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Question #: 2384

Question: Using your NEMA 24 stepping motor with microstepping, can I get a speed range from 3 RPM to 600 RPM ?

Current Solution

The torque curve for the 651 oz-in stepping motor can be found here:

https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-nema34-651ozin#prettyPhoto

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Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • wiring for nema 24 stepping motor to microstep driver CW230. With BlueBrew board .

    Three steps are involved: wiring the stepper motor to the CW230 driver, wiring the CW230 driver to the parallel controller and wiring power to the CW230 driver.

    Wiring the NEMA stepper motor to the CW230 driver:
    This will depend on the number of wires are coming out of the stepper motor. If the stepper motor has 8 wires, you want to wire it in bipolar parallel configuration. Check the datasheet of the motor for this configuration. If the motor has 6 or 4 wires, you don't necessarily need the datasheet, but it is quicker and more helpful. Otherwise, you can use a multimeter to determine the correct wires. Since both coils will have the same resistance across each, you can use a multimeter set to ohms, or resistance, to determine the wires for each coil. If there is OL on the multimeter for any two wires, that means it is an Open Line, or no connection. That could only mean that those wires are not on the same coil. If the reading shows a number, then those wires are on the same coil, and on a 4 wire stepper motor, that will be the wires to connect to either the A or B coil. If the resistance is half of a resistance of another set on a 6 wire stepper motor, then on of those wires if at the midpoint of a coil. On 6 wire motors, only use the wire pair that have the highest resistance. Those will be the wires on the ends of each coil. Connect one pair to the A terminals and the other pair to the B terminals.

    Wiring the CW230 driver to the controller:
    The Step-, or sometimes called CP- is connected to one of the numbered terminals between 2 and 7 and the DIR-, sometimes called the CW-, is connected to one of the numbered terminals between 2 and 7. X is typically connected to 2, and 3, step and DIR respectively. Y is typically connected to 4 and 5. Z is typically connected to 6 and 7. The 5v is connected to Step+, or CP- and DIR+, or CW+.

    Make sure that Mach3, or LinuxCNC is configured for this configuration under ports and pins in Mach3, or the stepconf in LinuxCNC.

    Additional Information:
    Let me know if there are clarifications that are needed here.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    wiring for nema 24 stepping motor to microstep driver CW230. With BlueBrew board .

  • Can this driver accept 5 lead Nema 34 steppers: Stepping Motor Driver (24-70 volts DC, up to 6.0 amps, microstepping from 1/2 to 1/256)

    Please measure the resistance between all the wires in all combinations to determine where these wires exists with the coils. I am not familiar with 5 wire stepper motors.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    Can this driver accept 5 lead Nema 34 steppers: Stepping Motor Driver (24-70 volts DC, up to 6.0 amps, microstepping from 1/2 to 1/256)

  • I have your Nema 24 electronics kit and am having problems with the Z axis dropping over time. I am using a PC 8902 motor. Any ideas on what the problem is? What should be the motor tuning values in Mach3? Thanks

    Make sure all your bolts/screws are tighten correctly and if using a lead screw make sure your anti-backlash nut is not offset. Now a default setting will be 10101100 for your driver dip switch settings and in motor tuning (mach3) 1600 steps per, 400.02 velocity, 4 in acceleration. now the acceleration and velocity can be adjusted to move your machine faster, but if set to high they could stall. Make sure you have the correct wiring from your motor to your driver (https://www.buildyourcnc.com/Documents/PN.SM60HT86-2008BF-U%20(inhouse%20PN.60BYGH303-13)%20(1).pdf).

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I have your Nema 24 electronics kit and am having problems with the Z axis dropping over time. I am using a PC 8902 motor. Any ideas on what the problem is? What should be the motor tuning values in Mach3? Thanks

  • CAN I USE A STEPPING MOTOR WITH AN ENCODER?

    I haven't delved into using encoders with stepping motors too much. From my research, you need to have a controller that can provide the closed loop control, rather than software handling that process. I have also found from my research that using encoders on stepping motors is generally used to stop the machine in the case that the motor failed to achieve the commanded position for some reason and gives the user the chance to correct and continue with the job.

    If you want proper closed loop control, it may be best to go with servos and servo controller that provide the closed loop control within the real of those two components.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    CAN I USE A STEPPING MOTOR WITH AN ENCODER?

  • I bought Nema 24 motors and driver package with usb board. What do i need to have more speed? Cant even jog past 25 ipm without the motor stalling (not having enough torgue)

    We recommend checking the dip switch settings on your drivers, having the correct microstepping/amp settings along with the steps/unit will help the motors run as effective as possible.
    This is a default parameter that we use while we test our motors:
    Driver dip switch settings will be at a 1/16 microstepping and 2.7amp (11001100) for x/y-axis and the z-axis will be at 1/4 microstepping and 2.7amp (10101100).

    In planet-cnc with increasing the motor speed, you will have to modify the settings in planet-cnc (File/settings/setup) you will modify the initial speed, maximum speed, and the acceleration.
    X/Y-axis step/unit: 1422.22 initial speed:500 maximum speed:750 acceleration:25
    Z-axis step/unit: 1600 initial speed:100 maximum speed:300 acceleration:25
    The initial speed and maximum speed will have to be roughly tested and adjusted per application.
    Make sure to adjust the JOG slide bard underneath the axis controls on screen to about 750, to compensate for your x/y-axis adjustments. If left alone the speed will max out at the default setting.

    Here is a video tutorial to calculate the steps required depending on your mechanical linear motion components. (

    )

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I bought Nema 24 motors and driver package with usb board. What do i need to have more speed? Cant even jog past 25 ipm without the motor stalling (not having enough torgue)

  • I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can lift using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can lift using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

  • I cannot find a driver for the NEMA 14 Stepping Motor (17 oz-in 1/4" dual shaft) on your site, would something like the Pololu DRV8834 be okay? (I note that the stepper requires 2.7v)
  • Which power supply, 36V/8.8A or 24V/8.3, to drive one Nema 43 stepping motor?

    You can find the wiring diagram, and technical specifications for the NEMA 23 motor, on it's product page, found here,

    https://www.buildyourcnc.com/Item/electronicsAndMotors-nema23-100ozin-newbiehack-motors-stepping_motors-100_ozin

    There is a datasheet below the product description. This image will expand to be easier visible once clicked on.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    Which power supply, 36V/8.8A or 24V/8.3, to drive one Nema 43 stepping motor?

  • Which power supply, 36V/8.8A or 24V/8.3, to drive one Nema 43 stepping motor?

    The NEMA 43 motor we stock has a 5.5A draw, which we recommend to pair with our 6.0 amp driver and 36V 8.8A Power Supply.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    Which power supply, 36V/8.8A or 24V/8.3, to drive one Nema 43 stepping motor?

  • can I control the speed of a 2.2 spindle through your 5 axis breakout board with relay?

    Yes, you can control the speed of the 2.2 kW spindle, and the other spindles we sell, through Mach3 software. It requires making some changes to the settings in Mach3 and in your inverter. It also requires an additional part, which is called a USB to Serial Converter, found on our site here:

    https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/Interfaces-newbiehack-Interfaces-TTL232R-USB-UART-Serial

    I have some additional instructions, that I will send upon request, by email. I will also be adding a complete tutorial and video, to the website, on how to do this soon.

    Additional Information:
    20

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    can I control the speed of a 2.2 spindle through your 5 axis breakout board with relay?

  • Are there torque-speed curves available for the NEMA 34 Stepping Motor (651 oz-in 1/2" dual shaft)?

    The torque curve for the 651 oz-in stepping motor can be found here:

    https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-nema34-651ozin#prettyPhoto

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    Are there torque-speed curves available for the NEMA 34 Stepping Motor (651 oz-in 1/2" dual shaft)?

  • I am asking what to set my steps per using your kit stepper motors and a 1/2"x13 lead screw with Mach3

    Here is the formula for steps/inch (steps per inch)

    Steps = how many steps for a full ration of the motor = standard motor steps x number of microsteps for each step
    Standard motor steps for our stepping motors is 200 steps per revolution.
    Microsteps are selected on the driver and are shown as full, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32 etc... Use the denominator for the number of microsteps per step.

    Inches = how far the travel is for one full rotation of the motor. For the 1/2" - 13 TPI (threads per inch), the travel length will be 1"/13 or .076923". So, for one revolution of the motor, the travel distance will be .076923 inches.

    So, the steps = 200 * microsteps, let's make this 1/4 just for the formula.
    The inches will be .076923. Plug those into the formula:
    Steps / inch = (200 * 4) / .076923 This can also be written as:
    200 * 4 / (1 / 13) = 10,400

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I am asking what to set my steps per using your kit stepper motors and a 1/2"x13 lead screw with Mach3

  • I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

  • I HAVE NOT SEEN ANY REFERENCES TO STEPPING MOTOR ENCODER FEED-BACK FOR CLOSED LOOP CAPABILITY IN OF THE HARDWARE YOU SELL. THIS A SUPPORTED FEATURE WITH HARDWARE/SOFTWARE SELL?

    I haven't delved into using encoders with stepping motors too much. From my research, you need to have a controller that can provide the closed loop control, rather than software handling that process. I have also found from my research that using encoders on stepping motors is generally used to stop the machine in the case that the motor failed to achieve the commanded position for some reason and gives the user the chance to correct and continue with the job.

    If you want proper closed loop control, it may be best to go with servos and servo controller that provide the closed loop control within the real of those two components.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I HAVE NOT SEEN ANY REFERENCES TO STEPPING MOTOR ENCODER FEED-BACK FOR CLOSED LOOP CAPABILITY IN OF THE HARDWARE YOU SELL. THIS A SUPPORTED FEATURE WITH HARDWARE/SOFTWARE SELL?

  • What is the number of pole pairs and rotor inertia for NEMA 23 Stepping motor?

    You can find the wiring diagram, and technical specifications for the NEMA 23 motor, on it's product page, found here,

    https://www.buildyourcnc.com/Item/electronicsAndMotors-nema23-100ozin-newbiehack-motors-stepping_motors-100_ozin

    There is a datasheet below the product description. This image will expand to be easier visible once clicked on.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    What is the number of pole pairs and rotor inertia for NEMA 23 Stepping motor?

  • What is the difference between a NEMA 23 and NEMA 24 motor? can I use either one on a machine?

    The frame size difference of the NEMA 23 and 24 is very slight and, depending on the motor mount both will most likely fit. The bigger difference between these stepping motors is the torque. Make sure that the motor that you purchase has the appropriate torque for the axis that it will move.

    Is is safe to go with the higher torque? Or if the torque is too high for what i need is that bad?

    You can use a motor with higher torque. Just make sure to select the correct driver for that motor.

    Additional Information:
    The frame size has nothing to do with torque. Nema 23 means a 2.3" frame. Nema 24 means a 2.4" frame. That's all. Either could have more or less torque depending on speed and power.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    What is the difference between a NEMA 23 and NEMA 24 motor? can I use either one on a machine?

  • What is the difference between a NEMA 23 and NEMA 24 motor? can I use either one on a machine?

    The frame size difference of the NEMA 23 and 24 is very slight and, depending on the motor mount both will most likely fit. The bigger difference between these stepping motors is the torque. Make sure that the motor that you purchase has the appropriate torque for the axis that it will move.

    Is is safe to go with the higher torque? Or if the torque is too high for what i need is that bad?

    You can use a motor with higher torque. Just make sure to select the correct driver for that motor.

    Additional Information:
    The frame size has nothing to do with torque. Nema 23 means a 2.3" frame. Nema 24 means a 2.4" frame. That's all. Either could have more or less torque depending on speed and power.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    What is the difference between a NEMA 23 and NEMA 24 motor? can I use either one on a machine?

  • Can you sell me a kit to control my motor from the pc? I already have a motor, driver and power supply.

    All you need is a CNC controller like the following options:

    https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-electronic-component-breakout-Mach3-USB-Board

    This controller is easy to connect using standard wire screw terminals and works with the mach3 control software.

    https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-electronic-component-breakout-Mach4-mach3-USB-ethernet-Board

    This controller is a little bit more difficult to connect, but is a more feature-rich controller and will work with both mach3 and mach4 CNC control software titles.

    Specifically, a CNC controller connects to the computer via a USB cable and connects to the motor drivers. These controllers also connect to the limit switches, spindle/router control, air/fluid/mist control, etc.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    Can you sell me a kit to control my motor from the pc? I already have a motor, driver and power supply.

  • Where can I get a motor driver "TX14207", or a substitute with instructions?

    I would recommend using our 5.6 amp driver as a replacement for the TX14207 driver. Apparently, those drivers are found in the 6040 CNC routers and will not contain documentation since it is typically sold as a part of a greater assembly. Here is the link to the recommended driver:
    https://buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-stepper-driver-6!0a

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    Where can I get a motor driver "TX14207", or a substitute with instructions?

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