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Question #: 2283

Question: My stepper motor has little to no torque on anything less than 1/4 steps.. tested on two drivers verified to be working. Can this be remedied?

Current Solution

For our motors, you must verify the correct wiring for each.
425 oz-in motor: (Wiring: Red and Blue to A+, Yellow and Black to A-, White and Brown to B+ and Orange and Green to B-.)
651 oz-in motor: (Wiring: Red to A+, Green to A-, Yellow to B+ and Blue to B-).

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Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • My stepper motors stopped working all of a sudden. Mach 3 is running fine, just no signals getting to the motors. The lights on the motor drivers began blinking erratically when this started. Any advice where a problem like this can come from would be greatly appreciated.

    The drivers have quite a bit of protection, so you probably won't ruin anything. You motors are jumping and that is just the motors engaging from getting power from the power supply.

    There could be many reasons your motors don't turn. Consider these troubleshooting tips:

    - If you are using our parallel breakout board, make sure that the step pins are set for active low (config -> Ports and Pins -> Motor Outputs -> the steps pins should be enabled and set active low)

    - The parallel breakout board is powered (connect the USB to the computer using a USB cable)

    - In Mach3, make sure you have jog enabled (a little green button at thelower middle of the page in the program run screen).

    Additional Information:

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    My stepper motors stopped working all of a sudden. Mach 3 is running fine, just no signals getting to the motors. The lights on the motor drivers began blinking erratically when this started. Any advice where a problem like this can come from would be greatly appreciated.

  • What are the toggle switch settings on the stepper motor drivers for the .5 in. lead screw 10 tpi 2 turns per inch? Thankyou!

    On the top of the stepper motor drivers is a grid with the appropriate toggle switch positions for the lead screw being used. If it is 2 turns per inch, the proper toggle switch positions would be 01101110. Try this and see if it works.

    Click the link to respond:
    What are the toggle switch settings on the stepper motor drivers for the .5 in. lead screw 10 tpi 2 turns per inch? Thankyou!

  • I am working with a Spur gear that has a 15 tooth 3/8 bore/ 3/8 wide....is the 651ozin stepper motor compatible with this or do I need to get a different motor
  • What is the cp- and cw- on the 2.5 Stepper motor driver modular unit. my motor will not run. i believe this is my wireing issue

    Nema-17/23 are wired, notice that the nema-23 has a white and orange wire (those are not needed):
    Black to A+
    Green to A-
    Red to B+
    Blue to B-

    Also if using a parallel breakout board the wiring from the driver (https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-parallel-breakout-relay#prettyPhoto/2/):
    (X-axis 2-CP-,3-CW-)
    For our USB breakout board (https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-electronic-component-USB-Controller-Breakout#prettyPhoto/2/):
    (x-axis CP-,CW- to ground)

    Additional Information:
    I have USB breakout board connected as: CW-> 5V, CP -> CP, and GRD to GRD/COMM next to 12-24V Pin.
    The motor works perfectly in one direction.
    Will not jog in the other Direction.
    I still do not know what is CP- and CW- as it is not labeled on the board, unlike your other motor controllers.
    Can you submit a wiring diagram for the 2.5 AMP controller


    Additional Information:
    is there a wiring diagram to connect a usb break out board which has 4 pins for each axis output to thedb 25 connector on a driver board used with parallel port configuration

    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    What is the cp- and cw- on the 2.5 Stepper motor driver modular unit. my motor will not run. i believe this is my wireing issue

  • I'm going to use 2 stepper motors for my X-axis. Can I use the same connections on the B/O board to do this knowing I will need 2 separate driver boards.

    Yes, absolutely. If you need two motors for a single axis, you will want to use the same terminals for pulse and direction from the breakout board.

    More specifically, you will wire the step/pulse pin to both drivers, and the direction pin to both drivers. If the motors need to turn in different directions, simply swap the A and B coil connections on one of the motors.

    Click the link to respond:
    I'm going to use 2 stepper motors for my X-axis. Can I use the same connections on the B/O board to do this knowing I will need 2 separate driver boards.

  • How can i calculate how much can carry my stepper motor? i have these informations: (Detent Torque: 2.2N.cm; Rotor Inertia: 54g.cm2; Holding Torque: 40N.cm). It's a nema 17

    The holding torque will provide the best information for the calculation on how much your stepper motor will carry. But first, when you say carry, do you mean how much weight it can lift, how much inertia it can withstand during an acceleration and deceleration state or how fast it can accelerate or velocity it can maintain under load from the milling process?

    Click the link to respond:
    How can i calculate how much can carry my stepper motor? i have these informations: (Detent Torque: 2.2N.cm; Rotor Inertia: 54g.cm2; Holding Torque: 40N.cm). It's a nema 17

  • How can i calculate how much can carry my stepper motor? i have these informations: (Detent Torque: 2.2N.cm; Rotor Inertia: 54g.cm2; Holding Torque: 40N.cm). It's a nema 17

    The holding torque will provide the best information for the calculation on how much your stepper motor will carry. But first, when you say carry, do you mean how much weight it can lift, how much inertia it can withstand during an acceleration and deceleration state or how fast it can accelerate or velocity it can maintain under load from the milling process?

    Click the link to respond:
    How can i calculate how much can carry my stepper motor? i have these informations: (Detent Torque: 2.2N.cm; Rotor Inertia: 54g.cm2; Holding Torque: 40N.cm). It's a nema 17

  • I am converting a 12x36 lathe over to CNC, I am interested in a 2 axis kit. I would love one stepper motor to be no smaller than 1200oz. , and another at 6000z. Is this something that you could offer? I have two other cnc machines but this is my first converstion on my own.

    We may be able to source those motors. Curious, the 6000 oz-in motor is pretty big. Do you mind explaining the application of the CNC machine and the structure that would require the large motor?

    Additional Information:
    The largest motors we can offer is 3900 oz-in without any mechanical help. 6000 oz-in can be resolved by mechanical means as an alternative.

    Click the link to respond:
    I am converting a 12x36 lathe over to CNC, I am interested in a 2 axis kit. I would love one stepper motor to be no smaller than 1200oz. , and another at 6000z. Is this something that you could offer? I have two other cnc machines but this is my first converstion on my own.

  • I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can lift using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can lift using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

  • stepper motor runs smooth then rough for a moment then smooth, etc. Does this at all steps, and connected motors.

    This sounds like it could be a loose wire, or poor connection with the motor wires. Make sure all wires that are to be connected to each other are soldered and use a lineman's splice when putting the wires together. Also, make sure that the wires going into the driver is securely fastened.

    If this is an issue where the motors have run well for a long time then just started to show this performance issue, then make sure that there are no wire ties or other binding method that is chaffing the wires. This would make the motors run oddly at certain travel positions where the chafing has caused a short with the wires.

    If this is an issue where you don't have the motor plugged in at all and are just trying to turn it by hand and this phenomenon is occuring, then make sure all of the wires are not touching each other. When wires are touching each other and you are trying to spin the shaft by hand, the motor will feed current back into the motor making it difficult to turn.

    Click the link to respond:
    stepper motor runs smooth then rough for a moment then smooth, etc. Does this at all steps, and connected motors.

  • My X-axis on the Blacktoe cannot run above ~40 ipm. I've checked all connections,tensions, sprocket locks, etc. All is fine. Can the 425 OZ stepping motor be replaced with a bigger motor, or could a second 425 OZ stepper be added to increase torque?

    it is possible to install 2 motors on a single axis but you will require another driver and motor, but wire it directly to the same pins on your breakout board. Also the orientation of your motor since it is opposite side of the original so getting it to move accordingly to the original motor it will need to be orientated correctly. The slight shift could be the cause of the rod not being completely flat where the set screws are suppose to tighten the sprocket to the rod, so sanding it to a flatter surface might fix the shift in directions.
    Currently do not have a kit or schematic available.

    Click the link to respond:
    My X-axis on the Blacktoe cannot run above ~40 ipm. I've checked all connections,tensions, sprocket locks, etc. All is fine. Can the 425 OZ stepping motor be replaced with a bigger motor, or could a second 425 OZ stepper be added to increase torque?

  • I am having difficulty with the wiring on the White Ant. The latest electronics that I received don't seem to be anything like the book or even the tutorials. For instance, the three stepper drivers need 6 pin connectors and ribbon cable. How are they wired? There was no thermocouple wire included. Thanks,
  • I cannot find a driver for the NEMA 14 Stepping Motor (17 oz-in 1/4" dual shaft) on your site, would something like the Pololu DRV8834 be okay? (I note that the stepper requires 2.7v)
  • Can you guys make a video showing how to adjust the white pin combinations on the redleaf drivers, in relation to the various combinations needed for the different size stepper motors?

    The dip switch settings on the drivers have a table on the top of the driver itself. To determine the size of the motor and driver compatibility, you first need to associate the motor to the correct driver (i.e. if the motor requires 6 amps to deliver the rated torque, you will need a driver that can allow for a 6 amp draw). Second, if the motor is rated within the amp specs of the driver, then you need to look at the motor datasheet (located on the product page of each motor) and look at the amp rating related to the wiring scheme you selected (most likely bipolar parallel). Se the dip switches to select an amp that matches this rating found in the datasheet. Remember that the dip switch is ON if UP and OFF if DOWN. On = 1 and off = 0.

    If you think a video would be more helpful, please call us and we can discuss this.

    Click the link to respond:
    Can you guys make a video showing how to adjust the white pin combinations on the redleaf drivers, in relation to the various combinations needed for the different size stepper motors?

  • When I first hooked up my redFly and was manually testing all the axes, everything was going well, then my Y axis stopped working all together, and now my X and Z have stopped also and my redFly has a nasty smell coming from it and none of the stepper motors seem to be getting power.

    Since you mentioned there is a nasty smell, I'm wondering if there might have been a issue with the power supply. Can you email us your name for the order and specific voltage you are using for the redFly? at techsupport@buildyourcnc.com. Also I want to mention if you have the USB cord plugged in to the redFly if it has the parallel interface board?

    Click the link to respond:
    When I first hooked up my redFly and was manually testing all the axes, everything was going well, then my Y axis stopped working all together, and now my X and Z have stopped also and my redFly has a nasty smell coming from it and none of the stepper motors seem to be getting power.

  • I have a blacktooth laser engraver. The Y Axis stepper motor needs to be replaced. Can you please provide me with the information I would need to replace this motor.

    Yes, if you need a replacement part on your machine please call us at 281-815-7701.

    Click the link to respond:
    I have a blacktooth laser engraver. The Y Axis stepper motor needs to be replaced. Can you please provide me with the information I would need to replace this motor.

  • I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

  • I ordered the 3-axis medium stepper motor kit. The drivers i recieved were those for the 3-d printer main board, not the modular ones. How am i suppose to wire that up now?
  • My plasmacam cnc machine has servo motors with an optical encoder to provide position sensing. Can the pokeys57 cnc controller and drivers run those servos?

    Yes, the Pokeys57CNC can control standard CNC or plasma machine servos as servo drives accept step and direction signals just like stepper motors.

    Click the link to respond:
    My plasmacam cnc machine has servo motors with an optical encoder to provide position sensing. Can the pokeys57 cnc controller and drivers run those servos?