • Is there a warranty on the NEMA 34 651 Oz-in stepper motors you sell?

    Yes, we honor a one year warranty on the NEMA 34 651 oz-in stepper motor.

    Click the link to respond:
    Is there a warranty on the NEMA 34 651 Oz-in stepper motors you sell?

  • Where are the datasheets for the stepper motors?

    You can find the datasheets to our motors be going to the the stepping motor category page https://www.buildyourcnc.com/category/nema and selecting the motor. This will bring you to the product page for the motor and all of the motor information will be found there.

    Click the link to respond:
    Where are the datasheets for the stepper motors?

  • Can this driver accept 5 lead Nema 34 steppers: Stepping Motor Driver (24-70 volts DC, up to 6.0 amps, microstepping from 1/2 to 1/256)

    Please measure the resistance between all the wires in all combinations to determine where these wires exists with the coils. I am not familiar with 5 wire stepper motors.

    Click the link to respond:
    Can this driver accept 5 lead Nema 34 steppers: Stepping Motor Driver (24-70 volts DC, up to 6.0 amps, microstepping from 1/2 to 1/256)

  • I cannot turn the shaft of my stepper motor. It not even connected to a driver

    The motor is creating it's own EMF when you try to turn the shaft manually. When coils are connected (or not connected) to any circuit that is not powered can cause unpredictable results.

    The motor freezing from just turning it by hand with no connection is surely the wires touching each other. This is actually how we test if a motor is good or bad. If the motor freezes when two of the wires are touching, that means the motor is functioning properly since the magnets are causing current to flow through that coil opposing the magnet.

    Click the link to respond:
    I cannot turn the shaft of my stepper motor. It not even connected to a driver

  • I am retrofitting two Emco f1 mills, the motor, at least on the x axis is a 83 oz/in with a 1/4" shaft, would item #291 work or could I use the red fly system?

    The 3 axis electronics combo, will work with your EMCO mill as well as the redFly.
    The difference between both these kits is one comes assembled while the other comes as a DIY kit. The major concern if trying to retrofit, our motors to a specific machine will be the mounting holes. Which can be found in the motors specific datasheet.

    Click the link to respond:
    I am retrofitting two Emco f1 mills, the motor, at least on the x axis is a 83 oz/in with a 1/4" shaft, would item #291 work or could I use the red fly system?

  • Hi please could you tell me how to work out the size required for the stepper motors ? which kit to get thanks

    The size of motors required for your machine build will depend on many characteristics of the machine.

    If the machine uses a gantry (rather than moving the table bed) and the weight of the gantry (specifically with inertia),

    The mechanics used with the axes, lead screw, roller chain, timing belt or rack and pinion. Generally you will need less torque if using lead screw due to the mechanical advantage, but friction is important to consider.

    If you are building a 4'x8' or larger machine, it would be best to use: https://buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-3axis-heavy-gantry-elcombo

    Otherwise: this electronics: https://buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-3axis-425-elcombo should be fine for most configurations.

    If you feel that you need extra torque on the z-axis (the z-axis will use a very heavy spindle, for instance), use this electronics: https://buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-3axis-651-elcombo

    Click the link to respond:
    Hi please could you tell me how to work out the size required for the stepper motors ? which kit to get thanks