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Question #: 852

Question: thank you for the reply. I would be really good to know the calculation. The lead screw is 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI. Please provide the calculation for determing the maximum weight motor can handle on Z-axis on book build cnc. And one more question. If I am cutting 18mm MDF with 6mm cutting bit (so 6mm pass), what can be the maximum speed rate of cutting and spindle speed of router? thank you

Current Solution

There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

where:
p = pitch of the screw
Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
R = radius of the lead screw


This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

Example:

Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

Lets see if we get similar results:

Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

Customer Response:
thank you so much

Additional Information:


Additional Information:


Additional Information:
how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

Additional Information:
Pls


Additional Information:
1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

Respond:

Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • Since I am using normal all-thread lead screw 13 TPI 1/2" for the book build cnc, what can be the maximum feed rate of machine and how can I change the mechanical setup in mach 3? I am using 1/4" steel carbile endmill with 2 flutes and router is 2 HP with variable speed

    Book build (scratch build), feedrates and recommendation.

    Using standard allthread will provide around 20-30 ipm using 36 volts. Although it allows for a working CNC machine, the RPM of the spindle/router will need to spin at the lowest setting to provide the beat efficiency and life for the end mill at 1/4" cut diameter and higher. The speeds may be fine for smaller end mills.

    If you would like faster speeds, you should change the lead screws on the CNC machine to the 1/2" 5 start 10 TPI which translates to 2 turns per inch which means, the stepping motor will not need to turn as fast to produce faster motion. That is to say, the stepping motor will only need to turn two revolutions for the machine to travel one inch and with the allthread, the stepping motor will need to turn 13 times to reach one inch.

    Link to the lead screw and other mechanical parts needed:
    https://www.buildyourcnc.com/CNCMachineMechanicalParts.aspx

    To change the lead screws you will need (for each axis):

    1. The lead screw for that axis.
    2. Two 1/2" collars to keep the lead screw axially stable.
    3. One Antibacklash nut.

    Additional Information:
    20

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    Since I am using normal all-thread lead screw 13 TPI 1/2" for the book build cnc, what can be the maximum feed rate of machine and how can I change the mechanical setup in mach 3? I am using 1/4" steel carbile endmill with 2 flutes and router is 2 HP with variable speed

  • If I am cutting 18mm MDF with 6mm cutting bit (so 6mm pass), what can be the maximum speed rate of cutting and spindle speed of router?

    The best way to determine the cutting speed is to determine this with respect to the edge quality you desire. This recommendation generally comes from the major end mill manufacturers.

    The feedrate (travel speed) should be determined by the chip load of the end mill, the number of flutes, material of the end mill (Solid Carbide, HSS - High Speed Steel, Cobalt, etc.) and the RPM of the spindle. You will need to see the manufacturer's specifications of the end mill to determine this information.

    Formula:
    Chip Load = (feed rate IPM)/(Spindle RPM x Number of Flutes)

    or

    Feed Rate IPM = Chip Load x Spindle RPM x Number of Flutes

    Once you find this information, apply this to the material at the full depth of the end mill. If you find that your edge condition is aberrant, pull back on either the speed, or the depth per pass. If the edge condition is acceptable, then push the speed higher until the edge condition starts to deteriorate in quality and then pull back to the accepted level.

    Using this method, you will be able to reduce the wear on the end mil which will be the most expensive consumable on the machine.

    Additional Information:

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    If I am cutting 18mm MDF with 6mm cutting bit (so 6mm pass), what can be the maximum speed rate of cutting and spindle speed of router?

  • Hi, I’m purchasing an ox build workbee cnc router from China but I need to purchase the spindle mount, router and all cables/wires. Please can you give a list and quote of what I will need? I am purchasing the electrical pack with it but it doesn’t come with the cables and all other bits I need. Thank tou
  • I received the electronics for book build cnc machine. I need to know how much weight the z-axis motor can hold since my (craftsman) router seems to be heavy. It is 2HP with variable speed

    The motor is helped by the mechanical leverage of the screw. The 425 oz-in motors that are included in the standard electronics combo has very high torque for that type of machine. You will have no problem using that motor for the book machine.

    We use that motor for very heavy spindles on the blackToe and blackFoot CNC Machine kits.

    You will need to do the mechanical leverage calculation along with the torque of the motor to determine the actual weight it will lift. The calculation will need to consider the type and pitch of the screw and it would also consider the gravity constant of 9.8 m/s/s.

    If you need me to determine this formula and work out the calculation based on the screw you are using, please let me know.

    Additional Information:
    thank you for the reply. I would be really good to know the calculation. The lead screw is 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI. Please provide the calculation. And one more question. If I am cutting 18mm MDF with 6mm cutting bit (so 6mm pass), what can be the maximum speed rate of cutting and spindle speed of router?
    thank you

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I received the electronics for book build cnc machine. I need to know how much weight the z-axis motor can hold since my (craftsman) router seems to be heavy. It is 2HP with variable speed

  • On the Book Build: I'm changing the 13TPI 1/2" lead screw with the 1/2" 10 TPI Acme screw with the anti backlash nut. This is for the Z axis only. What should I know about installing it and what are the numbers I need to plug into the motor tuning area.

    The settings that will have to be change will be your steps per inch in motor tuning (mach 3), or settings/axes(planetCNC). But we do not have the actual numbers/specs that will fit your 10 TPI 5 start lead screw, here is a tutorial video which explains how to get the exact numbers you need! (

    ).
    Here is a default setting that you might be able to tune and adjust accordingly: 1600 steps, accel 400.02, velocity 5.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    On the Book Build: I'm changing the 13TPI 1/2" lead screw with the 1/2" 10 TPI Acme screw with the anti backlash nut. This is for the Z axis only. What should I know about installing it and what are the numbers I need to plug into the motor tuning area.

  • I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

  • What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift? Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)) In this formula, is Sf (static force) include gravity? how much usually is static force? can you please give one example to calculate max. weight Z-axis can carry?

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift? Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)) In this formula, is Sf (static force) include gravity? how much usually is static force? can you please give one example to calculate max. weight Z-axis can carry?

  • Regarding 1/2" 5 start and 10 TPI ACME precision lead screw, what the maximum length you can ship within USA? I'm looking for something like 100" and I could use a 1" screw if available. Please include estimated price. Thanks.

    The maximum length we can ship is a total of 78" inches. However we can send your required length in portions. Please refer to adding the total items you require to your cart to get a visualized amount and shipping cost.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    Regarding 1/2" 5 start and 10 TPI ACME precision lead screw, what the maximum length you can ship within USA? I'm looking for something like 100" and I could use a 1" screw if available. Please include estimated price. Thanks.

  • I am looking at purchasing the greenbull 5X system with the laser/spindle combination. Can the laser do both rastered engraving as well as vectored cutting with the same breakout board and software? If I have this wrong please let me know what would be needed to accompish this.

    You can do raster and vector engraving on the greenBull laser/spindle combination. The methods of this process is not accomplished in the same way as the typical laser machines where CorelDRAW is used. The Mach3 laser plug-in can be used for the raster engraving and standard CNC g-code can be used for vector cutting and engraving.

    The raster method will not be fast on the greenBull since the z-axis is heavy and there are inertial limitation on doing fast raster back and forth movement. Vector is the best use of this machine.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I am looking at purchasing the greenbull 5X system with the laser/spindle combination. Can the laser do both rastered engraving as well as vectored cutting with the same breakout board and software? If I have this wrong please let me know what would be needed to accompish this.

  • I would like to build the 2’x 4’ blackToe2x4v40 CNC router. I have your book. I want to build the latest model blackToe2x4 v40. Are those the correct plans on your web book page ? Is there a bill of materials? If I use a Porter Cable 3-3/4 router motor what size stepper motors do I need?

    The blackToe 2'x4' cnc machine is sold as a kit only. We offer plans for the scratch (book) build machine that can be found here for purchase and also comes with a DVD showing the build process: http://www.buildyourcnc.com/cnckitintro.aspx and the plans for build in the book is on the CNC book page: http://www.buildyourcnc.com/Book.aspx.

    You can use the same size stepping motors referenced in the book: http://www.buildyourcnc.com/category/elcombo

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I would like to build the 2’x 4’ blackToe2x4v40 CNC router. I have your book. I want to build the latest model blackToe2x4 v40. Are those the correct plans on your web book page ? Is there a bill of materials? If I use a Porter Cable 3-3/4 router motor what size stepper motors do I need?

  • I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can lift using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can lift using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

  • Building one of your greenBull 6X Long and 2.2 kilowatt spindle does not fit. Seems lead screw you sent with kit is short 42" looks like it needs to be 5 or 6 inch longer. Is this correct? What is the needed length of lead screw for this unit?
  • Hi, I have intention of purchasing your 1/2 inch precision lead screw set to build my CNC machine, could I have the schematic dimension of your 1/2 inch anti-backlash nut, bearing for the lead screw and the shim? Also is your 2.2kW spindle able to mill Aluminum and what is the accuracy?

    BYCNC response:

    Milling aluminum is no problem with our machines.

    Here is a video we recently did with our 4'x8' machine. The aluminum piece is about 1/4" thick: https://buildyourcnc.com/tutorials/tutorial-greenbull-aluminum-cutting

    The accuracy you will see from our our 2.2kW spindle is entirely dependent on the precision of your build, so it's not possible to say what level of accuracy you can achieve without an examination of the complete system. However, our spindles have a runout of less than .0001 in, which includes the collets that we sell. If you use a collet from another manufacturer, we cannot guarantee this TIR (Total Indicated Runout) dimension.

    For the dimension drawing of the anti-backlash nut, please contact us directly by phone or email to techsupport@buildyourcnc.com

    User response:
    I have emailed waiting for your reply.

    User response:
    Hi, I am still waiting for your email reply.

    BYCNC response:
    Your email has been sent.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    Hi, I have intention of purchasing your 1/2 inch precision lead screw set to build my CNC machine, could I have the schematic dimension of your 1/2 inch anti-backlash nut, bearing for the lead screw and the shim? Also is your 2.2kW spindle able to mill Aluminum and what is the accuracy?

  • I have wired up my 110v VFD and my 2.2Kw spindle and I get an E.Lu.5 code. My wiring is correct and the parameters are set to those for the VFD according to your website I found in a previously answered question from someone here. Any help would be greatly appreciated, thank you!!

    The E.Lu.5 Error code on your VFD is related to Low Voltage.

    The recommended action is:
    - 1. Check whether the input voltage is normal. (the voltage from the wall/breaker to the VFD)
    - 2. Check whether there is a sudden change in load.
    - 3. Check whether there is any phase missing.

    Unfortunately, these three recommended actions will probable require an electrician to test the line going into the VFD.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    I have wired up my 110v VFD and my 2.2Kw spindle and I get an E.Lu.5 code. My wiring is correct and the parameters are set to those for the VFD according to your website I found in a previously answered question from someone here. Any help would be greatly appreciated, thank you!!

  • Can you install a more powerful laser/tube for us if we pick the $2100 option to have you build it? It would be assumed that there would be a new price for the machine which would reflect the cost increase for the new laser. Please say yes, I know you can physically do it. I have faith in you

    The space allotted for the laser tube on the blackTooth would not allow for a higher power laser tube. As the wattage of the laser tube increased, so does the length of the tube.

    We do have a larger and more powerful laser in design and should be available in the second quarter of 2015.

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    Can you install a more powerful laser/tube for us if we pick the $2100 option to have you build it? It would be assumed that there would be a new price for the machine which would reflect the cost increase for the new laser. Please say yes, I know you can physically do it. I have faith in you

  • Hi my names is Minh Truong I would like to said thank you very much for your video I got the system mach3 working fine but one thing I can NOT set and config the digitizer on the board IN4 I am not sure how to setup because in the Mach3 pin 14 for digitizer Please shoe me hoe to set it up for the digitizer.
  • BUILDING ONE OF YOUR GREENBULL 6X LONG AND 2.2 KILOWATT SPINDLE DOES NOT FIT. SEEMS LEAD SCREW YOU SENT WITH KIT IS SHORT 42" LOOKS LIKE IT NEEDS TO BE 5 OR 6 INCH LONGER. THIS CORRECT? WHAT THE NEEDED LENGTH FOR UNIT?
  • Hi, I am very interested in this CNC Router unit [4'x8'], but from South Africa with our exchange rat [1$ =13,4 ZAR presently, make these kits out of reach. The plans part has been discontinued, but in our situation, would you reconsider and supply full plans and instructions at a cost? please let me know.

    Dealing with a 4' x 12' machine, our blackFoot kit will be your best option. Since our machines are only limited to the width but not length wise, you can add however much extra rail and roller chain to accommodate your extended length. Now adding our 4th axis kit (https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/axes-4th) will be needed for your 4th axis (unless custom design is required).

    These items will be the best requirements to build a 4' x 12' 4th axis machine.
    Machine (either parallel/USB BoB): https://www.buildyourcnc.com/blackFoot48v40.aspx
    4th axis: https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/axes-4th

    Click the link to add information to this solution:
    Hi, I am very interested in this CNC Router unit [4'x8'], but from South Africa with our exchange rat [1$ =13,4 ZAR presently, make these kits out of reach. The plans part has been discontinued, but in our situation, would you reconsider and supply full plans and instructions at a cost? please let me know.

  • Hi, I am very interested in this CNC Router unit [4'x8'], but from South Africa with our exchange rat [1$ =13,4 ZAR presently, make these kits out of reach. The plans part has been discontinued, but in our situation, would you reconsider and supply full plans and instructions at a cost? please let me know.
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