[ Log In ]
[ Register ]
NEW: CNC Router PLANS Available for all of our Newest CNC Models!! Click here to "Design Your CNC".

Question #: 8006

Question: I am looking at 2 of your motor drivers. 1 is the 1/64 step and the other is 1/256. What is the difference between the two?

Current Solution

Stepper motors are designed to move in specific increments; these increments are called "steps". For example, a common standard is for 200 steps per full revolution. Microstepping is a method to send signals to the motor to move only a fraction of a full step at a time. For example, if a motor has 200 steps per revolution and is microstepped 1/16, then effectively there are 3200 small step movements (microsteps) per revolution instead of 200 larger ones. This makes the motion of the motor much smoother and more precisely controllable, at the cost of decreased holding torque.

Here are is a good references for stepper motor theory: http://users.ece.utexas.edu/~valvano/Datasheets/StepperMicrostep.pdf

And Wikipedia has a good overview as well:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stepper_motor

Respond:

Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • I am looking at 2 of your drivers. 1 is the 1/64 step and the other is 1/256. What is the difference between the two?

    Stepper motors are designed to move in specific increments; these increments are called "steps". For example, a common standard is for 200 steps per full revolution. Microstepping is a method to send signals to the motor to move only a fraction of a full step at a time. For example, if a motor has 200 steps per revolution and is microstepped 1/16, then effectively there are 3200 small step movements (microsteps) per revolution instead of 200 larger ones. This makes the motion of the motor much smoother and more precisely controllable, at the cost of decreased holding torque.

    Here are is a good references for stepper motor theory: http://users.ece.utexas.edu/~valvano/Datasheets/StepperMicrostep.pdf

    And Wikipedia has a good overview as well:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stepper_motor

    Click the link to respond:
    I am looking at 2 of your drivers. 1 is the 1/64 step and the other is 1/256. What is the difference between the two?

  • What's the difference between 128 microstepping and 1-1/64 microstepping?

    I'm not sure what particular devices you're talking about so I can't help you as far as compatibility goes, but a microstep fraction refers to the resolution of the rotating motor. let's say your motor takes 200 whole steps to make one complete revolution of the spindle. If you then set your motor to run at 1/64 microsteps it would mean your motor is taking 64 times more steps to cover the same distance, making a total of 12,800 steps to make one complete revolution of the spindle. So a smaller fraction of steps like 1/128, would take even more steps to complete one revolution, 25,600 in fact.

    If you're talking about motor drivers it's probably telling you how many options of resolution you have.
    one giving the highest resolution of 1/128 microsteps but probably still capable of doing 1/64, 1/32, 1/16, 1/8, 1/4, 1/2 and 1 whole step.
    the other one that says 1-1/64 is telling you it ranges between 1 whole step and 1/64th microsteps, so you could do the fractions between like 1/32, 1/16, 1/8, 1/4 and 1/2 as well.

    The amount of microsteps you want to make in one revolution is totally up to you, more steps potentially means a more precise machine, but at a certain point the extra steps may be unnecessary.

    hope this helps

    Click the link to respond:
    What's the difference between 128 microstepping and 1-1/64 microstepping?

  • What's the difference between 128 microstepping and 1-1/64 microstepping?

    Stepper motors are designed to move in specific increments; these increments are called "steps". For example, a common standard is for 200 steps per full revolution. Microstepping is a method to send signals to the motor to move only a fraction of a full step at a time. For example, if a motor has 200 steps per revolution and is microstepped 1/16, then effectively there are 3200 small step movements (microsteps) per revolution instead of 200 larger ones. This makes the motion of the motor much smoother and more precisely controllable, at the cost of decreased holding torque.

    Here are is a good references for stepper motor theory: http://users.ece.utexas.edu/~valvano/Datasheets/StepperMicrostep.pdf

    And Wikipedia has a good overview as well:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stepper_motor

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    Therefore, the difference in 128th and 64th microstepping is increased resolution and smoothness for 128th microstepping, at the cost of decreased holding torque.

    Click the link to respond:
    What's the difference between 128 microstepping and 1-1/64 microstepping?

  • What is the difference between a NEMA 23 and NEMA 24 motor? can I use either one on a machine?

    The frame size difference of the NEMA 23 and 24 is very slight and, depending on the motor mount both will most likely fit. The bigger difference between these stepping motors is the torque. Make sure that the motor that you purchase has the appropriate torque for the axis that it will move.

    Is is safe to go with the higher torque? Or if the torque is too high for what i need is that bad?

    You can use a motor with higher torque. Just make sure to select the correct driver for that motor.

    Additional Information:
    The frame size has nothing to do with torque. Nema 23 means a 2.3" frame. Nema 24 means a 2.4" frame. That's all. Either could have more or less torque depending on speed and power.

    Click the link to respond:
    What is the difference between a NEMA 23 and NEMA 24 motor? can I use either one on a machine?

  • What is the difference between a NEMA 23 and NEMA 24 motor? can I use either one on a machine?

    The frame size difference of the NEMA 23 and 24 is very slight and, depending on the motor mount both will most likely fit. The bigger difference between these stepping motors is the torque. Make sure that the motor that you purchase has the appropriate torque for the axis that it will move.

    Is is safe to go with the higher torque? Or if the torque is too high for what i need is that bad?

    You can use a motor with higher torque. Just make sure to select the correct driver for that motor.

    Additional Information:
    The frame size has nothing to do with torque. Nema 23 means a 2.3" frame. Nema 24 means a 2.4" frame. That's all. Either could have more or less torque depending on speed and power.

    Click the link to respond:
    What is the difference between a NEMA 23 and NEMA 24 motor? can I use either one on a machine?

  • hi am over in the uk and was looking to buy one of your stepper motor bundels but our power is 240v instead of 110v do u sell other power supply units to suit our voltage thanks.

    The power supply units that come with our Electronics Combo Kits have a switchable input voltage. There is a red switch on the side that allows you to switch from 220v to 110v.

    Click the link to respond:
    hi am over in the uk and was looking to buy one of your stepper motor bundels but our power is 240v instead of 110v do u sell other power supply units to suit our voltage thanks.

  • WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PARALLEL AND USB ELECTRONICS COMBOS MOTOR KITS

    The parallel (printer cable) port is uses the computer as its main source of pulse trains to operate the motor driver directly. Parallel ports are a direct connection from the processor commonly referred to as GPIO pins (General Purpose I/O pins) and provides a convenient and powerful way to interface with the computer. The parallel breakout board is included in those kits only to condition those signals for use with the drivers.

    The USB serves at the actual controller, sending the pulse trains, but the computer sends simple human readable instructions to the USB controller to tell the controller how to send pulses.

    The non-technical differences that may serve as the most important information to you is that the parallel configurations allow for a wider variety of industry standard software that can be used to control the cnc machine. The USB that we offer requires the operator to use a software called Planet-CNC software which is a very well made and feature full cnc control software.

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PARALLEL AND USB ELECTRONICS COMBOS MOTOR KITS

  • WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A PRINTER CABLE PORT AND USB MOTOR KITS

    The parallel (printer cable) port is uses the computer as its main source of pulse trains to operate the motor driver directly. Parallel ports are a direct connection from the processor commonly referred to as GPIO pins (General Purpose I/O pins) and provides a convenient and powerful way to interface with the computer. The parallel breakout board is included in those kits only to condition those signals for use with the drivers.

    The USB serves at the actual controller, sending the pulse trains, but the computer sends simple human readable instructions to the USB controller to tell the controller how to send pulses.

    The non-technical differences that may serve as the most important information to you is that the parallel configurations allow for a wider variety of industry standard software that can be used to control the cnc machine. The USB that we offer requires the operator to use a software called Planet-CNC software which is a very well made and feature full cnc control software.

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A PRINTER CABLE PORT AND USB MOTOR KITS

  • what is the difference between parallel and USB electronics. I have a laptop that will run the mach3 program.

    The parallel (printer cable) port is uses the computer as its main source of pulse trains to operate the motor driver directly. Parallel ports are a direct connection from the processor commonly referred to as GPIO pins (General Purpose I/O pins) and provides a convenient and powerful way to interface with the computer. The parallel breakout board is included in those kits only to condition those signals for use with the drivers.

    The USB serves at the actual controller, sending the pulse trains, but the computer sends simple human readable instructions to the USB controller to tell the controller how to send pulses.

    The non-technical differences that may serve as the most important information to you is that the parallel configurations allow for a wider variety of industry standard software that can be used to control the cnc machine. The USB that we offer requires the operator to use a software called Planet-CNC software which is a very well made and feature full cnc control software.

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    what is the difference between parallel and USB electronics. I have a laptop that will run the mach3 program.

  • I bought your 3 axis combo and need to know what name brand is the motors and their ounces and the drivers

    Surely you know the brand motors you sold me?

    Click the link to respond:
    I bought your 3 axis combo and need to know what name brand is the motors and their ounces and the drivers

  • What is the difference between the tinted laser goggles and the Honeywell laser CO2 goggles

    The Honeywell brand goggles meet ANSI certification Z136.1, relating to the safe use of lasers, and are calibrated to optimally block the specific wavelengths of light produced by CO2 lasers (the details are available in the website description here: https://buildyourcnc.com/item/laser-components-goggles-safety-honeywell.) The generic tinted goggles also block the specific CO2 laser wavelengths, but a good deal of other wavelengths as well. That and frame style variation is the basic difference.

    Click the link to respond:
    What is the difference between the tinted laser goggles and the Honeywell laser CO2 goggles

  • I was wondering what was the difference between the two pair of goggles you are selling for the blacktooth. The tinted laser goggles and the Honeywell laser CO2 goggles

    The Honeywell brand goggles meet ANSI certification Z136.1, relating to the safe use of lasers, and are calibrated to optimally block the specific wavelengths of light produced by CO2 lasers (the details are available in the website description here: https://buildyourcnc.com/item/laser-components-goggles-safety-honeywell.) The generic tinted goggles also block the specific CO2 laser wavelengths, but a good deal of other wavelengths as well. That and frame style variation is the basic difference.

    Click the link to respond:
    I was wondering what was the difference between the two pair of goggles you are selling for the blacktooth. The tinted laser goggles and the Honeywell laser CO2 goggles

  • I'm building my own machine using your motors and drivers. What is the best dip switch settings for the 3.0 amp drivers powering the 425 oz motors

    The settings that you will use for your 3.0 amp driver to properly power and turn your 425 oz-in stepper motor will cheifly depend on your application and the mechanical parts you are using on your machine. In all circumstances, the amp setting for the stepper motor (according to the datasheet) should be 2.8 amps. Use the closest setting on the driver without going over.

    Here is a good rule of thumb for the microstepping which will correspond to the resolution, but wil also affect torque. You always want to try to achieve the best torque and resolution for the axis you are moving but go with the lowest microstepping possible. In cases where there is mechanical advantage, like a lead screw scenario, where for each motor revolution, the axis move a very small amount, you will want a very low microstep value. This is because the mechanical configuration will provide most of the finer resolution and you will not need the microstepping to assist in this. Increase the microstepping only in conditions where the axis is not moving smooth enough, or where there is a mechanical disadvantage. A mechanical disadvantage would be where the stepper motor is causing a great amount of movement in the axis and the resolutions suffers from this condition. Increase the microstep value up to your desired resolution, but don't go over since the torque of the motor will decrease.

    Click the link to respond:
    I'm building my own machine using your motors and drivers. What is the best dip switch settings for the 3.0 amp drivers powering the 425 oz motors

  • What is the difference between 18/8 and 18/10 stainless steel?

    The first number is the amount of chromium that is contained in the stainless, i.e., 18 is 18% chromium. The second number is the amount of nickel, i.e., 8 stands for 8% nickel. So 18/8 means that this stainless steel contains 18% chromium and 8% nickel. 18/10 is 18% chromium and 10% nickel. The higher the numbers the more corrosion resistant the material. 18/0 is a misleading designation. Both 18/8 and 18/10 contain nickel and are part of the grade family "300 series" stainless. 18/0 means that there is 18% chromium but zero nickel. When there is no nickel the stainless grade family is the "400 series". 400 series are not as corrosion resistant as the 300 series and are magnetic, where the 300 series are non-magnetic.

    Click the link to respond:
    What is the difference between 18/8 and 18/10 stainless steel?

  • What is the difference between 18/8 and 18/10 stainless steel?

    304 contains 18% chromium and 8% nickel. 316 contains 16% chromium, 10% nickel and 2% molybdenum. The "moly" is added to help resist corrosion to chlorides (like sea water and de-icing salts)

    Click the link to respond:
    What is the difference between 18/8 and 18/10 stainless steel?

  • Can you supply a "KIT" to convert my 4060Z CNC to a Laser Cutter? What is the difference capabilities between the 40Watt and 80Watt?

    We can supply all of the laser components, but you will need to determine how to mount the components.

    Additional Information:
    Alternatively, you can purchase our greenBull machine that has the laser/spindle combo head. You can see the laser/spindle head here: https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/cnc-machine-laser-spindle-combo-head

    Click the link to respond:
    Can you supply a "KIT" to convert my 4060Z CNC to a Laser Cutter? What is the difference capabilities between the 40Watt and 80Watt?

  • Can you supply a "KIT" to convert my 4060Z CNC to a Laser Cutter? What is the difference capabilities between the 40Watt and 80Watt?

    We can supply all of the laser components, but you will need to determine how to mount the components.

    Additional Information:
    Alternatively, you can purchase our greenBull machine that has the laser/spindle combo head. You can see the laser/spindle head here: https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/cnc-machine-laser-spindle-combo-head

    Click the link to respond:
    Can you supply a "KIT" to convert my 4060Z CNC to a Laser Cutter? What is the difference capabilities between the 40Watt and 80Watt?

  • I notice your kits cost about 25% more than the same kit on ebay, is there a difference in quality or some other feature of your kits?

    The kits on eBay are generally older versions of the machine kits that came with less options.

    Click the link to respond:
    I notice your kits cost about 25% more than the same kit on ebay, is there a difference in quality or some other feature of your kits?

  • What resolution and level of repeatability can one usually expect from a kit-built cnc, and is there a significant difference between timing belt and chain drive systems?

    Repeatability is very good for these machines and can be as low as .001" depending on the way you control the machine. If you use the spindle, you can be moderately aggressive, but you will want to use a finishing pass to make sure the edges are exactly what you would expect. since this is a kit, there will be varying levels of repeatibility depending on how well the kit is assembled and maintained. Calibration, as with all machines, is a critical aspect of keeping repeatibility over time.

    Timing belts and chain are about the same when it comes to precision as long as the chain wraps most of the drive sprocket. There are differences to each of these systems as Kevlar with steel cables impregnated within the Kevlar and the steel used in roller chain have different coefficients of linear expansion (the expansion and contraction over temperature change), and roller chain may stretch over time, so it is important to maintain the machine by tensioning the chain and timing belt, and calibrating the machine over time and when the temperature changes significantly.

    Click the link to respond:
    What resolution and level of repeatability can one usually expect from a kit-built cnc, and is there a significant difference between timing belt and chain drive systems?