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Question #: 14196

Question: I bought your 3 axis combo and need to know what name brand is the motors and their ounces and the drivers

Current Solution

Surely you know the brand motors you sold me?

Respond:

Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • Your combo kits don't specify whether they are standard NEMA motors. I need Nema 34 with a .375 shaft diameter. Which 3 axis kit work for these requirements?

    We currently do not have any Nema motor's with a .375"/3/8" shaft diameter. The motors in stock 100 oz, 425 oz, with a 1/4" input shaft. Our 651 oz, with a 1/2" input shaft.

    Click the link to respond:
    Your combo kits don't specify whether they are standard NEMA motors. I need Nema 34 with a .375 shaft diameter. Which 3 axis kit work for these requirements?

  • Is there a complete wiring diagram for the Medium Combo Kit with the usb board? Your USB tutorial does not cover the modular 2.5a drivers. https://buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-3axis-100-elcombo

    We are currently getting it completed for us to post it under the 2.5A stepper driver page. However here is the correct wiring procedure.

    First: Wire the 24V power supply to the 2.5A driver, by wiring +V on the power supply to 12-24V on the driver. Next wire the COM on the power supply to Ground(GND) on the 2.5A driver. GND on the driver will also go to the GND on the USB board, for specific axis. (additional 3-4 wires connected to ground will be needed for the other axes as well).

    Second: Wire the USB board to the driver(one driver per axis on the USB board):
    CP on the driver will go to CP on the desired axis on the USB board.
    CW on the driver will go to CW on the desired axis on the USB board.
    5V will go to the VCC pin on the keyboard jog pins on the USB board (check schematic here: https://buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-electronic-component-USB-Controller-Breakout#prettyPhoto/2/).
    GND on the USB board to GND on the driver. (as specified in step 1).
    EN is not used.

    Personal Note:
    I would recommend that you crimp the VCC pin to a wire which could be split for the other axes as well, each driver will need 5V.

    Third: Wire the stepper motor to the driver, (using either the Nema 23 100-oz or the Nema 17 62-oz stepper motors, the wiring will be the same. For the Nema 23 the yellow and white is not connected.)
    Black to A1
    Green to A2
    Red to B1
    Blue to B2

    Fourth: Repeat steps 1-3 for each driver/motor per axis.

    Mention: Remember that GND on the driver will also go to the GND on the USB board for specific axis, and VCC pin on the USB board (keyboard jog) will go to 5V on all drivers for each axes as well, each driver will need 5V!

    Click the link to respond:
    Is there a complete wiring diagram for the Medium Combo Kit with the usb board? Your USB tutorial does not cover the modular 2.5a drivers. https://buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-3axis-100-elcombo

  • I'm building my own machine using your motors and drivers. What is the best dip switch settings for the 3.0 amp drivers powering the 425 oz motors

    The settings that you will use for your 3.0 amp driver to properly power and turn your 425 oz-in stepper motor will cheifly depend on your application and the mechanical parts you are using on your machine. In all circumstances, the amp setting for the stepper motor (according to the datasheet) should be 2.8 amps. Use the closest setting on the driver without going over.

    Here is a good rule of thumb for the microstepping which will correspond to the resolution, but wil also affect torque. You always want to try to achieve the best torque and resolution for the axis you are moving but go with the lowest microstepping possible. In cases where there is mechanical advantage, like a lead screw scenario, where for each motor revolution, the axis move a very small amount, you will want a very low microstep value. This is because the mechanical configuration will provide most of the finer resolution and you will not need the microstepping to assist in this. Increase the microstepping only in conditions where the axis is not moving smooth enough, or where there is a mechanical disadvantage. A mechanical disadvantage would be where the stepper motor is causing a great amount of movement in the axis and the resolutions suffers from this condition. Increase the microstep value up to your desired resolution, but don't go over since the torque of the motor will decrease.

    Click the link to respond:
    I'm building my own machine using your motors and drivers. What is the best dip switch settings for the 3.0 amp drivers powering the 425 oz motors

  • I bought a, 3-Axis NEMA23 CNC Kit (36V/9.7A/382oz-in/KL-4030.but dont know how to set the dip switches on my drivers. The place I bout the kit from isent very good and support.

    That driver (not purchased here) is a standard 3.0 amp driver that will have the dip switch settings on the top of the driver. You will need to determine the amp rating of you motor for the scheme that you wire your motor to the driver (bipolar parallel is recommended in most circumstances but can depend on your power supply output). Check the stepping motor datasheet for your motor to determine this amp rating.

    The other set of switches will be configure the microstepping. This will depend on your mechanical setup (i.e. lead screw, rack and pinion, roller chain, timing belt, etc.) and the specifications of such mechanical parts.

    This general formula (which can be searched using the Customer Service Live with many examples): step/inch = (natural motor steps * desired microsteps) / (mechanical travel for one motor rotation)

    Click the link to respond:
    I bought a, 3-Axis NEMA23 CNC Kit (36V/9.7A/382oz-in/KL-4030.but dont know how to set the dip switches on my drivers. The place I bout the kit from isent very good and support.

  • I'm trying to build my CNC router 3m*1.3m, but i'm not sure what is the type of stepper motor i should pay, all my CNC body is Al. I need to bay 4 Stepper motors, 4 drivers, spindle, inverter, and i don't know what is the type of controller ?

    The size of the stepper motor is measured in holding torque, generally oz/in. You will determine the torque loads of your axes when selecting steppers. Once you know which stepper you need, the drivers and controller board are simple to pair with them.

    Click the link to respond:
    I'm trying to build my CNC router 3m*1.3m, but i'm not sure what is the type of stepper motor i should pay, all my CNC body is Al. I need to bay 4 Stepper motors, 4 drivers, spindle, inverter, and i don't know what is the type of controller ?

  • The instructions for the 3-axis combo at https://buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-3axis-425-elcombo seem to be missing. Can you look into that.

    To wire the CNC electronics, use the tutorial for the specific interface board you are using.

    If you have the parallel breakout board, use this tutorial:
    https://buildyourcnc.com/CNCElectronicsandWiring.aspx

    If you have the USB interface board, use this tutorial:
    https://buildyourcnc.com/tutorials/tutorial-Electronics-USB-Interface-Wiring

    Click the link to respond:
    The instructions for the 3-axis combo at https://buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-3axis-425-elcombo seem to be missing. Can you look into that.

  • if i purchase the 4 Axis Electronic Combos and the Combo #1 with hardware, plans and DVD what else do i need to have a complete cnc machine

    Other items you will need if you are purchasing the electronic combo (motors, drivers, power supply and computer interface) and the hardware and plans kit:

    You will need the wood to create the structure of the machine. You will need a router to serve as the cutting instrument. You will need a computer to control the machine and the software that will serve as the control program. You will also need lead screws and rails (aluminum angles). If you intend to have faster travel than 20 ipm, we recommend purchasing the 5 start lead screws so you can achieve up to 300 ipm. https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/mechanical-leadscrews-leadnuts-!5-5-starts-10-tpi

    Click the link to respond:
    if i purchase the 4 Axis Electronic Combos and the Combo #1 with hardware, plans and DVD what else do i need to have a complete cnc machine

  • Does your electronics combo allow 2 drivers on a single axis on the interface board?

    Yes, you can have two drivers connected to a single axis. If you want the two drivers/motors to work as a single, more concerted pair, then I would suggest connecting the two drivers to a single step pulse and direction signal.

    That is to say:
    driver 1 and driver 2 have wires connecting from the CP terminals of the drivers to a single step terminal on the interface board (USB or parallel breakout board), and the CW terminals of the drivers connected to a single direction terminal on the interface board.

    If the motors need to spin in the opposite directions, simply reverse one of the the motor A B coil connections (i.e. wires that would go to A+ and A- is connected to the B+ and B-, and the same with the B+ and B- to the A+ and A-). You can alternatively resolve this mechanically if desired.

    Click the link to respond:
    Does your electronics combo allow 2 drivers on a single axis on the interface board?

  • I bought Nema 24 motors and driver package with usb board. What do i need to have more speed? Cant even jog past 25 ipm without the motor stalling (not having enough torgue)

    We recommend checking the dip switch settings on your drivers, having the correct microstepping/amp settings along with the steps/unit will help the motors run as effective as possible.
    This is a default parameter that we use while we test our motors:
    Driver dip switch settings will be at a 1/16 microstepping and 2.7amp (11001100) for x/y-axis and the z-axis will be at 1/4 microstepping and 2.7amp (10101100).

    In planet-cnc with increasing the motor speed, you will have to modify the settings in planet-cnc (File/settings/setup) you will modify the initial speed, maximum speed, and the acceleration.
    X/Y-axis step/unit: 1422.22 initial speed:500 maximum speed:750 acceleration:25
    Z-axis step/unit: 1600 initial speed:100 maximum speed:300 acceleration:25
    The initial speed and maximum speed will have to be roughly tested and adjusted per application.
    Make sure to adjust the JOG slide bard underneath the axis controls on screen to about 750, to compensate for your x/y-axis adjustments. If left alone the speed will max out at the default setting.

    Here is a video tutorial to calculate the steps required depending on your mechanical linear motion components. (

    )

    Click the link to respond:
    I bought Nema 24 motors and driver package with usb board. What do i need to have more speed? Cant even jog past 25 ipm without the motor stalling (not having enough torgue)

  • I am looking at 2 of your motor drivers. 1 is the 1/64 step and the other is 1/256. What is the difference between the two?

    Stepper motors are designed to move in specific increments; these increments are called "steps". For example, a common standard is for 200 steps per full revolution. Microstepping is a method to send signals to the motor to move only a fraction of a full step at a time. For example, if a motor has 200 steps per revolution and is microstepped 1/16, then effectively there are 3200 small step movements (microsteps) per revolution instead of 200 larger ones. This makes the motion of the motor much smoother and more precisely controllable, at the cost of decreased holding torque.

    Here are is a good references for stepper motor theory: http://users.ece.utexas.edu/~valvano/Datasheets/StepperMicrostep.pdf

    And Wikipedia has a good overview as well:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stepper_motor

    Click the link to respond:
    I am looking at 2 of your motor drivers. 1 is the 1/64 step and the other is 1/256. What is the difference between the two?

  • I purchased your single relay and need to know what wire go s to the signal in

    Hi. The relay that we sell here:
    https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-breakout-Relays-relay-board-250V-12A-5V

    Has the same relay as the parallel breakout board:
    https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-parallel-breakout-relay

    And contains three terminals: "S", "P" and "P". The "P" is always connected and will be the connection between the "S" or the "O" depending on if you need the connection to be Normally Closed (NC) or Normally Open (NO).

    - Use the "O" if you need the connection from "P" and "O" to be Normally Open, meaning that the circuit will close (be connected) if the relay engages.

    - Use the "S" if you need the connection from "P" and "S" to be Normally Closed, meaning that the circuit will open (be disconnected) if the relay engages.

    Click the link to respond:
    I purchased your single relay and need to know what wire go s to the signal in

  • I purchased your single relay and need to know what wire go s to the signal in

    Hi. The relay that we sell here:
    https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-breakout-Relays-relay-board-250V-12A-5V

    Has the same relay as the parallel breakout board:
    https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-parallel-breakout-relay

    And contains three terminals: "S", "P" and "P". The "P" is always connected and will be the connection between the "S" or the "O" depending on if you need the connection to be Normally Closed (NC) or Normally Open (NO).

    - Use the "O" if you need the connection from "P" and "O" to be Normally Open, meaning that the circuit will close (be connected) if the relay engages.

    - Use the "S" if you need the connection from "P" and "S" to be Normally Closed, meaning that the circuit will open (be disconnected) if the relay engages.

    Click the link to respond:
    I purchased your single relay and need to know what wire go s to the signal in

  • Does the power supply in the "3 Axis Electronics Combo (Small Motors)" have a 220V input option?

    In our 3-Axis electronics kit, the power supply's provided are capable of both 110V-220V. You have the capability to switch between both in case you might decide to run 220v in the near future or will relocate where 110v is being used.

    Additional Information:
    Connect spindle to the board

    Click the link to respond:
    Does the power supply in the "3 Axis Electronics Combo (Small Motors)" have a 220V input option?

  • What else to I need to purchase along with the "3 Axis Electronics Combo w/ USB Interface Board" to get the electronics up and running? (software, 5V power supply, 4-conductor wire, etc.)

    Here is a list of the parts needed to get the electronics combo functioning (parallel or USB interface options):

    - 22 or 24 gauge stranded hookup wire to connect all of the drivers to the USB or parallel interface (terminal to terminal connections),
    - 18 gauge stranded hookup wire to connect the drivers to the power supply,
    - a power cable (extension cord) to connect from the power outlet to the power supply,
    - 4 conductor cable to connect the drivers to the stepper motors,
    - a USB cable to connect from the computer to the USB interface (or for power to the parallel interface),
    - for the parallel interface, a parallel cable is needed (male to male db-25),
    - a computer (for parallel interface, the computer will need a parallel port and if the computer does not contain a parallel interface, the motherboard may have a header for it, or you can purchase a parallel adapter to plug into the motherboard, very inexpensive),
    - cnc control software: for the USB interface, you will need planet-cnc software, for the parallel interface, you can use any industry standard cnc control software (the typical is Mach3 for Windows, or EMC2 or Linuxcnc for Linux (Linuxcnc.org).

    5v power supply is not needed. The 5 volts signal level power is derived from the computer through USB on both types of interfaces.

    Click the link to respond:
    What else to I need to purchase along with the "3 Axis Electronics Combo w/ USB Interface Board" to get the electronics up and running? (software, 5V power supply, 4-conductor wire, etc.)

  • Can you offer me a combo with motors NEMA17, NEMA23 and NEMA34 and a control box ready for plug and play operation? (this including motor drivers and cables)

    We have a redLeaf and redSprout system available which has all of the CNC electronics and computer system assembled as a plug and play system.

    Click the link to respond:
    Can you offer me a combo with motors NEMA17, NEMA23 and NEMA34 and a control box ready for plug and play operation? (this including motor drivers and cables)

  • I need to determine steps/inch mach3 setup information for my motors and drivers.

    blueChick:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackToe:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackFoot:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    greenBull:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in


    Scratch-Build / Book-Build Kit:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    Scratch built/book CNC with NEMA 34 motors and CW8060 microstep driver

    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    I need to determine steps/inch mach3 setup information for my motors and drivers.

  • I am building a cnc mill using your USB controller and i would like to know what is the specification of potentiometer used for adjusting manual axis jog speed

    Dealing with our USB BoB, the potentiometer that will be used in the key jog, is a 5V, 5k - 10k Ohm potentiometer.

    Click the link to respond:
    I am building a cnc mill using your USB controller and i would like to know what is the specification of potentiometer used for adjusting manual axis jog speed

  • I purchased Mach3 from buildyourcnc dont know what verson i need to use in VCarve as the processor. There are 8 2/3Mach listed

    You will probably have post processors like the following listed:
    Mach2/3 ATC Arcs (inch)
    Mach2/3 ATC Arcs (mm)
    Mach2/3 Arcs (inch)
    Mach2/3 Arcs (mm)
    Mach2/3-WrapX2A ATC Arcs (inch)
    Mach2/3-WrapX2A ATC Arcs (mm)
    Mach2/3-WrapY2A ATC Arcs (inch)
    Mach2/3-WrapY2A ATC Arcs (mm)

    If you have an Automatic Tool Changer, use the post processor with the ATC in the name. For most applications and if you don't have an ATC (automatic tool changer), use the Mach2/3 Arcs (inch) or (mm) post processor.

    Click the link to respond:
    I purchased Mach3 from buildyourcnc dont know what verson i need to use in VCarve as the processor. There are 8 2/3Mach listed

  • What causes one of my two x-axis motors to stop while the Mach 3 program is still running?

    If one of your stepper motors decides to stop moving and the others are moving during a CNC milling or laser cutting job, then there could be two things that could be causing this.

    - The motor found its limiting torque (usually comes with a not-so-pleasant sound). This is where the control software is trying to move the stepper motor too fast (velocity, or too fast too quickly, acceleration) and the load against the stepper motor (inertia of the machine, or the material against the end mill while milling). Recommended action is to lower the velocity and/or acceleration, and/or lower the feedrate when cutting.

    - There is a wiring issue with the wiring from the driver to the motor. This could be a loose wire, or a chafed wire (or two shorting together). It can also be a loose digital wire from the controller board to the driver. Sometimes wire ties can be the culprit. Recommended action would be to thoroughly inspect the wiring.

    It's probably not the limit switches since that would cause a stop to the entire motion of the cnc router or laser machine.

    Sometimes Mach3 will show a status when something goes wrong, but in cases where the motor is stopping due to its torque limit, then that would not be shown in the status. It's always good to check it anyway.

    Additional Information:
    I need to clarify my situation a little better after going to my shop and trying to run another program on Mach 3. About 15 minutes into the milling process all the motors (2-X axis, Y axis and Z axis)stop but the program continues to run. I stop the program and after a couple of minutes when I try to restart the program all the motors start working again. Then after another 15 minutes or so, all the motors stop again. I checked and rechecked my wiring. This has never happened to me before when running the same programs with the same setups and motor speeds. All of a sudden when I reloaded a program I successfully used before it does this. Do you have any recommendations?

    Additional Information:
    Yeah, it sounds like a more complex issue. Have you tried running in the air without using the spindle. This may be a power related issue.

    Additional Information:
    That's exactly what I did. I ran the program without the router motor on just to see if the motors would get through the whole program but they stopped working after about fifteen minutes and then I was able to start them again after about 3 or 4 minutes. I never had this problem before so you can imagine my frustration especially after ruining a couple of projects on expensive material.

    Additional Information:
    Sure. I can completely understand. Try this: disconnect all but one of the driver from power and digital connection and do the air run. Repeat this for each driver and note your findings. This will rule out the drivers causing a power failure.

    Also, is your stepper motors and drivers on a separate power circuit from the computer?

    Additional Information:
    I will try disconnecting each driver and digital connection, which will be a real pain because it will be hard to access.

    All the stepper motors, drivers and computer are plugged into the same power strip.

    Additional Information:
    Ok, so there is no power failure going on, but I believe it is necessary to test each stepper motor and driver pair individually. Hopefully that will lead to a conclusion.

    Additional Information:
    It will take a little time but I will do it and report back on my findings.

    Additional Information:
    Curious, what machine is exhibiting this problem?

    Additional Information:
    I purchased a BYCNC kit back in 2009 with an approximate cutting area of 2' X 4'. I later changed out the Z-Axis Motor and controller for a larger one and have two X-axis motors and controllers. In 2010 I rebuilt the machine out of birch plywood instead of the particle board that the kit supplied. I sent Patrick pictures to him. The machine never gave me a problem till now.

    Additional Information:
    Thanks for the update. This is Patrick by the way. I answer pretty much all of the Customer Service questions. That machine has given quite a good history.

    Additional Information:
    I love the machine and made a number of samples of my work for my e-commerce site, but I can't start selling product until I know this problem is solved because I will not be able to fulfill orders. I finally got all the electronics out of its enclosed protected area near the machine so that I test each controller as you recommended. I hope the problem can be rectified. Will let you know.

    Additional Information:
    Thanks.

    Additional Information:
    I tested each stepper motor and driver pair individually and they worked so what might be the next step?

    Additional Information:
    Did each stepper motor driver pair work for the full +15 minutes?

    Additional Information:
    Yes, I had them in operation for over 30 minutes.

    Additional Information:
    Ok, well it’s good that the motors and driver are ok. We are now down to the power supply and the breakout board as possible causes for the stop. I have a feeling it may be the power supply where with all three drivers drawing current and the power supply maybe getting too hot. Is the fan in the power supply working? You can also test to see if there is 36 volts on the power supply voltage output (V+ and V-).

    Regarding the breakout board, if you have an oscilloscope, you can test if the driver pulses are outputting, but I would consider this as a last resort after you determine if there is a problem with the power supply.

    Additional Information:
    I tested the power supply with a voltmeter and each output was registering 39-40 volts. I think the problem may be the g-code. I am using V-Carve pro to do design and output to Mach 3 Mill g-code. When I studied the g-code lines I noticed that further into the program the z-axis g-code stopped zeroing out to move to the next part of the carving. In other words both the x and y keep moving and the z just stopped working because there was g-code missing. I think something is missing when the design was converted to g-code. I noticed that when I ran a simpler project it worked without problems so I need to investigate this further.

    Additional Information:
    New Update, Its not the g-code. I started to run the long program and everything was working fine until about 45 minutes into it, all the motors stopped working (but the program was still running) and there was a high pitched hum. When I put my hands on the motors they were all trying to move but it seemed they were all stalled. I turned the power off, gave it a minute and when I turned it back on I was able to move the motors again. Could this be a power supply problem?

    Additional Information:
    It does sound more and more like a power supply problem. Did you test the power supply after the motors stopped?

    Additional Information:
    No, I did not. What should I be looking for.

    Additional Information:
    It’s good that you know the voltage during normal operation, so you have a base understood. If the power supply is the problem, the voltage will be reduced or non existent when measured after the problem.

    Additional Information:
    Also, check to see if the fan is running on the power supply when the motors stop. That may (not absolutely) be an indication.

    Additional Information:
    I'll run another test, check the voltage and fan when the problem occurs and let you know. Thanks for hanging in there with me as we try to resolve the problem.

    Additional Information:
    It’s my pleasure. This service is rarely used and is faster then email. Odd nobody uses it. Any recommendations you can give would be great. No problem using this FAQ to pose ideas as this resolution will be cleaned up later.

    Additional Information:
    It might be that people do not realize you can communicate through the sight like this because they are so used to e-mail and texting. You may want to explain this feature in the customer service section.

    I ran the program this morning and it did not take long before the motors stopped. While operating the voltages for all three motors was 46 volts, when the motors stalled (and again there was a high pitch hum) the voltage went up to 60 volts and the fan on the power supply was operating.

    Additional Information:
    So, the driver work individually, but not all together. There is a high pitch sound when the motors fail. You have noted 60 volts from the power supply and the supply fan remains on. This is a difficult issue to resolve, but it seems to me that your power supply may be bad. The 60v measurement tells me that the current dropped and ohms law tells us that is current drops, volts will rise if the resistance stays the same.

    Additional Information:
    As one last test I am going to test each driver again and let them go through the entire program because it seems that the failure can occur at the beginning or towards the end of the program. When I originally tested ach driver I let them run for about a half an hour and the program takes over an hour to run completely. I just want to make sure that it is not the drivers. I will report back when I finished but as you noted it may be the power supply but I want to make sure.

    Additional Information:
    That’s a great idea.

    Additional Information:
    I just ran the x-axis through the whole program and there was no problem especially since I have two NEMA 23 motors moving that axis. Before I check the Y and Z could having a NEMA 34 on the Z axis with appropriate controller be a problem. I used the larger motor on the z axis because the router I am using is a large 1 1/2 hp. I've run this program in the past with this set-up and have not had a problem.

    Additional Information:
    Having a, say 3.0 amp driver, driving a stepper motor that typically requires a 6 amp driver would not seem to be an issue since the driver is limiting the current draw, but the driver may not be able to handle larger coil and back EMF with the protection on the 3.0 amp driver. With that said, I don’t believe that is the issue in this case.

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    I don't either because I was able to run this and other complicated programs with this set-up in the past. I will let you know on the y and z axis.

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    Thanks

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    I ran the Y axis and z axis separately through the entire program and there was no stopping or problem. I guess the culprit is the power supply and I'll order a new one and hope that resolves the problem.

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    Yes, that is the most probable cause. Please keep me informed. Thanks!

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    Received and installed the new power supply. I ran the program with the router on and it worked flawlessly. The program runs for an hour and a half and I did not have a single problem. I guess it was the power supply but I was glad to go through all the diagnostics we discussed before replacing it. I hope this power supply lasts a lot longer than the last one. Thanks much for hanging in there with me and coming up with the solution.

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    It’s my absolute pleasure and I am so happy to hear that the power supply replacement solved the problem.

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    What causes one of my two x-axis motors to stop while the Mach 3 program is still running?