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Question #: 942

Question: how do I determine the steps per inch for the motors?

Current Solution

blueChick:

X-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

Y-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

Z-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 10101100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

blackToe:

X-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

Y-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

Z-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 10101100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

blackFoot:

X-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

Y-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 11001100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

Z-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 10101100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

greenBull:

X-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

Y-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
Dipswitches: 01100110
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

Z-axis
“CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
Dipswitches: 01100100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in


Scratch-Build / Book-Build Kit:

X-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 10101100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

Y-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 10101100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

Z-axis
“CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
Dipswitches: 10101100
Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

Additional Information:


Additional Information:
Scratch built/book CNC with NEMA 34 motors and CW8060 microstep driver

Additional Information:

Respond:

Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • HOW DO DETERMINE THE STEPS PER INCH

    blueChick:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackToe:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackFoot:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    greenBull:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in


    Scratch-Build / Book-Build Kit:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    Scratch built/book CNC with NEMA 34 motors and CW8060 microstep driver

    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW DO DETERMINE THE STEPS PER INCH

  • WHAT IS THE FORMULA TO DETERMINE STEPS PER INCH OR RESOLUTION FOR EACH AXIS?

    The formula and calculation is a starting point to get into the area of steps per inch. You will then need to use the mach3 calibration utility to get the exact steps per inch.

    Formula:
    step per inch = (motor steps * microstepping) / (travel at one turn of the motor in inches)
    if microstepping is set at 16 (1/16 on the driver) then and you are using a sprocket and chain with a pitch of .25 inches and 12 teeth on the drive sprocket
    = (200 * 16) / (12 * .25)
    = 3200 / 3
    = 1066.666 steps per inch

    For lead screw that has a travel of .5 inches at one turn like the 5 start 1/2 inch lead screw and using 4 microsteps per step (1/4):
    = (200 * 4) / (.5)
    = 800 / .5
    = 1600 steps per inch

    Remember to use the mach3 calibration wizard and double check the driver microstep setting.

    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    WHAT IS THE FORMULA TO DETERMINE STEPS PER INCH OR RESOLUTION FOR EACH AXIS?

  • I need to determine steps/inch mach3 setup information for my motors and drivers.

    blueChick:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackToe:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackFoot:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    greenBull:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in


    Scratch-Build / Book-Build Kit:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    Scratch built/book CNC with NEMA 34 motors and CW8060 microstep driver

    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    I need to determine steps/inch mach3 setup information for my motors and drivers.

  • What determines how fast the stepping motors will spin?

    The amount of voltage that is used to power the motors will generally determine the top RPM of the stepping motors. As you increase the voltage, the time constant is reduced in the process of current flowing through the coils of the motor. The faster the current can be drawn through the coils, the faster the motor will spin.

    Click the link to respond:
    What determines how fast the stepping motors will spin?

  • HOW CAN I DETERMINE STEPS/INCH, VELOCITY AND ACCELERATION?

    In the customer service live, just enter "motor tuning" and it will give you a list of all the recommended or default settings for our machines. However the acceleration and velocity for the greenBull(other machines) will be an actual determination on your trials. You will want the highest possible acceleration and velocity without the motors stalling, so you can do increments of ten to be on the safe side, if it is too slow try increments of 25.

    The steps per inch is dependent on the microstepping:
    Steps/Inch for the x and y
    Steps = 200 motor steps per revolution x 16 microsteps = 3200 steps
    Inches = sprocket number of teeth x pitch of the sprocket = 14 x .25" = 3.5 inches
    steps/inch = 3200 / 3.5 = 914.28
    This is really a starting point. You will then need to use the mach3 calibration function to get the perfect steps/inch value. Use as long a measurement as possible when calibrating.

    Velocity:
    Start with a value of 1000 ipm. Increase this value with a relatively low acceleration at about 10. You will notice at a particular velocity that it will stall. This is your stall velocity. I would take the stall velocity and reduce it by about 30% to 50% which should give you a good final safe velocity.

    Acceleration:
    Once the velocity is found, raise the acceleration until it start to stall at a low velocity. Reduce the acceleration by about the same percentage to stick with a safe acceleration.

    The acceleration is mostly dependent on torque (current) and the top speed is dependent on the amount of voltage.

    Give some tests with all of the axes running at the same time. If you notice and stalling, reduce velocities and acceleration depending on when the stall happens (top end, or acceleration curve).


    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    4th axis

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW CAN I DETERMINE STEPS/INCH, VELOCITY AND ACCELERATION?

  • How can I determine steps/inch, velocity and acceleration?

    In the customer service live, just enter "motor tuning" and it will give you a list of all the recommended or default settings for our machines. However the acceleration and velocity for the greenBull(other machines) will be an actual determination on your trials. You will want the highest possible acceleration and velocity without the motors stalling, so you can do increments of ten to be on the safe side, if it is too slow try increments of 25.

    The steps per inch is dependent on the microstepping:
    Steps/Inch for the x and y
    Steps = 200 motor steps per revolution x 16 microsteps = 3200 steps
    Inches = sprocket number of teeth x pitch of the sprocket = 14 x .25" = 3.5 inches
    steps/inch = 3200 / 3.5 = 914.28
    This is really a starting point. You will then need to use the mach3 calibration function to get the perfect steps/inch value. Use as long a measurement as possible when calibrating.

    Velocity:
    Start with a value of 1000 ipm. Increase this value with a relatively low acceleration at about 10. You will notice at a particular velocity that it will stall. This is your stall velocity. I would take the stall velocity and reduce it by about 30% to 50% which should give you a good final safe velocity.

    Acceleration:
    Once the velocity is found, raise the acceleration until it start to stall at a low velocity. Reduce the acceleration by about the same percentage to stick with a safe acceleration.

    The acceleration is mostly dependent on torque (current) and the top speed is dependent on the amount of voltage.

    Give some tests with all of the axes running at the same time. If you notice and stalling, reduce velocities and acceleration depending on when the stall happens (top end, or acceleration curve).


    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    4th axis

    Click the link to respond:
    How can I determine steps/inch, velocity and acceleration?

  • stepper motor runs smooth then rough for a moment then smooth, etc. Does this at all steps, and connected motors.

    This sounds like it could be a loose wire, or poor connection with the motor wires. Make sure all wires that are to be connected to each other are soldered and use a lineman's splice when putting the wires together. Also, make sure that the wires going into the driver is securely fastened.

    If this is an issue where the motors have run well for a long time then just started to show this performance issue, then make sure that there are no wire ties or other binding method that is chaffing the wires. This would make the motors run oddly at certain travel positions where the chafing has caused a short with the wires.

    If this is an issue where you don't have the motor plugged in at all and are just trying to turn it by hand and this phenomenon is occuring, then make sure all of the wires are not touching each other. When wires are touching each other and you are trying to spin the shaft by hand, the motor will feed current back into the motor making it difficult to turn.

    Click the link to respond:
    stepper motor runs smooth then rough for a moment then smooth, etc. Does this at all steps, and connected motors.

  • How do I configure my control program (i.e. Mach3, EMC2, etc.) for lead screw steps per inch?

    You will first need to derive the number of turns per inch that your lead screw produces. If there is only a single start (typical all thread screws), then the turns per inch is the same as TPI (threads per inch). If there is multiple starts, then the number of starts is divided by the TPI to determine the turns per inch. For example, 10 TPI with 5 starts is 10 / 5 = 2 turns per inch. Now that we know this, we can get the number of steps per inch as described in the previous question: take the number of steps per revolution that the motor will output. This will be the number of full steps that you motor produces (typically 200, or 1.8 degrees per step) multiplied by the microstepping per step to which the driver is configured. Simply multiple the number of turns per inch and the number of steps per revolution and you will get the steps per inch. Ok, lets see the formula:

    200 steps * 16 microsteps * 2 turns per inch = 6400 steps per inch


    Additional Information:
    14798


    Additional Information:
    hallo i have cnc with ball screw 2.5mm of pith..n driver stepping 1/16 how to setup step value

    Additional Information:
    i have ball screw with 2.5 mm of pith n 1 start motor 200 step 1/16 driver stepping

    Click the link to respond:
    How do I configure my control program (i.e. Mach3, EMC2, etc.) for lead screw steps per inch?

  • HOW MANY STEPS PER INCH DO I SET IN MOTOR TUNING?

    blueChick:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackToe:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    blackFoot:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/16 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 11001100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1422.22 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    greenBull:

    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in


    Scratch-Build / Book-Build Kit:

    X-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Y-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Z-axis
    “CW230 (3.0A) Driver”
    Set to 1/4 Microstep, 2.7A
    Dipswitches: 10101100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    Scratch built/book CNC with NEMA 34 motors and CW8060 microstep driver

    Additional Information:

    Click the link to respond:
    HOW MANY STEPS PER INCH DO I SET IN MOTOR TUNING?

  • How do I wire two stepper motors for one axis?

    Yes, you can use 2 motors in the same axis output, however you will still need a driver for that motor! Also depending on the orientation on which you mount the motor you might have to invert the direction of the motor, and that will be simple by swapping the A+,A-, to the B+,B- locations and vice versa, from the driver to the motor wiring.

    Also you can run a slave motor using another axis on the board, and setting it up in the Planet-CNC settings.

    Planet-CNC/File/Settings/Axes, here you will enter 3 in the Number of Axes location, and then change the Function of the Axis 4 to Slave 1. There you will have the 4th axis or A-axis be a slave for the x-axis.
    Slave 1 - X-Axis
    Slave 2 - Y-Axis
    Slave 3 - A-Axis
    Slave 4 - B-Axis
    Etc...

    Click the link to respond:
    How do I wire two stepper motors for one axis?

  • For tuning the motors in mach 3 should I be running a gcode or is keyboard jogging enough to determine the stall rates

    It seems to be getting some kind of interference or a short within the wiring or communication, try jogging the motors in the software without anything wired to the board. Then add one motor at a time to see if there is a short within your wiring or a faulty driver/motor.
    If the USB breakout board continues to move the x-axis with no motors or driver wired to it, please email customerservice@buildyourcnc.com for a replacement or further troubleshooting.

    Click the link to respond:
    For tuning the motors in mach 3 should I be running a gcode or is keyboard jogging enough to determine the stall rates

  • For tuning the motors in mach 3 should I be running a gcode or is keyboard jogging enough to determine the stall rates

    Keyboard jogging will give you a good start at motor tuning since going from a stop to rapid travel speed is the quickest the machine will be required to accelerate. However, best practice is to also run test files and actually cut the type of materials you expect to deal with to test machine performance under load and make any fine adjustments needed for maximum performance.

    Click the link to respond:
    For tuning the motors in mach 3 should I be running a gcode or is keyboard jogging enough to determine the stall rates

  • How do I configure my control program (i.e. Mach3, EMC2, etc.) for roller chain or timing belt steps per inch?

    First, you will need to know the pitch of the roller chain, or timing belt. For example, #25 roller chain is .25" (1/4") pitch and #40 roller chain is .5" (1/2") pitch. Timing belts are similar and you will need to search the specifications of your particular drive pulley pitch. Take this pitch and multiply this with the number of teeth on the drive pulley/sprocket. This will give you the number of inches around the pulley/sprocket. Now, take the number of steps per revolution that the motor will output. This will be the number of full steps that you motor produces (typically 200, or 1.8 degrees per step) multiplied by the microstepping per step to which the driver is configured. Divide this number by the inches that was calculated from the drive pulley/sprocket. Here is an example: If the motor produces 200 steps per revolution and I am driving it at 1/16 microstepping and my sprocket pitch is .25" with 9 teeth, my formula would be:

    (200 steps * 16 microsteps) / (.25 inches * 9 teeth) = 3200
    steps per revolution / 2.25 inches = 1422.222 steps per inch

    Click the link to respond:
    How do I configure my control program (i.e. Mach3, EMC2, etc.) for roller chain or timing belt steps per inch?

  • HOW DO I DETERMINE THE AMOUNT OF SCREW WEIGTH THAT MY MOTOR CAN HANDLE

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

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    HOW DO I DETERMINE THE AMOUNT OF SCREW WEIGTH THAT MY MOTOR CAN HANDLE

  • how do you calibrate steps per inch using Mach3 and a 1/2x13 lead screw

    You will first need to derive the number of turns per inch that your lead screw produces. If there is only a single start (typical all thread screws), then the turns per inch is the same as TPI (threads per inch). If there is multiple starts, then the number of starts is divided by the TPI to determine the turns per inch. For example, 10 TPI with 5 starts is 10 / 5 = 2 turns per inch. Now that we know this, we can get the number of steps per inch as described in the previous question: take the number of steps per revolution that the motor will output. This will be the number of full steps that you motor produces (typically 200, or 1.8 degrees per step) multiplied by the microstepping per step to which the driver is configured. Simply multiple the number of turns per inch and the number of steps per revolution and you will get the steps per inch. Ok, lets see the formula:

    200 steps * 16 microsteps * 2 turns per inch = 6400 steps per inch


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    hallo i have cnc with ball screw 2.5mm of pith..n driver stepping 1/16 how to setup step value

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    i have ball screw with 2.5 mm of pith n 1 start motor 200 step 1/16 driver stepping

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  • How do I order the 10 TPI 5-start 2-turns-per-inch screws?, just shows $ per inch with no option for lenght.

    When purchasing the 1/2" 5 start lead screw, the length is based on the quantity. Specify the total length you will need and we will email you (if you don't contact us first) to determine the cut lengths.

    For example, if you desire 36 inches of lead screw for the X axis and 12 inches of lead screw for the Y axis, just purchase 48 inches of lead screw and tell us you need this lead screw cut so you have two lengths at 36 inches and 12 inches.

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    How do I order the 10 TPI 5-start 2-turns-per-inch screws?, just shows $ per inch with no option for lenght.

  • While motor tuning what are the recommended steps per inch, velocity, and acceleration for the GreenBull CNC?

    In the customer service live, just enter "motor tuning" and it will give you a list of all the recommended or default settings for our machines. However the acceleration and velocity for the greenBull(other machines) will be an actual determination on your trials. You will want the highest possible acceleration and velocity without the motors stalling, so you can do increments of ten to be on the safe side, if it is too slow try increments of 25.

    The steps per inch is dependent on the microstepping:
    Steps/Inch for the x and y
    Steps = 200 motor steps per revolution x 16 microsteps = 3200 steps
    Inches = sprocket number of teeth x pitch of the sprocket = 14 x .25" = 3.5 inches
    steps/inch = 3200 / 3.5 = 914.28
    This is really a starting point. You will then need to use the mach3 calibration function to get the perfect steps/inch value. Use as long a measurement as possible when calibrating.

    Velocity:
    Start with a value of 1000 ipm. Increase this value with a relatively low acceleration at about 10. You will notice at a particular velocity that it will stall. This is your stall velocity. I would take the stall velocity and reduce it by about 30% to 50% which should give you a good final safe velocity.

    Acceleration:
    Once the velocity is found, raise the acceleration until it start to stall at a low velocity. Reduce the acceleration by about the same percentage to stick with a safe acceleration.

    The acceleration is mostly dependent on torque (current) and the top speed is dependent on the amount of voltage.

    Give some tests with all of the axes running at the same time. If you notice and stalling, reduce velocities and acceleration depending on when the stall happens (top end, or acceleration curve).


    X-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110 (“0”=down, “1”=up)
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Y-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/16 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100110
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 914.29 steps/in
    Z-axis
    “CW8060 (6.0A) Driver”
    Set to 5.43A, 1/4 Microstep
    Dipswitches: 01100100
    Mach3 Motor Tuning: 1600 steps/in

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    While motor tuning what are the recommended steps per inch, velocity, and acceleration for the GreenBull CNC?

  • Hi please could you tell me how to work out the size required for the stepper motors ? which kit to get thanks

    The size of motors required for your machine build will depend on many characteristics of the machine.

    If the machine uses a gantry (rather than moving the table bed) and the weight of the gantry (specifically with inertia),

    The mechanics used with the axes, lead screw, roller chain, timing belt or rack and pinion. Generally you will need less torque if using lead screw due to the mechanical advantage, but friction is important to consider.

    If you are building a 4'x8' or larger machine, it would be best to use: https://buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-3axis-heavy-gantry-elcombo

    Otherwise: this electronics: https://buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-3axis-425-elcombo should be fine for most configurations.

    If you feel that you need extra torque on the z-axis (the z-axis will use a very heavy spindle, for instance), use this electronics: https://buildyourcnc.com/item/electronicsAndMotors-3axis-651-elcombo

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    Hi please could you tell me how to work out the size required for the stepper motors ? which kit to get thanks

  • stepper motor steps per inch formula

    The formula and calculation is a starting point to get into the area of steps per inch. You will then need to use the mach3 calibration utility to get the exact steps per inch.

    Formula:
    step per inch = (motor steps * microstepping) / (travel at one turn of the motor in inches)
    if microstepping is set at 16 (1/16 on the driver) then and you are using a sprocket and chain with a pitch of .25 inches and 12 teeth on the drive sprocket
    = (200 * 16) / (12 * .25)
    = 3200 / 3
    = 1066.666 steps per inch

    For lead screw that has a travel of .5 inches at one turn like the 5 start 1/2 inch lead screw and using 4 microsteps per step (1/4):
    = (200 * 4) / (.5)
    = 800 / .5
    = 1600 steps per inch

    Remember to use the mach3 calibration wizard and double check the driver microstep setting.

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