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Question #: 3475

Question: How can I determine steps/inch, velocity and acceleration?

Current Solution

In the customer service live, just enter "motor tuning" and it will give you a list of all the recommended or default settings for our machines. However the acceleration and velocity for the greenBull(other machines) will be an actual determination on your trials. You will want the highest possible acceleration and velocity without the motors stalling, so you can do increments of ten to be on the safe side, if it is too slow try increments of 25.

The steps per inch is dependent on the microstepping:
Steps/Inch for the x and y
Steps = 200 motor steps per revolution x 16 microsteps = 3200 steps
Inches = sprocket number of teeth x pitch of the sprocket = 14 x .25" = 3.5 inches
steps/inch = 3200 / 3.5 = 914.28
This is really a starting point. You will then need to use the mach3 calibration function to get the perfect steps/inch value. Use as long a measurement as possible when calibrating.

Velocity:
Start with a value of 1000 ipm. Increase this value with a relatively low acceleration at about 10. You will notice at a particular velocity that it will stall. This is your stall velocity. I would take the stall velocity and reduce it by about 30% to 50% which should give you a good final safe velocity.

Acceleration:
Once the velocity is found, raise the acceleration until it start to stall at a low velocity. Reduce the acceleration by about the same percentage to stick with a safe acceleration.

The acceleration is mostly dependent on torque (current) and the top speed is dependent on the amount of voltage.

Give some tests with all of the axes running at the same time. If you notice and stalling, reduce velocities and acceleration depending on when the stall happens (top end, or acceleration curve).


X-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
Y-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
Dipswitches: 01100110
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
Z-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
Dipswitches: 01100100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

Additional Information:


Additional Information:


Additional Information:
4th axis


Additional Information:

Respond:

Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • How can I determine steps/inch, velocity and acceleration?

    In the customer service live, just enter "motor tuning" and it will give you a list of all the recommended or default settings for our machines. However the acceleration and velocity for the greenBull(other machines) will be an actual determination on your trials. You will want the highest possible acceleration and velocity without the motors stalling, so you can do increments of ten to be on the safe side, if it is too slow try increments of 25.

    The steps per inch is dependent on the microstepping:
    Steps/Inch for the x and y
    Steps = 200 motor steps per revolution x 16 microsteps = 3200 steps
    Inches = sprocket number of teeth x pitch of the sprocket = 14 x .25" = 3.5 inches
    steps/inch = 3200 / 3.5 = 914.28
    This is really a starting point. You will then need to use the mach3 calibration function to get the perfect steps/inch value. Use as long a measurement as possible when calibrating.

    Velocity:
    Start with a value of 1000 ipm. Increase this value with a relatively low acceleration at about 10. You will notice at a particular velocity that it will stall. This is your stall velocity. I would take the stall velocity and reduce it by about 30% to 50% which should give you a good final safe velocity.

    Acceleration:
    Once the velocity is found, raise the acceleration until it start to stall at a low velocity. Reduce the acceleration by about the same percentage to stick with a safe acceleration.

    The acceleration is mostly dependent on torque (current) and the top speed is dependent on the amount of voltage.

    Give some tests with all of the axes running at the same time. If you notice and stalling, reduce velocities and acceleration depending on when the stall happens (top end, or acceleration curve).


    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    4th axis


    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    How can I determine steps/inch, velocity and acceleration?

  • While motor tuning what are the recommended steps per inch, velocity, and acceleration for the GreenBull CNC?

    In the customer service live, just enter "motor tuning" and it will give you a list of all the recommended or default settings for our machines. However the acceleration and velocity for the greenBull(other machines) will be an actual determination on your trials. You will want the highest possible acceleration and velocity without the motors stalling, so you can do increments of ten to be on the safe side, if it is too slow try increments of 25.

    The steps per inch is dependent on the microstepping:
    Steps/Inch for the x and y
    Steps = 200 motor steps per revolution x 16 microsteps = 3200 steps
    Inches = sprocket number of teeth x pitch of the sprocket = 14 x .25" = 3.5 inches
    steps/inch = 3200 / 3.5 = 914.28
    This is really a starting point. You will then need to use the mach3 calibration function to get the perfect steps/inch value. Use as long a measurement as possible when calibrating.

    Velocity:
    Start with a value of 1000 ipm. Increase this value with a relatively low acceleration at about 10. You will notice at a particular velocity that it will stall. This is your stall velocity. I would take the stall velocity and reduce it by about 30% to 50% which should give you a good final safe velocity.

    Acceleration:
    Once the velocity is found, raise the acceleration until it start to stall at a low velocity. Reduce the acceleration by about the same percentage to stick with a safe acceleration.

    The acceleration is mostly dependent on torque (current) and the top speed is dependent on the amount of voltage.

    Give some tests with all of the axes running at the same time. If you notice and stalling, reduce velocities and acceleration depending on when the stall happens (top end, or acceleration curve).


    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    4th axis


    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    While motor tuning what are the recommended steps per inch, velocity, and acceleration for the GreenBull CNC?

  • Motor tuning. While motor tuning what are the recommended steps per inch, velocity, and acceleration for the BlackFoot CNC?

    These are the recommend values(default) for our blackFoot CNC machine, the acceleration and velocity can be adjusted as high as the motor can rotate without stalling! Suggested increment's will be by 10's.

    blackFoot:
    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 5.43A
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in, Velocity 400.02, Acceleration 4
    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in, Velocity 400.02, Acceleration 4
    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in, Velocity 79.98, Acceleration 5

    Additional Information:
    how can we tuning the CNC motor

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    Motor tuning. While motor tuning what are the recommended steps per inch, velocity, and acceleration for the BlackFoot CNC?

  • HOW DO I DETERMINE THE AMOUNT OF SCREW WEIGTH THAT MY MOTOR CAN HANDLE

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

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    HOW DO I DETERMINE THE AMOUNT OF SCREW WEIGTH THAT MY MOTOR CAN HANDLE

  • GreenBull 5x10 X axis shutters and spins out with acceleration at 1 in StepCon, is there anything else I can check?

    If your axis shutters and will not move unless moved by another force, that sounds like your acceleration is set too high. Lower the acceleration until it works well, then lower it a bit more to have a margin of safety.

    Users response:
    I've lowered my acceleration to 1 in the StepCon program and it still shutters when I jog it, anything else I could check?

    Buildyourcnc response:
    IF that didn't work, try swapping the X and Y drivers. That way you will pinpoint if the issue is the driver. If the proplem persists, then there may be an issue with the motor itself.

    Buildyourcnc response:
    The X and Y drivers can be easily swapped by swapping only the motor wires.

    - Remove the x-axis motor wires from the X driver.
    - Remove the Y motor wires from the Y driver.
    - Insert the X motor wires into the Y driver.
    - Insert the Y motor wires into the X driver.

    Buildyourcnc response:
    Now the Y-axis will move the gantry. Test the Gantry movement by moving the Y axis using the up and down arrow keys (mach3).

    Users response:
    Problem is now solved, I switched the X and Y at the redFly and got the same problem, so then I undid the wires going to each motor and switched them there and it I had a bad solder point in the X axis connector, thank you for the help

    Buildyourcnc response:
    You're very welcome. We will make sure to thoroughly check the solder points on the cable connectors prior to a redFly delivery.

    Click the link to respond:
    GreenBull 5x10 X axis shutters and spins out with acceleration at 1 in StepCon, is there anything else I can check?

  • How can I determine which wires on my stepper motor bellong to A+ A- B+ or B-?

    You can use a multimeter to determine the wires of the same coil (i.e A+ and A- belong to he same coil). The wires that are connected on the same coil will have relatively low resistance. A wire from one coil to another coil with have no continuity since the two coils are not touching each other.

    Click the link to respond:
    How can I determine which wires on my stepper motor bellong to A+ A- B+ or B-?

  • What determines how fast the stepping motors will spin?

    The amount of voltage that is used to power the motors will generally determine the top RPM of the stepping motors. As you increase the voltage, the time constant is reduced in the process of current flowing through the coils of the motor. The faster the current can be drawn through the coils, the faster the motor will spin.

    Click the link to respond:
    What determines how fast the stepping motors will spin?

  • how do I determine the steps per inch for the motors?

    blueChick:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackToe:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackFoot:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    greenBull:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in


    Scratch-Build / Book-Build Kit:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    Scratch built/book CNC with NEMA 34 motors and CW8060 microstep driver

    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    how do I determine the steps per inch for the motors?

  • What is the acceleration limited to with the laser tube vertical?

    With our new Laser/Spindle Combo Head for our greenBull, we kept the acceleration the same and had no issues at all with the tube (regarding chipping breaking etc.). So there is no specific limit to the machine (take into affect the weight of your gantry and the overall output of your motors), but here is the setup we have now:
    (with a custom greenBull gantry (4' x 8'))
    X-axis
    SPI: 910.069
    Vel: 400.02
    Acc: 12
    Y-Axis
    SPI: 911.023
    Vel: 400.02
    Acc: 18
    Z-Axis
    SPI: 1632.653
    Vel: 79.98
    Acc: 5

    Click the link to respond:
    What is the acceleration limited to with the laser tube vertical?

  • How do I determine what CAM program I should use?

    There are several specifications related to CAM software that you will need to consider.

    1. The CAM software will need to be able to offer the features that match that of the machine you select to perform the fabrication. Some of these machines include, standard 3 axis vertical CNC milling machine, turning machine, and 4 or 5 axis CNC machine.

    2. The CAM software will need to contain the features that you feel are necessary for how you will apply the machine. For example, are you making signs? Are you milling parts for a machine? There is a wide array of CAM software that will work well for one application and not another.

    3. The CAM software will need to work well with your workflow and processes, and have the user interface that you prefer.

    Click the link to respond:
    How do I determine what CAM program I should use?

  • HOW DO DETERMINE THE STEPS PER INCH

    blueChick:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackToe:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackFoot:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    greenBull:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in


    Scratch-Build / Book-Build Kit:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    Scratch built/book CNC with NEMA 34 motors and CW8060 microstep driver

    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW DO DETERMINE THE STEPS PER INCH

  • I need to determine steps/inch mach3 setup information for my motors and drivers.

    blueChick:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackToe:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackFoot:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    greenBull:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in


    Scratch-Build / Book-Build Kit:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    Scratch built/book CNC with NEMA 34 motors and CW8060 microstep driver

    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    I need to determine steps/inch mach3 setup information for my motors and drivers.

  • What is the best way to determine speeds and feeds for machine and bit longevity?

    The speeds and feeds are generally based on the amount of flutes that are being used per pass and how hot the end mill is getting when milling.  You want to use as much of the flutes as possible on single cuts.  Make the deepest cuts you can to increase the life of the tool.  For instance, if a tool that is 1 inch in cut length and the depth per pass is 1/4", then only that 1/4" is being used for the cutting.  The 1/4" tip of that tool will wear faster.  
    Make sure the feedrate is as fast as possible without a cost to the edge finish.  This will keep the end mill cool since there will be minimal friction as you are always cutting into fresh cooler material.  
    Use the end mill manufacturer's chip load for the tool to determine the starting feed rate.

    Feedrate (IPM - Inches/Min) = Spindle RPM x # of Flutes x Chip Load
    See each end mill for the chip load value.

    If your machine cannot achieve these feed rates, reduce the spindle RPM using this formula:
    Speed (RPM) = Feed Rate (IPM) / (# of Flutes x Chip Load)

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    What is the best way to determine speeds and feeds for machine and bit longevity?

  • I purchased the large gantry system with USB control. I have built the CNC and it is working fine. Now fine tuning the motors. On the X-axis I have the Velocity set at 60 (inches), Acceleration at 1.4, the Step Pulse 1-5us and Dir Pulse set at 0. Do I need to adjust the pulses?

    The steps per unit is automatically determined in the calibration of the axis by clicking on the "set steps per unit" button above the reset button on the settings tab. Initially set the velocity and acceleration to a low setting, like 100 and 10 respectively, so that the axis does not stall during this operation. Once calibrated, the steps per unit will be set to the correct value and the velocity and acceleration can be increased. I have a video explaning the tuning of the motors on this page:
    https://www.buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-electronic-component-breakout-Mach4-mach3-USB-ethernet-Board

    The name of the video is Test and Tune the motors.

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    I purchased the large gantry system with USB control. I have built the CNC and it is working fine. Now fine tuning the motors. On the X-axis I have the Velocity set at 60 (inches), Acceleration at 1.4, the Step Pulse 1-5us and Dir Pulse set at 0. Do I need to adjust the pulses?

  • Need to stop abrupt accelerations, on direction changes. Puts everything out of alignment. 4x8 Blackfoot

    The acceleration setting in Mach3 or other control software you may be using should be relatively low. For the blackFoot, we don't exceed a value of 20 for acceleration. To modify the acceleration in Mach3, go to the motor tuning option under the config menu.

    Make sure to use exact stop rather than constant velovity if the velocity is set high so the corners will not curve. Having a high velocity and low acceleration, constant velocity will cause the corners to become rounded. With exact stop, the outside corners will be as intended and inside corners will be the diameter of the end mill.

    Additional Information:
    I was unable to add that I am using PlanetCNC. My understanding is the USB breakout board is only planetcnc compatible.
    I have changed accelerations to a minimum (was only ever 10, now at 1) and it still "jumps" fairly randomly.
    I have lowered speeds to absurdly low. To slow without burning out bits if I was actually cutting. Still Y axis particularly jumps from speed of 300 to 2000 or more.
    I am using mm. I set the bit feedrate to 30mm/sec.
    The sudden jumps only ever seem to happen at the start of a cutting program. 5-10min in and it settles. With little or now sudden accelerations.
    I am not using constant velocity.
    Any guidance appreciated.

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    Need to stop abrupt accelerations, on direction changes. Puts everything out of alignment. 4x8 Blackfoot

  • WHAT CAUSES RINGING IN YOUR EAR AND HOW CAN YOU STOP IT?

    Tinnitus . Learn to love it. No really you should see a doctor. Make sure. White noise will help you sleep when it gets loud.

    Additional Information:
    I learned, too late, that if a sudden loud event causes tinnitus, see an audiologist IMMEDIATELY. They can do something about it if addressed within a day or so.

    Wear hearing protection...always. Loud noises trigger my tinnitus, and headphones and ear plugs (when out & about or at the movies, subway, etc) help tremendously. Mine are rated 33dB.

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    WHAT CAUSES RINGING IN YOUR EAR AND HOW CAN YOU STOP IT?

  • on the laser cutter and engraver, can it do steel and how thick

    The laser engraver can cut steel to a depth of 1/4" (one quarter inch).

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    However, the CO2 laser cutters at 40 watts cannot cut steel.

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    on the laser cutter and engraver, can it do steel and how thick

  • HOW CAN I DETERMINE THE DOSE EQUIVALENT (MREM/HR, MREM/WK, MREM/YR) USING RAW DATA FROM A TLD (THERMOLUMINESCENT DOSIMETER) THAT WAS PLACED IN AN OFFICE FOR 22 DAYS?

    Assumption 1: The "raw data" of 24 mrem on the TLD is the total dose received by the TLD during the 22 days that the TLD was deployed in your office. This means that (1) any TLD reader background signal has been properly subtracted, (2) the signal accumulating in the TLD during any transport or storage time between preparation (annealing) and deployment in your office has been properly subtracted and, (3) the signal accumulating in the TLD during any transport or storage time between removal from your office and processing (reading) has been properly subtracted.

    With this assumption, the total dose rate in your office is (24 mrem)/(22 days), or 1.091 mrem per day. The reference background is given as 63 mrem per year which is (63 days)/(365.25 days per year) or 0.172 mrem per day. Thus the average net dose rate to the TLD during the 22 days was (1.091-0.172) = 0.919 mrem per day.

    Assumption 2: The net dose rate of 0.919 mrem per day in your office is attributable to the accelerator or other regulated sources under the control of your institution.

    Assumption 3: The office occupancy factor of 1/4 attributed in your question to NCRP Report 49 was misread from Table 4. The correct occupancy factor given in NCRP 49 for offices is 1.

    Assumption 4: You take 20 business days per year off for vacation and holidays. You work in your office for the remaining 240 days per year.

    Assumption 5: All of the accelerator shots occur while you are in your office.

    Assumption 6: The average net dose rate of 0.919 mrem per day determined during the 22 days of measurement continues for a year.

    Based on the data that you provided and my assumptions, your annual dose received in your office from the accelerator or other regulated sources at your institution is predicted to be (0.919 mrem per day) x (240 work days per year) = 220 mrem.

    Tom Gesell, PhD

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    HOW CAN I DETERMINE THE DOSE EQUIVALENT (MREM/HR, MREM/WK, MREM/YR) USING RAW DATA FROM A TLD (THERMOLUMINESCENT DOSIMETER) THAT WAS PLACED IN AN OFFICE FOR 22 DAYS?

  • I am using Windows 10 and my Shopbot PRT 4g uses Shopbot's proprietary software https://www.shopbottools.com/support/control-software. How can I determine if the 4th axis you offer will be compatible with my machine?

    Generally, you’ll need to check what control software will need to be used with the CNC router. Our machines use industry standard electronics and control software that is nonproprietary so you can use just about any software out there with our machines.

    Specifically, what software are you planning on using?

    Additional Information:
    dear Sir,
    I'm searching for the best one,I think that I have to learn more about that in order to be able to make the right decision.

    Additional Information:
    If you are using a computer running Microsoft Windows, then I would recommend using Mach3 or Mach4. If you prefer Linux, then LinuxCNC is the best control software in my opinion.

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    I am using Windows 10 and my Shopbot PRT 4g uses Shopbot's proprietary software https://www.shopbottools.com/support/control-software. How can I determine if the 4th axis you offer will be compatible with my machine?