[ Log In ]
[ Register ]
NEW: CNC Router PLANS Available for all of our Newest CNC Models!! Click here to "Design Your CNC".

Question #: 9017

Question: I JUST RECEIVED MY WHITE ANT AND STARTED TO DO SOME BASIC ASSEMBLY. NOTICE THAT THE 1/4 X 20 BOLTS WITH PHILLIPS HEAD NOT FIT IN NOTCHES CUT FOR THEM - INSTANCE, ON DREMEL MOUNT. AM SUPPOSED BUY DIFFERENT HEADS, GRIND ALL DOWN, OR ROUTE OUT BIGGER NOTCHES. 3" BARELY Z-AXIS MOTOR

Current Solution

BYCNC Response:
Please send a photo of the bolts and assembly so we can determine the problem. Thanks.

User Response:
The holes on the Dremel holder are 0.442" and the bolt heads are 0.483". Picture will be sent. In the picture note that the left bolt has been ground down.

BYCNC Response:
You were sent incorrect fasteners due to a vendor change. We will be shipping the correct parts to you immediately, and thank you for letting us know about this mistake.

Respond:

Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • I just received my White Ant and started to do some basic assembly. I notice that the 1/4 x 20 bolts with Phillips head do not fit in the notches cut for them - for instance, on the Dremel mount. Am I supposed to buy bolts with different heads, grind them all down, or route out bigger notches. The 3" bolts barely fit in the Z-axis motor mount.

    BYCNC Response:
    Please send a photo of the bolts and assembly so we can determine the problem. Thanks.

    User Response:
    The holes on the Dremel holder are 0.442" and the bolt heads are 0.483". Picture will be sent. In the picture note that the left bolt has been ground down.

    BYCNC Response:
    You were sent incorrect fasteners due to a vendor change. We will be shipping the correct parts to you immediately, and thank you for letting us know about this mistake.

    Click the link to respond:
    I just received my White Ant and started to do some basic assembly. I notice that the 1/4 x 20 bolts with Phillips head do not fit in the notches cut for them - for instance, on the Dremel mount. Am I supposed to buy bolts with different heads, grind them all down, or route out bigger notches. The 3" bolts barely fit in the Z-axis motor mount.

  • I am having difficulty with the wiring on the White Ant. The latest electronics that I received don't seem to be anything like the book or even the tutorials. For instance, the three stepper drivers need 6 pin connectors and ribbon cable. How are they wired? There was no thermocouple wire included. Thanks,
  • I purchased the blackTooth Laser Engraver with integrated Laser Control Unit and have been following your instructions. I noticed that the laser tube power supply is different that what is shown in your instructions. Do you have any better wiring guides that I can follow for the version that I received?

    There is some variation in the outward appearance of laser power supplies due to sourcing through different vendors. However, the basic wiring requirements are the same in each case. For the unit with integrated laser controller, follow the diagram found here: https://buildyourcnc.com/blackToothLaserCutterAndEngraver.aspx#prettyPhoto/0/. The terminals on the signal side will have a 6 connection terminal block -- these are the ones labeled 5V, IN, G, P (or WP), L (or TTL-L), and H (or TTL-H). The High Power side will have 3 inputs for AC power, one high voltage lead, and one return line. Connect these as shown in the diagram as well: the return line goes on the "front" (beam exit end) terminal of the laser tube, the high voltage lead goes to the "back" terminal of the tube, the FG terminal (or G) receives the earth ground wire of the AC power cable, and the two AC terminals receive the line and neutral wires of the AC power cable (it doesn't matter in this case which wire goes to which terminal).

    Click the link to respond:
    I purchased the blackTooth Laser Engraver with integrated Laser Control Unit and have been following your instructions. I noticed that the laser tube power supply is different that what is shown in your instructions. Do you have any better wiring guides that I can follow for the version that I received?

  • received my mach 3 USB breakout board today. The layout of the board is different from your diagram which shows a 5V power slot for each axis. Do I wire the 5V slot with only one 5V wire from one of the drivers or perhaps wire all three 5V wires into the one 5 V slot. Please advise.

    The board layout is different and the terminals have slightly different names, but the two boards function the same. The wiring diagram is the same for both boards. The plug-in driver for Mach3 is also the same, so you should not have a problem. If you do run into an issue, please let me know here and I will help you determine the problem.

    Thanks

    Additional Information:
    Thank you for the assurance that the boards will function the same. You did not answer the primary question of wiring. The diagram shows a board with a 5V for each axis, the new boards have only 1 5V point on the axis side. In retrospect since this controller receives information and most possibly the 5V signal directly from the computer leading to the drivers. I will wire the X, Y and Z axis to the single 5V point and see what happens.

    Click the link to respond:
    received my mach 3 USB breakout board today. The layout of the board is different from your diagram which shows a 5V power slot for each axis. Do I wire the 5V slot with only one 5V wire from one of the drivers or perhaps wire all three 5V wires into the one 5 V slot. Please advise.

  • we just received two nema 11 stepper motors per our order--USR2-2, however they are single shaft, we need double shaft, I thought that's what we ordered. We're sending them back, let me know if you do have the double shaft version and I'll try again to order them. I notice the model number on the motor ends in "A", where the packing slip shows "B".

    We just received our new inventory of motors and that specific stepper motor ski came back with only one shaft. I’m not at the office to look at this inventory, so if that is true, they will all be single shaft. We may have other stepper motors with included rear shafts, but I will have to see on Monday.

    If I don’t have the double shaft, we will provide a refund upon receipt of the motors. My apologies for this error.

    Additional Information:
    Hi, I'm sending these motors back today. As I understand you, you might have some motors from the previous lot still in stock, and these would be double shaft but otherwise you don't have any and won't be getting any. If you do have two double shaft versions of this motor please send them; if you don't have two of them please let me know--today if possible--so I can start looking elsewhere. Thanks, Ted Armen

    Click the link to respond:
    we just received two nema 11 stepper motors per our order--USR2-2, however they are single shaft, we need double shaft, I thought that's what we ordered. We're sending them back, let me know if you do have the double shaft version and I'll try again to order them. I notice the model number on the motor ends in "A", where the packing slip shows "B".

  • Having some repeatability issues on Y axis of the blackFoot CNC Router. doing motor tuning, but also notice the Y axis idler pulley doesn't stand up straight. Bearing seems good, just loose on the bolt. Do i try to shim between bearing to bolt or shim the sides to make it stay up straight?

    First, make sure that the alignment of the roller chain is straight with respect to where the roller chains are affixed at the ends of the gantry. This is of chief importance as there will be a clicking sound if there is no alignment. Also, make sure the idler sprocket can move from side to side to auto-correct on alignment, unless you can fit nuts or shim washers on either side to maintain the perfect position with respect to the alignment of the chain.

    The misalignment of the chain is most likely the reason the idler sprocket is slanted at an angle.

    If you are having repeatibility issues, make sure the drive sprocket is very tight on the motor shaft, and that the set screw is tightened on the flat of the stepper motor shaft. This is the typical culprit if any of the axes are having repeatability problems. It is difficult to determine if the drive sprocket is loose. Make sure to push with a bit of force to determine this.

    Additional Information:
    ok, took the y axis apart. Checked the drive sprocket. it seems tight. Although I did not take it off and put it back on. Checked the chain alignment edge to edge using a straight edge along the y drive rail and no clicking. tightened the chain and seemed to have it now off the same distance to the other side of the Y. I lossened it back up but no noticeable change.
    using Mach3 spindle not running, just a pointer bit in and feed rate 50ipm
    9k line gcode it's off by about .1 to .14 (ran code 4 different times, once in opposite corner of table) 130k gcode it's off 1.3 to 1.5 (ran code 4 different times, once in opposite corner of table). Not sure what to do, using the using the mach3 motor tuning it seems really close, and it's always the Y. should I swap wiring on the x & y drivers to see if problem goes to X?


    Additional Information:
    You can give the swap a try. It would rule out a possible wiring/driver/motor issue. If that doesn't work, we will need to go email so we can see pics to get a clearer understanding of the issue.

    Additional Information:
    So, I couldn't swap X and Y as X has a big honkin' motor. So I swapped the Driver for Y and Z, ran the same 130k line gcode and Y was spot on, but now Z is off. it was only off by .01 but there wasn't as much Z movement as there was Y of course. To me this would point to the driver. What do you think?

    Click the link to respond:
    Having some repeatability issues on Y axis of the blackFoot CNC Router. doing motor tuning, but also notice the Y axis idler pulley doesn't stand up straight. Bearing seems good, just loose on the bolt. Do i try to shim between bearing to bolt or shim the sides to make it stay up straight?

  • I'm assembling the gantry for a 5x10 greenbull and noticed that there are 9 spaces for torsion spacers but only 7 in the kit. Should I just space them out on the right side behind the motor?

    That is correct. We send the fewer ribs than could be fastened within the gantry. One reduction of a rib will provide more space for the motor at the midpoint of the gantry and at the other side of the gantry (opposite the motor) can be reduced to provide more space to work with the coupling.

    Click the link to respond:
    I'm assembling the gantry for a 5x10 greenbull and noticed that there are 9 spaces for torsion spacers but only 7 in the kit. Should I just space them out on the right side behind the motor?

  • My cnc router started doing strange things today after about 20 minutes into a fairly simple project. I noticed the red lights were flashing in my 4 Stepping Motor Drivers (24-70. Does anyone know where I should look to solve my problem?

    Can you describe strange a bit further? Also which specific drivers are you using? CW230 or 3.0A driver? or the 6.0A driver or CW8060?

    Click the link to respond:
    My cnc router started doing strange things today after about 20 minutes into a fairly simple project. I noticed the red lights were flashing in my 4 Stepping Motor Drivers (24-70. Does anyone know where I should look to solve my problem?

  • Hello! Question about the x motor on the vlxl. There is no black lead. Is the yellow in its position? Also, I really just want to double check that this wiring diagram is solid. About to finish the wiring. Juan told me to use the 36V for the tube and 24 for the drivers. Correct?

    The stepper motor on the X axis on the VLXL is this motor here:
    https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-nema34-651ozin

    There is no black lead on that motor and the connection diagram can be found here:
    https://www.buildyourcnc.com/Documents/PN.SM86HT80-5504B-U(inhouse%20PN.85BYGH450A-47-80)%20(1).pdf

    Red - A+
    Green - A-
    Yellow - B+
    Blue - B-

    The wiring diagram on the instructions for the Vertical Laser XL is meant as a general guide for all laser systems. The motor specific to the axis should be checked against the datasheet to insure proper wiring.

    The 24V power supply should be connected to the laser controller. The 36V power supply should be connected to the drivers to power the motion electronics.

    Additional Information:
    My fault. Must have had that backwards. I'm sure he told me the right way.

    Additional Information:
    Not a problem. The laser controller has two terminals labeled for the 24V connection.

    The 36V power supply works really well for stepper motor drivers as the voltage/current on this power supply allows for best stepper motor performance with this laser application.

    Click the link to respond:
    Hello! Question about the x motor on the vlxl. There is no black lead. Is the yellow in its position? Also, I really just want to double check that this wiring diagram is solid. About to finish the wiring. Juan told me to use the 36V for the tube and 24 for the drivers. Correct?

  • I received the electronics for book build cnc machine. I need to know how much weight the z-axis motor can hold since my (craftsman) router seems to be heavy. It is 2HP with variable speed

    The motor is helped by the mechanical leverage of the screw. The 425 oz-in motors that are included in the standard electronics combo has very high torque for that type of machine. You will have no problem using that motor for the book machine.

    We use that motor for very heavy spindles on the blackToe and blackFoot CNC Machine kits.

    You will need to do the mechanical leverage calculation along with the torque of the motor to determine the actual weight it will lift. The calculation will need to consider the type and pitch of the screw and it would also consider the gravity constant of 9.8 m/s/s.

    If you need me to determine this formula and work out the calculation based on the screw you are using, please let me know.

    Additional Information:
    thank you for the reply. I would be really good to know the calculation. The lead screw is 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI. Please provide the calculation. And one more question. If I am cutting 18mm MDF with 6mm cutting bit (so 6mm pass), what can be the maximum speed rate of cutting and spindle speed of router?
    thank you

    Click the link to respond:
    I received the electronics for book build cnc machine. I need to know how much weight the z-axis motor can hold since my (craftsman) router seems to be heavy. It is 2HP with variable speed

  • Building the 5x10 GreenBull, I went to install the ribs on the mid section of the gantry and you say in the video to skip a spot for the motor to sit, but I have 3 sections that are going to blank not just one like you show in the video. Do I skip more than one, am I missing ribs?

    We apologize for the confusion! The current greenBull kit in the video is a 4' x 8' gB CNC machine, so we currently have a shorter Y-axis length, compared to the 5X/6X kits. However with the gB 5X you should skip every other section(or something similar so it is symmetrical), since we added the option for you to increase the number of ribs if you wish, but is not necessary for the CNC machine.

    Click the link to respond:
    Building the 5x10 GreenBull, I went to install the ribs on the mid section of the gantry and you say in the video to skip a spot for the motor to sit, but I have 3 sections that are going to blank not just one like you show in the video. Do I skip more than one, am I missing ribs?

  • With your 120v drive systems for your 2.2kw spindles, do you do something to limit the output to the spindle so that the current draw doesn't exceed the 80% limitations of a 20a circuit? I have a dedicated circuit for my router and I am considering a spindle upgrade, but I am curious how the configuration matches the math.

    Yes. The VFD (Variable Frequency Drive) has a large set of parameters that can be modified. This is typically called "programming" the VFD. The parameters can be accessed using the front control panel of the VFD.

    Since the VFD is the mechanism that control the allowable current draw from the spindle, there is a parameter that assigns the motor rated current; however, it is probably better to match the rated current of the motor and "up" the circuit breaker current instead. If the current limit is set too low, then there is a possibility that the spindle will cause a current overload error on the VFD and cause the spindle to stop.

    Click the link to respond:
    With your 120v drive systems for your 2.2kw spindles, do you do something to limit the output to the spindle so that the current draw doesn't exceed the 80% limitations of a 20a circuit? I have a dedicated circuit for my router and I am considering a spindle upgrade, but I am curious how the configuration matches the math.

  • thank you for the reply. I would be really good to know the calculation. The lead screw is 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI. Please provide the calculation for determing the maximum weight motor can handle on Z-axis on book build cnc. And one more question. If I am cutting 18mm MDF with 6mm cutting bit (so 6mm pass), what can be the maximum speed rate of cutting and spindle speed of router? thank you

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    thank you for the reply. I would be really good to know the calculation. The lead screw is 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI. Please provide the calculation for determing the maximum weight motor can handle on Z-axis on book build cnc. And one more question. If I am cutting 18mm MDF with 6mm cutting bit (so 6mm pass), what can be the maximum speed rate of cutting and spindle speed of router? thank you

  • Is it possible to buy just the electronics and hardware for the bigfoot along with the plans for the timber components so that I could have them cut here in the UK and reduce the amount of material that needs to be shipped?

    The files and hardware option for our machines has been removed from the site due to the following reasons:
    Difficulty for the end use of the files and the challenges (and time/money) on our side to assist in using these files.
    The abuse of these files over the internet.
    Ultimately may reduce the sales of machines keeping us in business.
    Sadly, this is what has come out of our company attempting to be open; however, the machines sold on this site is still far lower in price than the competition for the quality that we provide as we have a great desire to engender the cottage industry to fulfill their need for low end manufacturing. My sincere apologies if this causes any inconvenience.

    Additional Information:
    NO, is not possible, I can help with the shipping cost

    Click the link to respond:
    Is it possible to buy just the electronics and hardware for the bigfoot along with the plans for the timber components so that I could have them cut here in the UK and reduce the amount of material that needs to be shipped?

  • From your assembly instructions, it appears your table top is 3/4 thick. I planned to use a thicker table at 1 1/2 thick. I realize I will need longer bolts to attach the x-axis guide rails, but will the y-z gantry adjust for a table that thick? I am building a BlackFoot.

    I apologize but the gantry legs will only be able to accommodate 3/4" thick table top (gantry sides to be specific(https://buildyourcnc.com/blackFoot48v40.aspx#prettyPhoto/28/)).This is due to the available adjust ability on the gantry legs between the v-groove bearings that ride on the top X-axis rails, and the ones that tighten on the lower rails.

    The Y-axis (width of the table) will have no problem with the table top being thicker, but the X-axis rail screws and gantry legs will not accommodate the 1"- 1/2" table top.

    Click the link to respond:
    From your assembly instructions, it appears your table top is 3/4 thick. I planned to use a thicker table at 1 1/2 thick. I realize I will need longer bolts to attach the x-axis guide rails, but will the y-z gantry adjust for a table that thick? I am building a BlackFoot.

  • Why are the instructions for assembly so difficult to follow at times? Thins seem out of sequence and the pictures do not line up to the sequence that the build foillows-especially with regards to wiring certain components
  • I purchased limit switches from you mounted them on my machine and wire them to the breakout for using pin 12 and the ground on the breakout board, after a few minutes I got a message about a limit switch trip. Am I supposed to use the extra outport on the board instead of the ground?

    Sure, the USB interface has a place for 4 axes of limit switches.

    Each axis can have two limit switches: one for the ++ (positive) end and one for the -- (negative) end. The positive end would be the limit switch at the end of the machine that, say the machine has a 4'x8' area, reaches a bit after the 8 foot mark. The negative end would be the limit switch behind the 0 foot location behind the origin. If the origin is in the middle, the negative would be at a little more than the -4 foot end and the positive would be at a bit more than the +4 foot end. Note that you can have more than one switch on each pin where the NC is connected in serial fashion and the NO is connected in parallel fashion (this can be seen on the diagram in the multiple limits switch section). The software configurations for the limits switches are under File -> Settings -> Limit.

    A typical limit switch has three connections on it. These connections consist of COM (common), NC (normally closed) and NO (normally open). The COM would generally go to GND and the NC or the NO would go to the pin. If the NC is used, then the the switch is constantly connected until the switch is pushed (engaged) then the connection from the pin to gnd is broken (open). Use the settings in software to set whether in NC or NO configuration.

    Let me know if this information was helpful (or not) by adding information to this question. Thanks.

    User response:
    Thank you very much for this helpful information. I'm still a little fuzzy on how the 6 limit switches physically connect to each other and to the USB breakout board. You've stated one switch (home) goes to positive and another switch (limit) goes to negative. Are all the GND prongs from all 6 switches connected to each other and going to GND on the breakout board, or no? And the NC prongs, how exactly are they connected to each other? And to the board? There has to be a diagram somewhere shows this visually, no? I don't know how to wire the switches in series or in parallel. I have already physically installed all the switches on the machine and ran the wires to where the board is. Now I just need to know where to plug these wires into the board. Also, taking into consideration that I'm using the Planet CNC software, the only settings I have pertaining to limit switches is "Enable/Disable" for each axis, and the actual limit for each axis. Nothing about NC or NO. Is that only in Mach3?
    Thank you.

    buildyourcnc response:
    On the USB interface, the COM on the switch connects to GND and the NC or NO connects to the input pin (i.e. x++, y--, etc.)

    Limit switch configuration is rather difficult to understand, especially with series and parallel. You can think of series as a single wire going from GND to the axis letter input terminal (i.e. X++ or X--). If the wire is broken, then the circuit is open (or the switch is engaged in a normally closed scenario). Normally closed is like an actual wire, and when engaged, the switch "opens" (breaks the wire). This is why we recommend in some systems that you can put many switches in series on a single pin. When one of the switches is engaged (breaking the connection) then the entire circuit of switches is broken and the machine stops.

    In a parallel scenario, the state of the circuit is always broken until the one of the switches is engaged and the circuit is then closed or connected. The topology looks like a ladder. All the switches connect to both sides of the ladder and the switches are like the runs of the ladder (the horizontal bars that the feet are placed while climbing). Imagine all of the switches broken in this scenario (normally open). It would be like the ladder could be split in two, but if one of the ladder runs (switches) is closed by engaging it, then that run would connect both sides of the ladder and the two sides of the ladder would have a connection.

    There is a diagram on the USB page of the various limit switch configurations. If you need more information (visual and/or otherwise), please let us know and we will immediately add that information to benefit everyone.

    Click the link to respond:
    I purchased limit switches from you mounted them on my machine and wire them to the breakout for using pin 12 and the ground on the breakout board, after a few minutes I got a message about a limit switch trip. Am I supposed to use the extra outport on the board instead of the ground?

  • I'm interested in one of your BlackToe kits. Will it cut plywood R/C airplane wing ribs accurately, including the small notches for spars and sheeting? I've heard gantry mass is too high, and causes the small notches to not be cut accurately.

    Our blackToe will work with R/C models, and can cut plywood, acrylic, foam, light sheets of aluminum. The gantry mass is not too dependent where you will see a significant accuracy loss that will not work with cutting small notches or small detailed parts, but depending on your CAD/CAM software and how accurate you specify the design it would be best if you create it in sections where you can change the endmill to a finer detailed bit when needed.
    Also dealing with our CNC machines the accuracy is in the thousandths of an inch (0.001).
    Dealing with small notches, you will most likely be better off using a small endmill/cutter, for very fine detailing (ex. a 1/8" endmill or a 1/32" endmill).

    Click the link to respond:
    I'm interested in one of your BlackToe kits. Will it cut plywood R/C airplane wing ribs accurately, including the small notches for spars and sheeting? I've heard gantry mass is too high, and causes the small notches to not be cut accurately.

  • On the whiteant. I have an old/different kit bought from this website. When attaching my x y z limit switches there is no solder mask on the main motherboard to indicate x limit y limit or z limit. I need the limit switch pinout for the main cnc board located here. https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/3D-Printer-Component-electronicsAndMotors-3d-printer-mainboard

    The 3D main board does not have any writing on the solder mask to which specific 3 pin connections are for the 3 axes. However they do show pin 1 on the board itself, now in the link that was mentioned above and here(https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/3D-Printer-Component-electronicsAndMotors-3d-printer-mainboard#prettyPhoto/0/) will have the actual axes labeled. They are a bit hard to read, but should be as showed in the picture.
    Top(closest to 12v power terminal) to bottom(closest to blue or black capacitor):
    X-min, X-max, Y-min, Y-max, Z-min, Z-max, e-stop

    Click the link to respond:
    On the whiteant. I have an old/different kit bought from this website. When attaching my x y z limit switches there is no solder mask on the main motherboard to indicate x limit y limit or z limit. I need the limit switch pinout for the main cnc board located here. https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/3D-Printer-Component-electronicsAndMotors-3d-printer-mainboard