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Question #: 1182

Question: While motor tuning what are the recommended steps per inch, velocity, and acceleration for the GreenBull CNC?

Current Solution

In the customer service live, just enter "motor tuning" and it will give you a list of all the recommended or default settings for our machines. However the acceleration and velocity for the greenBull(other machines) will be an actual determination on your trials. You will want the highest possible acceleration and velocity without the motors stalling, so you can do increments of ten to be on the safe side, if it is too slow try increments of 25.

The steps per inch is dependent on the microstepping:
Steps/Inch for the x and y
Steps = 200 motor steps per revolution x 16 microsteps = 3200 steps
Inches = sprocket number of teeth x pitch of the sprocket = 14 x .25" = 3.5 inches
steps/inch = 3200 / 3.5 = 914.28
This is really a starting point. You will then need to use the mach3 calibration function to get the perfect steps/inch value. Use as long a measurement as possible when calibrating.

Velocity:
Start with a value of 1000 ipm. Increase this value with a relatively low acceleration at about 10. You will notice at a particular velocity that it will stall. This is your stall velocity. I would take the stall velocity and reduce it by about 30% to 50% which should give you a good final safe velocity.

Acceleration:
Once the velocity is found, raise the acceleration until it start to stall at a low velocity. Reduce the acceleration by about the same percentage to stick with a safe acceleration.

The acceleration is mostly dependent on torque (current) and the top speed is dependent on the amount of voltage.

Give some tests with all of the axes running at the same time. If you notice and stalling, reduce velocities and acceleration depending on when the stall happens (top end, or acceleration curve).


X-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
Y-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
Dipswitches: 01100110
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
Z-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
Dipswitches: 01100100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

Additional Information:


Additional Information:


Additional Information:
4th axis


Additional Information:

Respond:

Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • Motor tuning. While motor tuning what are the recommended steps per inch, velocity, and acceleration for the BlackFoot CNC?

    These are the recommend values(default) for our blackFoot CNC machine, the acceleration and velocity can be adjusted as high as the motor can rotate without stalling! Suggested increment's will be by 10's.

    blackFoot:
    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 5.43A
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in, Velocity 400.02, Acceleration 4
    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in, Velocity 400.02, Acceleration 4
    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in, Velocity 79.98, Acceleration 5

    Additional Information:
    how can we tuning the CNC motor

    Click the link to respond:
    Motor tuning. While motor tuning what are the recommended steps per inch, velocity, and acceleration for the BlackFoot CNC?

  • Hello, I have a Greenbull almost ready to work and I am trying to calibrate the machine, what are the specifics values as steps per units (SPU), ….. to load in planet cnc software to do the best accuracy as possible. My currents values are standar: Steps/unit 200.000, int speed 0.00, Maximun speed 0.00 and Acceleration 15.000 for each axes. Thank for your help.

    The greenBull uses roller chain for the X and Y axes. The drive sprockets have 14 teeth and the pitch (from crown to crown, or pin to pin measurement) is 1/4" (0.25 inches). You will need the pitch circumference which is: 14 * .25 = 3.5 inches. We need to find the steps per inch (steps/inch). We now have the inches for one full revolution. Now we need to find the number of steps for one full rotation of the motor. For these sprockets, I find that 16 microsteps is best. Make sure that the drivers for the X and Y axes are set to 1/16 microstepping. The motor have 200 steps per rotation, so the total steps with 1/16 microsteps is 200 * 16 = 3200. So the steps/inch is 3200 step / 3.5 inches = 914.286.

    The velocity should be around 400-1000. Test various values for velocity and make sure that no stalling happens. Start with a very low acceleration and determine it's top velocity. When the top velocity is found, reduce the velocity to give you a good factor of safety. Then increase the acceleration until it stall at a low velocity and then reduce the acceleration to give you a good factor of safety for acceleration.

    Do the same thing for the z-axis. The lead screw pitch circumference is 0.5 inches (2 turns per inch or 5starts/10tpi).

    Click the link to respond:
    Hello, I have a Greenbull almost ready to work and I am trying to calibrate the machine, what are the specifics values as steps per units (SPU), ….. to load in planet cnc software to do the best accuracy as possible. My currents values are standar: Steps/unit 200.000, int speed 0.00, Maximun speed 0.00 and Acceleration 15.000 for each axes. Thank for your help.

  • GreenBull 5x10 X axis shutters and spins out with acceleration at 1 in StepCon, is there anything else I can check?

    If your axis shutters and will not move unless moved by another force, that sounds like your acceleration is set too high. Lower the acceleration until it works well, then lower it a bit more to have a margin of safety.

    Users response:
    I've lowered my acceleration to 1 in the StepCon program and it still shutters when I jog it, anything else I could check?

    Buildyourcnc response:
    IF that didn't work, try swapping the X and Y drivers. That way you will pinpoint if the issue is the driver. If the proplem persists, then there may be an issue with the motor itself.

    Buildyourcnc response:
    The X and Y drivers can be easily swapped by swapping only the motor wires.

    - Remove the x-axis motor wires from the X driver.
    - Remove the Y motor wires from the Y driver.
    - Insert the X motor wires into the Y driver.
    - Insert the Y motor wires into the X driver.

    Buildyourcnc response:
    Now the Y-axis will move the gantry. Test the Gantry movement by moving the Y axis using the up and down arrow keys (mach3).

    Users response:
    Problem is now solved, I switched the X and Y at the redFly and got the same problem, so then I undid the wires going to each motor and switched them there and it I had a bad solder point in the X axis connector, thank you for the help

    Buildyourcnc response:
    You're very welcome. We will make sure to thoroughly check the solder points on the cable connectors prior to a redFly delivery.

    Click the link to respond:
    GreenBull 5x10 X axis shutters and spins out with acceleration at 1 in StepCon, is there anything else I can check?

  • Whats the maximum recommended speed to lase (engraving not cutting) a shape (say triangle) using the greenBull hybrid?

    The feedrate at which to engrave using a CO2 laser will depend on the material, depth of engraving and intensity of the laser output. For instance, if engraving plastic, you can run the machine at a very high feedrate (i.e. 100-500 ipm) and a very low intensity. In converse, anodized aluminum will require high intensity and moderate feedrate. Engraving woods will require fast or slow feedrate and high or low laser intensity depending on the result desired.

    With the greenBull, be careful with changes in direction at high feedrates as there is a very high amount of inertia with all of the components on the gantry. It is good to test raster vs. vector for some engraving patterns.

    Additional Information:
    I should have specified my exact question better. Sorry. Where you say "be careful with changes in direction at high feedrates as there is a very high amount of inertia", what is the maximum allowed acceleration (conversely deceleration) you recommend using.

    Click the link to respond:
    Whats the maximum recommended speed to lase (engraving not cutting) a shape (say triangle) using the greenBull hybrid?

  • My question about motor tuning for the blacktoe in Mach 3 was for the aceleration and velocity settings what are the recomended settings

    In the customer service live, just enter "motor tuning" and it will give you a list of all the recommended or default settings for our machines. However the acceleration and velocity for the greenBull(other machines) will be an actual determination on your trials. You will want the highest possible acceleration and velocity without the motors stalling, so you can do increments of ten to be on the safe side, if it is too slow try increments of 25.

    The steps per inch is dependent on the microstepping:
    Steps/Inch for the x and y
    Steps = 200 motor steps per revolution x 16 microsteps = 3200 steps
    Inches = sprocket number of teeth x pitch of the sprocket = 14 x .25" = 3.5 inches
    steps/inch = 3200 / 3.5 = 914.28
    This is really a starting point. You will then need to use the mach3 calibration function to get the perfect steps/inch value. Use as long a measurement as possible when calibrating.

    Velocity:
    Start with a value of 1000 ipm. Increase this value with a relatively low acceleration at about 10. You will notice at a particular velocity that it will stall. This is your stall velocity. I would take the stall velocity and reduce it by about 30% to 50% which should give you a good final safe velocity.

    Acceleration:
    Once the velocity is found, raise the acceleration until it start to stall at a low velocity. Reduce the acceleration by about the same percentage to stick with a safe acceleration.

    The acceleration is mostly dependent on torque (current) and the top speed is dependent on the amount of voltage.

    Give some tests with all of the axes running at the same time. If you notice and stalling, reduce velocities and acceleration depending on when the stall happens (top end, or acceleration curve).


    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    4th axis


    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    My question about motor tuning for the blacktoe in Mach 3 was for the aceleration and velocity settings what are the recomended settings

  • what are the different (feed, travel,rotation) speed to use with planet cnc and a 5x10 greenbull to cut mdf please?

    The feeds and speeds for cutting MDF will depend on the end mill that you are using and at the depth you are cutting.

    The feedrates below are based on 18,00 rpm and using a spindle. Routers will not be able to handle these feedrates.

    Our Onsrud end mills will cut MDF at 3/4" depth per pass at around 300 ipm using the compression end mill. A standard Onsrud single flute will cut MDF at 3/4" depth at 120-140 ipm.

    A general purpose 2 flute end mill at 3/4" depth can cut at around 80 ipm from our experience.

    Click the link to respond:
    what are the different (feed, travel,rotation) speed to use with planet cnc and a 5x10 greenbull to cut mdf please?

  • What is the recommended unit or brand of CPU cooling system for the 2.2 kw spindle on the Fabricator Pro machine

    There really isn't any specific brand. We purchase the components in a disparate fashion from China. I will product a video today that shows all of the components that we use and also offer the components on the website.

    From the upcoming video, you will be able to identify the parts is you feel you want to search for these components yourself.

    Click the link to respond:
    What is the recommended unit or brand of CPU cooling system for the 2.2 kw spindle on the Fabricator Pro machine

  • WHAT ARE CURRENT RECOMMENDED IEEE EMF OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE LEVELS AND GUIDELINES FOR RADIO BASE STATION ANTENNAS?

    The following answer assumes "radio Base Station Antennas" refers to base stations used for personal wireless communications services such as cellular telephone, Personnel Communications Services (PCS), and Enhanced Specialized Mobile radio (ESMR). In the United States, the frequency band allocated for base stations used for personal wireless communications is 869-894 MHz for cellular service, 851-866 MHz for ESMR, and 1930-1990 MHz for PCS. The IEEE exposure limits (maximum permissible exposure—MPE) for occupational exposure (controlled environments where exposures may be incurred by persons who are aware of the potential for exposure) are frequency dependent and are expressed in terms of incident power density. The appropriate value to compare with the MPE is the incident power density averaged over the vertical cross-section of the human body. The occupational exposure limits are also time-averaged over any six-minute interval. The IEEE C95.1-1991 MPE values are shown in the table below:
    IEEE C95.1-1991 Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) Values
    Frequency Band Power Density
    General mw/cm2 W/cm2
    851-866 MHz f/300 mW/cm2 2.84-2.88 28.4-28.8
    869-894 MHz f/300 mW/cm2 2.90-2.98 29.0-29.8
    1930-1990 MHz f/300 mW/cm2 6.43-6.63 64.3-66.3
    NOTE: f is in MHz
    As indicated above, these values are for continuous exposure (t > 6 minutes) and are to be compared with the spatial average of the incident power density. all base stations used for personal wireless telecommunications services in the United States are required to comply with the FCC limits (as mandated by the Telecommunications Act of 1996). The FCC limits are based on a hybrid of the IEEE limits and the 1986 recommendations of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. The FCC MPEs are the same as the IEEE values for frequencies below 1500 MHz but are capped at 5 mW/cm2 (50 W/cm2) for frequencies greater than 1500 MHz.

    Both the FCC and IEEE MPEs for exposure of the public (uncontrolled environments) are one-fifth of the above values. As above, the value to compare with the MPE is the incident power density averaged over the vertical cross-section of the human body. The averaging time for the general public is 30 minutes. Thus, for transient exposures lasting six minutes or less, the MPEs for occupational exposure and exposure of the general public MPEs are the same. For cases of simultaneous exposure from antennas operating in different frequency bands, the ratio of the spatially averaged incident power density in each frequency band to the corresponding MPE for that band is determined and the sum of all such ratios must be less than unity in order to comply.

    R. C. Petersen
    Manager, Wireless and Optical
    Technologies Safety Department

    Click the link to respond:
    WHAT ARE CURRENT RECOMMENDED IEEE EMF OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE LEVELS AND GUIDELINES FOR RADIO BASE STATION ANTENNAS?

  • what are the motor setting for the greenbull

    In the customer service live, just enter "motor tuning" and it will give you a list of all the recommended or default settings for our machines. However the acceleration and velocity for the greenBull(other machines) will be an actual determination on your trials. You will want the highest possible acceleration and velocity without the motors stalling, so you can do increments of ten to be on the safe side, if it is too slow try increments of 25.

    The steps per inch is dependent on the microstepping:
    Steps/Inch for the x and y
    Steps = 200 motor steps per revolution x 16 microsteps = 3200 steps
    Inches = sprocket number of teeth x pitch of the sprocket = 14 x .25" = 3.5 inches
    steps/inch = 3200 / 3.5 = 914.28
    This is really a starting point. You will then need to use the mach3 calibration function to get the perfect steps/inch value. Use as long a measurement as possible when calibrating.

    Velocity:
    Start with a value of 1000 ipm. Increase this value with a relatively low acceleration at about 10. You will notice at a particular velocity that it will stall. This is your stall velocity. I would take the stall velocity and reduce it by about 30% to 50% which should give you a good final safe velocity.

    Acceleration:
    Once the velocity is found, raise the acceleration until it start to stall at a low velocity. Reduce the acceleration by about the same percentage to stick with a safe acceleration.

    The acceleration is mostly dependent on torque (current) and the top speed is dependent on the amount of voltage.

    Give some tests with all of the axes running at the same time. If you notice and stalling, reduce velocities and acceleration depending on when the stall happens (top end, or acceleration curve).


    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    4th axis


    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    what are the motor setting for the greenbull

  • How can I decrease the rapid acceleration of the cutter from a completed cutting operation to a new location so that the stepper motor will not lose its steps and mess up the machine zero settings? I am using CamBam and Mach3 on my machine with a chain drive. what is the best way to reduce accleration

    Decreasing the speed of acceleration in the cutter? Meaning of your router/spindle?, To modify the speed of a router will be going to the router itself and modifying the speed, but if a spindle is being used modifying it will be done either manually in the VFD (VFD Setup:
    Change PD001 to '0' (source of run commands)
    Change PD003 to 300 (main frequency - Hz)
    Change PD004 to 300 (base frequency - Hz)
    Change PD005 to 400 (max operating frequency - Hz)
    Change PD006 to 2.5 (intermediate frequency - Hz)
    Change PD008 to 220 (max voltage - V)
    Change PD009 to 15 (intermediate voltage - V)
    Change PD010 to 8 (minimum voltage - V)
    Change PD011 to 100 (frequency lower limit - Hz)
    Change PD142 to 7 (rated motor current - Amps)
    Change PD143 to 2 (motor pole number)
    Change PD144 to 3000 (rated motor revolution))<- make sure these are your settings in the VFD. If the spindle is wired to the breakout board and is working through Mach 3 then the modification will be done in your CamBam/Feed rate settings.

    Click the link to respond:
    How can I decrease the rapid acceleration of the cutter from a completed cutting operation to a new location so that the stepper motor will not lose its steps and mess up the machine zero settings? I am using CamBam and Mach3 on my machine with a chain drive. what is the best way to reduce accleration

  • IF I PURCHASE A GREENBULL 6X LONG Z CNC MACHINE KIT AND MACH3, WHAT ELSE WOULD BE REQUIRED TO ASSEMBLE THE WORKING MACHINE? HAVE CAD SOFTWARE.

    You will need to build the table unit for your machine. There are instructions on how to do this at the bottom of the product page here, https://www.buildyourcnc.com/Item/cnc-machine-blackFoot-v4
    There is no estimate on how much this will cost though, since there are too many variables involved to do this.

    - PC with parallel port and USB port
    - 20awg stranded wires for the motors - http://www.buildyourcnc.com/electronicscombo.aspx
    - 18awg stranded wires for power supply to drivers
    - 24awg stranded wires for breakout board to drivers
    (location and spacing of components varies from one person to another, so we do not provide cables/wires)
    - General purpose extension cord (cut the female end off) to provide power to power supply
    - USB cable to power breakout board
    - Parallel cable to communicate to breakout board
    - Router
    - (optional - instead of router) Spindle with power inverter http://www.buildyourcnc.com/SpindlesAndAccessories.aspx
    - (if purchasing spindle with inverter) General purpose extension cord (240v) (cut the female end off) to provide power to power inverter
    - End Mill(s) http://www.buildyourcnc.com/ProductsEndMills.aspx
    - CAD, and/or CAD-CAM software (to produce geometry, machine operations, and g-code) http://www.buildyourcnc.com/CNCsoftware.aspx
    - CNC control software (to read g-code and control machine) http://www.buildyourcnc.com/CNCsoftware.aspx

    This answer is applicable to most of our machines with the exception of the greenLean and the blueChick since those machines are equipped with a table structure.

    Click the link to respond:
    IF I PURCHASE A GREENBULL 6X LONG Z CNC MACHINE KIT AND MACH3, WHAT ELSE WOULD BE REQUIRED TO ASSEMBLE THE WORKING MACHINE? HAVE CAD SOFTWARE.

  • If I purchase a greenBull 6X Long Z CNC Machine Kit and Mach3, what else would be required to assemble the working machine? I have CAD software.

    You will need to build the table unit for your machine. There are instructions on how to do this at the bottom of the product page here, https://www.buildyourcnc.com/Item/cnc-machine-blackFoot-v4
    There is no estimate on how much this will cost though, since there are too many variables involved to do this.

    - PC with parallel port and USB port
    - 20awg stranded wires for the motors - http://www.buildyourcnc.com/electronicscombo.aspx
    - 18awg stranded wires for power supply to drivers
    - 24awg stranded wires for breakout board to drivers
    (location and spacing of components varies from one person to another, so we do not provide cables/wires)
    - General purpose extension cord (cut the female end off) to provide power to power supply
    - USB cable to power breakout board
    - Parallel cable to communicate to breakout board
    - Router
    - (optional - instead of router) Spindle with power inverter http://www.buildyourcnc.com/SpindlesAndAccessories.aspx
    - (if purchasing spindle with inverter) General purpose extension cord (240v) (cut the female end off) to provide power to power inverter
    - End Mill(s) http://www.buildyourcnc.com/ProductsEndMills.aspx
    - CAD, and/or CAD-CAM software (to produce geometry, machine operations, and g-code) http://www.buildyourcnc.com/CNCsoftware.aspx
    - CNC control software (to read g-code and control machine) http://www.buildyourcnc.com/CNCsoftware.aspx

    This answer is applicable to most of our machines with the exception of the greenLean and the blueChick since those machines are equipped with a table structure.

    Click the link to respond:
    If I purchase a greenBull 6X Long Z CNC Machine Kit and Mach3, what else would be required to assemble the working machine? I have CAD software.

  • I just changed my X and Y to the ACME 1/2" 5 start lead screw. What are the motor tuning numbers. I have the book built machine.

    The settings that will have to be change will be your steps per inch in motor tuning (mach 3), or settings/axes(planetCNC). But we do not have the actual numbers/specs that will fit your 10 TPI 5 start lead screw, here is a tutorial video which explains how to get the exact numbers you need! (

    )

    Click the link to respond:
    I just changed my X and Y to the ACME 1/2" 5 start lead screw. What are the motor tuning numbers. I have the book built machine.

  • With a 1/2 lead screw what is the optimal steps for the stepper motor driver 1/16, 1/8, 1/4 etc

    We typically use a 1/4 microstepping for lead screws, but you want to determine the microstepping only after you determine what resolution you want on that axis of the machine.

    The formula:
    Resolution is steps per inch or steps per milimeter

    I will go over this using steps/inch:
    steps = motor steps x driver microstepping
    inch = the amount of travel with one full stepper motor rotation

    In the case of our 1/2" 5 start 10 TPI lead screw, the axis will travel .5 inches with one stepper motor rotation.

    Let's use 1/4 microstepping (4 microsteps for each stepper motor step)

    Therefore:
    (200 steps x 4) / .5 inches =
    800 steps / .5 inches =
    1600 steps/inch

    Now let's use 1/2 microstepping (2 mistrosteps)

    (200 steps x 2) / .5 inches =
    400 steps / .5 inches =
    800 steps/inch

    Remember that increasing microsteps, the torque is also reduced, but the smoothness from the motor is increased.

    Click the link to respond:
    With a 1/2 lead screw what is the optimal steps for the stepper motor driver 1/16, 1/8, 1/4 etc

  • HOW CAN I DETERMINE STEPS/INCH, VELOCITY AND ACCELERATION?

    In the customer service live, just enter "motor tuning" and it will give you a list of all the recommended or default settings for our machines. However the acceleration and velocity for the greenBull(other machines) will be an actual determination on your trials. You will want the highest possible acceleration and velocity without the motors stalling, so you can do increments of ten to be on the safe side, if it is too slow try increments of 25.

    The steps per inch is dependent on the microstepping:
    Steps/Inch for the x and y
    Steps = 200 motor steps per revolution x 16 microsteps = 3200 steps
    Inches = sprocket number of teeth x pitch of the sprocket = 14 x .25" = 3.5 inches
    steps/inch = 3200 / 3.5 = 914.28
    This is really a starting point. You will then need to use the mach3 calibration function to get the perfect steps/inch value. Use as long a measurement as possible when calibrating.

    Velocity:
    Start with a value of 1000 ipm. Increase this value with a relatively low acceleration at about 10. You will notice at a particular velocity that it will stall. This is your stall velocity. I would take the stall velocity and reduce it by about 30% to 50% which should give you a good final safe velocity.

    Acceleration:
    Once the velocity is found, raise the acceleration until it start to stall at a low velocity. Reduce the acceleration by about the same percentage to stick with a safe acceleration.

    The acceleration is mostly dependent on torque (current) and the top speed is dependent on the amount of voltage.

    Give some tests with all of the axes running at the same time. If you notice and stalling, reduce velocities and acceleration depending on when the stall happens (top end, or acceleration curve).


    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    4th axis


    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW CAN I DETERMINE STEPS/INCH, VELOCITY AND ACCELERATION?

  • How can I determine steps/inch, velocity and acceleration?

    In the customer service live, just enter "motor tuning" and it will give you a list of all the recommended or default settings for our machines. However the acceleration and velocity for the greenBull(other machines) will be an actual determination on your trials. You will want the highest possible acceleration and velocity without the motors stalling, so you can do increments of ten to be on the safe side, if it is too slow try increments of 25.

    The steps per inch is dependent on the microstepping:
    Steps/Inch for the x and y
    Steps = 200 motor steps per revolution x 16 microsteps = 3200 steps
    Inches = sprocket number of teeth x pitch of the sprocket = 14 x .25" = 3.5 inches
    steps/inch = 3200 / 3.5 = 914.28
    This is really a starting point. You will then need to use the mach3 calibration function to get the perfect steps/inch value. Use as long a measurement as possible when calibrating.

    Velocity:
    Start with a value of 1000 ipm. Increase this value with a relatively low acceleration at about 10. You will notice at a particular velocity that it will stall. This is your stall velocity. I would take the stall velocity and reduce it by about 30% to 50% which should give you a good final safe velocity.

    Acceleration:
    Once the velocity is found, raise the acceleration until it start to stall at a low velocity. Reduce the acceleration by about the same percentage to stick with a safe acceleration.

    The acceleration is mostly dependent on torque (current) and the top speed is dependent on the amount of voltage.

    Give some tests with all of the axes running at the same time. If you notice and stalling, reduce velocities and acceleration depending on when the stall happens (top end, or acceleration curve).


    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    4th axis


    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    How can I determine steps/inch, velocity and acceleration?

  • what is the recommended firmware for the awc708c laser controller? I see this download on the Sinjoe site: AWC708 Lite Update Firmware 160901L1

    We have not had any issues with stock firmware on the AWC708lite. Upgrading the firmware will be at your own risk. We can contact our supplier and see if they can provide a suggestion for updating firmware. Contact customerservice@buildyourcnc.com to inquire with a person who can help.

    Additional Information:
    Working area setting

    Additional Information:
    Working area setting

    Click the link to respond:
    what is the recommended firmware for the awc708c laser controller? I see this download on the Sinjoe site: AWC708 Lite Update Firmware 160901L1

  • I purchased the large gantry system with USB control. I have built the CNC and it is working fine. Now fine tuning the motors. On the X-axis I have the Velocity set at 60 (inches), Acceleration at 1.4, the Step Pulse 1-5us and Dir Pulse set at 0. Do I need to adjust the pulses?

    The steps per unit is automatically determined in the calibration of the axis by clicking on the "set steps per unit" button above the reset button on the settings tab. Initially set the velocity and acceleration to a low setting, like 100 and 10 respectively, so that the axis does not stall during this operation. Once calibrated, the steps per unit will be set to the correct value and the velocity and acceleration can be increased. I have a video explaning the tuning of the motors on this page:
    https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-electronic-component-breakout-Mach4-mach3-USB-ethernet-Board

    The name of the video is Test and Tune the motors.

    Click the link to respond:
    I purchased the large gantry system with USB control. I have built the CNC and it is working fine. Now fine tuning the motors. On the X-axis I have the Velocity set at 60 (inches), Acceleration at 1.4, the Step Pulse 1-5us and Dir Pulse set at 0. Do I need to adjust the pulses?

  • stepper motor runs smooth then rough for a moment then smooth, etc. Does this at all steps, and connected motors.

    This sounds like it could be a loose wire, or poor connection with the motor wires. Make sure all wires that are to be connected to each other are soldered and use a lineman's splice when putting the wires together. Also, make sure that the wires going into the driver is securely fastened.

    If this is an issue where the motors have run well for a long time then just started to show this performance issue, then make sure that there are no wire ties or other binding method that is chaffing the wires. This would make the motors run oddly at certain travel positions where the chafing has caused a short with the wires.

    If this is an issue where you don't have the motor plugged in at all and are just trying to turn it by hand and this phenomenon is occuring, then make sure all of the wires are not touching each other. When wires are touching each other and you are trying to spin the shaft by hand, the motor will feed current back into the motor making it difficult to turn.

    Click the link to respond:
    stepper motor runs smooth then rough for a moment then smooth, etc. Does this at all steps, and connected motors.