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Question #: 3446

Question: HOW DO I DETERMINE THE AMOUNT OF SCREW WEIGTH THAT MY MOTOR CAN HANDLE

Current Solution

There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

where:
p = pitch of the screw
Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
R = radius of the lead screw


This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

Example:

Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

Lets see if we get similar results:

Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

Customer Response:
thank you so much

Additional Information:


Additional Information:


Additional Information:
how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

Additional Information:
Pls


Additional Information:
1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

Respond:

Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can lift using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can lift using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

  • I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

  • How can I determine which wires on my stepper motor bellong to A+ A- B+ or B-?

    You can use a multimeter to determine the wires of the same coil (i.e A+ and A- belong to he same coil). The wires that are connected on the same coil will have relatively low resistance. A wire from one coil to another coil with have no continuity since the two coils are not touching each other.

    Click the link to respond:
    How can I determine which wires on my stepper motor bellong to A+ A- B+ or B-?

  • how do I determine the steps per inch for the motors?

    blueChick:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackToe:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackFoot:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    greenBull:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in


    Scratch-Build / Book-Build Kit:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    Scratch built/book CNC with NEMA 34 motors and CW8060 microstep driver

    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    how do I determine the steps per inch for the motors?

  • HOW CAN I DETERMINE THE DOSE EQUIVALENT (MREM/HR, MREM/WK, MREM/YR) USING RAW DATA FROM A TLD (THERMOLUMINESCENT DOSIMETER) THAT WAS PLACED IN AN OFFICE FOR 22 DAYS?

    Assumption 1: The "raw data" of 24 mrem on the TLD is the total dose received by the TLD during the 22 days that the TLD was deployed in your office. This means that (1) any TLD reader background signal has been properly subtracted, (2) the signal accumulating in the TLD during any transport or storage time between preparation (annealing) and deployment in your office has been properly subtracted and, (3) the signal accumulating in the TLD during any transport or storage time between removal from your office and processing (reading) has been properly subtracted.

    With this assumption, the total dose rate in your office is (24 mrem)/(22 days), or 1.091 mrem per day. The reference background is given as 63 mrem per year which is (63 days)/(365.25 days per year) or 0.172 mrem per day. Thus the average net dose rate to the TLD during the 22 days was (1.091-0.172) = 0.919 mrem per day.

    Assumption 2: The net dose rate of 0.919 mrem per day in your office is attributable to the accelerator or other regulated sources under the control of your institution.

    Assumption 3: The office occupancy factor of 1/4 attributed in your question to NCRP Report 49 was misread from Table 4. The correct occupancy factor given in NCRP 49 for offices is 1.

    Assumption 4: You take 20 business days per year off for vacation and holidays. You work in your office for the remaining 240 days per year.

    Assumption 5: All of the accelerator shots occur while you are in your office.

    Assumption 6: The average net dose rate of 0.919 mrem per day determined during the 22 days of measurement continues for a year.

    Based on the data that you provided and my assumptions, your annual dose received in your office from the accelerator or other regulated sources at your institution is predicted to be (0.919 mrem per day) x (240 work days per year) = 220 mrem.

    Tom Gesell, PhD

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW CAN I DETERMINE THE DOSE EQUIVALENT (MREM/HR, MREM/WK, MREM/YR) USING RAW DATA FROM A TLD (THERMOLUMINESCENT DOSIMETER) THAT WAS PLACED IN AN OFFICE FOR 22 DAYS?

  • How to determine lead screw length needed. My Thomson 1 1:4 rails are 60 inches long roughly for the router I’m building. I know I have to have it long enough to couple up with the stepper motor of course but does it matter if it’s a little long on the other end

    It generally does not matter if it is longer at the other end as long as the lead screw provides the desired travel for that axis. The lead screw will only need to be long enough for the travel, plus any structure and lead-nut positioning.

    For example:
    - The motor that will turn the lead screw will need to be mounted at some position (generally at one end of the axis). In many cases, this positioning will be mounted where some of the lead screw will not be used (the lead nut will not be able to moved close to the coupling of the lead screw to the motor shaft). Add some of the length of the lead screw to be inserted into the coupling.

    - If the lead screw will contain bearings at either end of the travel, that portion of the mechanical assembly will need to be considered in the lead screw length.

    - The lead-nut will need to be mounted in a position on a structural member of the part that is to move. The distance from the part of the structure that will extend closest to the motor will have some distance to the position of the lead nut. This distance will need to be added to the lead screw length.

    Add these discrepancies to the length of the lead screw and the travel length and you will have the final length.

    Click the link to respond:
    How to determine lead screw length needed. My Thomson 1 1:4 rails are 60 inches long roughly for the router I’m building. I know I have to have it long enough to couple up with the stepper motor of course but does it matter if it’s a little long on the other end

  • What determines how fast the stepping motors will spin?

    The amount of voltage that is used to power the motors will generally determine the top RPM of the stepping motors. As you increase the voltage, the time constant is reduced in the process of current flowing through the coils of the motor. The faster the current can be drawn through the coils, the faster the motor will spin.

    Click the link to respond:
    What determines how fast the stepping motors will spin?

  • Do you have the data sheets for the motors so that I can use the dimensions in my model?

    You can find the datasheets to our motors be going to the the stepping motor category page https://www.buildyourcnc.com/category/nema and selecting the motor. This will bring you to the product page for the motor and all of the motor information will be found there.

    Click the link to respond:
    Do you have the data sheets for the motors so that I can use the dimensions in my model?

  • What is a clear indication of a failing/failed laser tube? I know that laser tubes eventually "wear out", but how does one determine if the tube is loosing its "oomph"? My 40W Blacktooth laser tube return goes through an ammeter, so is the ammeter reading proportional to the beam strength, or can the beam die and still draw the same amount of current?

    Dealing with glass co2 laser tubes, it is difficult to accurately tell if it is going out or loosing "oomph". The laser will loose its co2 levels, which will cause it to loose cutting strength.
    We have noticed that the laser at its "strongest" or new state fires a purplish/reddish color laser through the tube, and when it is loosing its cutting strength it turns to a faded red orange/orange color.

    Using a ammeter will only measure the current going to the tube. The PSU will not know when the tube is losing its cutting strength, so it will constantly flow the same voltage and current.


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    How many dots should come out of the laser

    Click the link to respond:
    What is a clear indication of a failing/failed laser tube? I know that laser tubes eventually "wear out", but how does one determine if the tube is loosing its "oomph"? My 40W Blacktooth laser tube return goes through an ammeter, so is the ammeter reading proportional to the beam strength, or can the beam die and still draw the same amount of current?

  • hello there, i am using servo motor for my X and Y Axis but i dont know how to calculate steps/mm for that, the lead screw i am using is have pitch of .5 mm. please helpme on this i have done everything only this point is pending.

    The formula for finding the steps per mm is found in the units itself. First, you mentioned that the motor is a servo. This needs to be clarified as a servo is different than a stepper motor. Some servos behave similar to a stepper motor, so I will continue with this in mind.

    The formula is (steps/mm):

    You need to find the steps. The stepper motor has a natural number of steps per a full revolution. This is typically 200 steps per revolution.

    The driver for the stepper motor allows you to increase the number of steps per revolution by adding a specified number of steps between each step. For instance, if you set the driver to 1/4 microstepping, then instead of having 200 steps per revolution, you would have 200 x 4 = 800 steps per revolution.

    So now we have the first part of the formula:

    Steps / mm = (200 x 4) / mm

    Lets determine the mm side of the formula:

    You mention that the pitch is 0.5 mm. Check to insure that the lead is also 0.5 mm. This could be a multiple start lead screw where the pitch is different than the turns per mm. If in this case, that the 0.5 mm is the travel for one full revolution, then you can simply plug this into the formula as:

    mm = .5 mm

    Otherwise, determine how fat the travel is for one complete revolution.

    Therefor, with what we know and the driver is set at 1/4 microstepping and the stepper motor has a natural step count per revolution at 200:

    steps / mm = (200 steps x 4) / 0.5 mm = 800 steps / 0.5 mm = 1600 steps / mm

    If your travel for one revolution is not 0.5 mm, then plug in your travel distance instead.



    Additional Information:
    i know about steps/mm calculation for stepper motor, because i am using servo motor that why i asked about that. please tell for servo motor.

    Additional Information:
    because its my first time with servo motor i have no idea about calculation of parameter with servo.

    Additional Information:
    Have you attempted to contact the manufacturer or seller of the servo? We typically respond to customers of our products on this customer service area, unless we have extensive knowledge of the subject and can answer the question efficiently.

    Click the link to respond:
    hello there, i am using servo motor for my X and Y Axis but i dont know how to calculate steps/mm for that, the lead screw i am using is have pitch of .5 mm. please helpme on this i have done everything only this point is pending.

  • How do I determine what post processor I have on my shop built CNC. There are about a million to choose from on Vcarve Pro

    You will probably have post processors like the following listed:
    Mach2/3 ATC Arcs (inch)
    Mach2/3 ATC Arcs (mm)
    Mach2/3 Arcs (inch)
    Mach2/3 Arcs (mm)
    Mach2/3-WrapX2A ATC Arcs (inch)
    Mach2/3-WrapX2A ATC Arcs (mm)
    Mach2/3-WrapY2A ATC Arcs (inch)
    Mach2/3-WrapY2A ATC Arcs (mm)

    If you have an Automatic Tool Changer, use the post processor with the ATC in the name. For most applications and if you don't have an ATC (automatic tool changer), use the Mach2/3 Arcs (inch) or (mm) post processor.

    Click the link to respond:
    How do I determine what post processor I have on my shop built CNC. There are about a million to choose from on Vcarve Pro

  • Can the Redleaf CPU be mounted in a vertical position so that motor cables run straight down?

    Absolutely. Everything in the redLeaf control box is securely fastened and can be mounted in any orientation.

    Check out this example where the Children's Museum of Houston mounted their redLeaf vertically.

    https://www.buildyourcnc.com/tutorials/Example-customer-blackfoot-houston-childrens-museum

    Click the link to respond:
    Can the Redleaf CPU be mounted in a vertical position so that motor cables run straight down?

  • I need to determine steps/inch mach3 setup information for my motors and drivers.

    blueChick:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackToe:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackFoot:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    greenBull:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in


    Scratch-Build / Book-Build Kit:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    Scratch built/book CNC with NEMA 34 motors and CW8060 microstep driver

    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    I need to determine steps/inch mach3 setup information for my motors and drivers.

  • Hi! can i order a 6 ft long 1/2'' Lead screw with the motor and the gears with it?

    1/2" lead screw can be purchased in one length up to 77 inches (6 feet, 5 inches). Motors are found under the "Motion Electronics" menu, and gears can be found under "Mechanical Components".

    Click the link to respond:
    Hi! can i order a 6 ft long 1/2'' Lead screw with the motor and the gears with it?

  • I am using Windows 10 and my Shopbot PRT 4g uses Shopbot's proprietary software https://www.shopbottools.com/support/control-software. How can I determine if the 4th axis you offer will be compatible with my machine?

    Generally, you’ll need to check what control software will need to be used with the CNC router. Our machines use industry standard electronics and control software that is nonproprietary so you can use just about any software out there with our machines.

    Specifically, what software are you planning on using?

    Additional Information:
    dear Sir,
    I'm searching for the best one,I think that I have to learn more about that in order to be able to make the right decision.

    Additional Information:
    If you are using a computer running Microsoft Windows, then I would recommend using Mach3 or Mach4. If you prefer Linux, then LinuxCNC is the best control software in my opinion.

    Click the link to respond:
    I am using Windows 10 and my Shopbot PRT 4g uses Shopbot's proprietary software https://www.shopbottools.com/support/control-software. How can I determine if the 4th axis you offer will be compatible with my machine?

  • Can I increase the travel speed of my machine with different lead screws?

    Changing your lead screws from a tight to a lose lead will definitely make your machine move faster as long as your stepper motors can handle the new torque that the lead screws will impose.

    Here is an example of a speed change from one lead screw to another:
    - Existing constants in the example: Stepper Motor steps 200, microstepping 1/8 making the total steps 200 * 8 = 1600.
    - Old lead screw: 1/2" allthread = 13 threads per inch (UNC)
    - New Lead Screw: 1/2" 5 starts, 10 TPI = 10 / 5 = 2 turns per inch

    Old lead screw would achieve a steps per inch of:
    1600 / (1 inch / 13 turns) = 20,800 steps per inch (You can also express the calculation as 1600 * 13 = 20,800 steps/inch)

    New lead screw would achieve a steps per inch of:
    1600 / (1 inch / 2 turns) = 3200 steps per inch

    You can see that the new lead screw requires far fewer steps to get to the same length of travel. If you maintained the same velocity for both examples, the new lead screw would travel the same distance 13/2 = 6.5 times faster. So, if your velocity was say 10 ipm, your new velocity would be 65 ipm. That would translate to far fewer burned edges and longer end mill life!

    Just remember, confirm that your motors will be able to handle the new lead screw. You will need to reduce the steps/inch causing the motor torque to increase quite a bit, so you should be fine.

    Click the link to respond:
    Can I increase the travel speed of my machine with different lead screws?

  • HOW DO DETERMINE THE STEPS PER INCH

    blueChick:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackToe:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackFoot:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    greenBull:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in


    Scratch-Build / Book-Build Kit:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    Scratch built/book CNC with NEMA 34 motors and CW8060 microstep driver

    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW DO DETERMINE THE STEPS PER INCH

  • What will be the amount of cable carrier that I will need for a greenBull 5x?

    To determine the length of cable carrier you will need for a single axis, measure the axis travel of your machine, divide this by 2 and add 12 inches. The radius of the curl is 2 inches.
    The amount of cable carrier needed for the CNC machines that we provide will be:

    blueChick: Total 4 Ft

    blackToe: Total 5 Ft

    blackFoot: Total 8 Ft

    greenLean: Total 8 Ft

    greenBull 5x: Total 10 Ft

    greenBull 6x: Total 11 Ft

    Click the link to respond:
    What will be the amount of cable carrier that I will need for a greenBull 5x?

  • I have an engine NEMA 34 from Y axis on my green bull that do not response, I already check connections and everything seems to be OK, how can I check that the motor it's working properly or not?

    If one or more motor is not responding, please follow the troubleshooting directions below:

    For parallel Bob only! Make sure both the parallel and USB are connected.

    Re-check wiring, and connections for continuity (no breaks in the wires) and check for correct wiring locations from driver to BoB.
    Check dip switch settings on the driver.
    Check components, by swapping the motors (ex. y-axis motor to z or x-axis driver and z or x-axis motor to y-axis driver) to check if motor functions on another driver.
    Depending on software check step low active (mach 3) or invert pulse (planet-cnc) for the axis which is not responding.
    Mach 3 - config/port & pins/motor outputs / Planet-CNC - file/settings/axes

    Click the link to respond:
    I have an engine NEMA 34 from Y axis on my green bull that do not response, I already check connections and everything seems to be OK, how can I check that the motor it's working properly or not?