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Question #: 14080

Question: I ordered 96 inches of the 1/2 inch 10 tpi drive screw. I need it in 3 pieces. 53 inches, 30 inches, and 13 inches. Please let me know if that can happen. Thankyou

Current Solution

Yes. We will make sure the lead screw is cut to those dimensions. 53/30/13

Respond:

Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

  • I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can lift using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can lift using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

  • How to determine lead screw length needed. My Thomson 1 1:4 rails are 60 inches long roughly for the router I’m building. I know I have to have it long enough to couple up with the stepper motor of course but does it matter if it’s a little long on the other end

    It generally does not matter if it is longer at the other end as long as the lead screw provides the desired travel for that axis. The lead screw will only need to be long enough for the travel, plus any structure and lead-nut positioning.

    For example:
    - The motor that will turn the lead screw will need to be mounted at some position (generally at one end of the axis). In many cases, this positioning will be mounted where some of the lead screw will not be used (the lead nut will not be able to moved close to the coupling of the lead screw to the motor shaft). Add some of the length of the lead screw to be inserted into the coupling.

    - If the lead screw will contain bearings at either end of the travel, that portion of the mechanical assembly will need to be considered in the lead screw length.

    - The lead-nut will need to be mounted in a position on a structural member of the part that is to move. The distance from the part of the structure that will extend closest to the motor will have some distance to the position of the lead nut. This distance will need to be added to the lead screw length.

    Add these discrepancies to the length of the lead screw and the travel length and you will have the final length.

    Click the link to respond:
    How to determine lead screw length needed. My Thomson 1 1:4 rails are 60 inches long roughly for the router I’m building. I know I have to have it long enough to couple up with the stepper motor of course but does it matter if it’s a little long on the other end

  • What are the toggle switch settings on the stepper motor drivers for the .5 in. lead screw 10 tpi 2 turns per inch? Thankyou!

    On the top of the stepper motor drivers is a grid with the appropriate toggle switch positions for the lead screw being used. If it is 2 turns per inch, the proper toggle switch positions would be 01101110. Try this and see if it works.

    Click the link to respond:
    What are the toggle switch settings on the stepper motor drivers for the .5 in. lead screw 10 tpi 2 turns per inch? Thankyou!

  • I just ordered a 1/2" lead screw and bearings, etc. But I don't see any 1/2" shim washers for those bearings. If you have any, please toss 8 of them in the shipment and I'll gladly reimburse you.

    We will provide shim washers as a part of machine assemblies, but when purchasing lead screw and bearings, the shim washers must be purchased as well. Please give us a call and we can send them out.

    Click the link to respond:
    I just ordered a 1/2" lead screw and bearings, etc. But I don't see any 1/2" shim washers for those bearings. If you have any, please toss 8 of them in the shipment and I'll gladly reimburse you.

  • What is travel speed of the blackfoot machine ?? I read in a forum somewhere that it's around 100inches/minute. Is that accurate ??

    The jog speed of the blackToe is 1000 - 1500 ipm (inches per minute). I generally set this to about 700 ipm just to be safe and 700 ipm is plenty fast for most scenarios. The cutting speed will depend on the tool (end mill) that you will use for the application, the material being used and whether a spindle or router is used. In a scenario that a spindle is used and cutting relatively hard plywood at 3/4" full depth using an Onsrud 1/4" diameter compression end mill, you can cut at around 100 - 300 ipm. Using a router would be only half the speed and cutting depth due to the poor torque.

    Click the link to respond:
    What is travel speed of the blackfoot machine ?? I read in a forum somewhere that it's around 100inches/minute. Is that accurate ??

  • Regarding 1/2" 5 start and 10 TPI ACME precision lead screw, what the maximum length you can ship within USA? I'm looking for something like 100" and I could use a 1" screw if available. Please include estimated price. Thanks.

    The maximum length we can ship is a total of 78" inches. However we can send your required length in portions. Please refer to adding the total items you require to your cart to get a visualized amount and shipping cost.

    Click the link to respond:
    Regarding 1/2" 5 start and 10 TPI ACME precision lead screw, what the maximum length you can ship within USA? I'm looking for something like 100" and I could use a 1" screw if available. Please include estimated price. Thanks.

  • Mini Breadboard 17x10 with a self adhesive on the back. Blue color. Measures 1.365 inches x 1.8 inches with a thickness of .375 inches. Don't see the page to order.

    That product page for the mini breadboards can be found on our sister site: newbiehack.com. Here is the link: https://www.newbiehack.com/categories/newbiehack-prototyping-breadboard-mini-breadboard-17x100-blue

    Additional Information:
    I'm curious, how did you get to the buildyourcnc.com site for that product? Was it a google search. I would like to know so I can modify the description so the product can be found more successfully. Thanks.

    Additional Information:
    Was looking for answers on how to invert signals for opposing steppers Seen your solutions bought the hex inverter and breakout board from newbiehack

    Click the link to respond:
    Mini Breadboard 17x10 with a self adhesive on the back. Blue color. Measures 1.365 inches x 1.8 inches with a thickness of .375 inches. Don't see the page to order.

  • BlackToe g-code or rather the DXF-file(s), but I can't find that option on the site anymore. Also, is it possible to convert all measurements to mm instead of inches? (Since I live in Sweden). Thank you!

    The files and hardware option for our machines has been removed from the site due to the following reasons:
    Difficulty for the end use of the files and the challenges (and time/money) on our side to assist in using these files.
    The abuse of these files over the internet.
    Ultimately may reduce the sales of machines keeping us in business.
    Sadly, this is what has come out of our company attempting to be open; however, the machines sold on this site is still far lower in price than the competition for the quality that we provide as we have a great desire to engender the cottage industry to fulfill their need for low end manufacturing. My sincere apologies if this causes any inconvenience.

    Additional Information:
    NO, is not possible, I can help with the shipping cost

    Click the link to respond:
    BlackToe g-code or rather the DXF-file(s), but I can't find that option on the site anymore. Also, is it possible to convert all measurements to mm instead of inches? (Since I live in Sweden). Thank you!

  • hi. i need a 3/8 screw of 78 inches how much does it cost and do you have it?

    Our 3/8" lead screws are available at a maximum length of 72". A screw at that diameter is is not the best solution at long lengths for machines that will spin that axis quickly since there will be screw whipping.

    Click the link to respond:
    hi. i need a 3/8 screw of 78 inches how much does it cost and do you have it?

  • On the Book Build: I'm changing the 13TPI 1/2" lead screw with the 1/2" 10 TPI Acme screw with the anti backlash nut. This is for the Z axis only. What should I know about installing it and what are the numbers I need to plug into the motor tuning area.

    The settings that will have to be change will be your steps per inch in motor tuning (mach 3), or settings/axes(planetCNC). But we do not have the actual numbers/specs that will fit your 10 TPI 5 start lead screw, here is a tutorial video which explains how to get the exact numbers you need! (

    ).
    Here is a default setting that you might be able to tune and adjust accordingly: 1600 steps, accel 400.02, velocity 5.

    Click the link to respond:
    On the Book Build: I'm changing the 13TPI 1/2" lead screw with the 1/2" 10 TPI Acme screw with the anti backlash nut. This is for the Z axis only. What should I know about installing it and what are the numbers I need to plug into the motor tuning area.

  • I am building your "Green Bull' 6 foot wide kit and I am at the stage of attaching the motor and drive chain. I would like to know if you have an modification kit available to put the 1/2" ACME screw on the Y-axis?

    Currently we do not have that modification kit, our set up is fixed for our greenBull only modification kit we have for this model is the long z-axis kit(Designed for Foam cutting).

    Click the link to respond:
    I am building your "Green Bull' 6 foot wide kit and I am at the stage of attaching the motor and drive chain. I would like to know if you have an modification kit available to put the 1/2" ACME screw on the Y-axis?

  • Does "Additional Length" for the Lead Screw mean Additional Length in inches? So for the 4' x-axis I have to choose Additional Length=52?

    When you add a specific length to your cart, the additional length will be in inches.
    So you will need to add the total length which will be 98" in total!

    If this is for the scratch build kit (book CNC) the total length (98") of lead screw you will need for this machine is the three axes added together:

    X-axis: 52"
    Y-axis: 32"
    Z-axis: 14"

    You will have to specify the dimensions you require by sending a email (with your order details) or call to: customerservice@buildyourcnc.com or 281-815-7701

    Click the link to respond:
    Does "Additional Length" for the Lead Screw mean Additional Length in inches? So for the 4' x-axis I have to choose Additional Length=52?

  • I am looking at purchasing the greenbull 5X system with the laser/spindle combination. Can the laser do both rastered engraving as well as vectored cutting with the same breakout board and software? If I have this wrong please let me know what would be needed to accompish this.

    You can do raster and vector engraving on the greenBull laser/spindle combination. The methods of this process is not accomplished in the same way as the typical laser machines where CorelDRAW is used. The Mach3 laser plug-in can be used for the raster engraving and standard CNC g-code can be used for vector cutting and engraving.

    The raster method will not be fast on the greenBull since the z-axis is heavy and there are inertial limitation on doing fast raster back and forth movement. Vector is the best use of this machine.

    Click the link to respond:
    I am looking at purchasing the greenbull 5X system with the laser/spindle combination. Can the laser do both rastered engraving as well as vectored cutting with the same breakout board and software? If I have this wrong please let me know what would be needed to accompish this.

  • hello there, i am using servo motor for my X and Y Axis but i dont know how to calculate steps/mm for that, the lead screw i am using is have pitch of .5 mm. please helpme on this i have done everything only this point is pending.

    The formula for finding the steps per mm is found in the units itself. First, you mentioned that the motor is a servo. This needs to be clarified as a servo is different than a stepper motor. Some servos behave similar to a stepper motor, so I will continue with this in mind.

    The formula is (steps/mm):

    You need to find the steps. The stepper motor has a natural number of steps per a full revolution. This is typically 200 steps per revolution.

    The driver for the stepper motor allows you to increase the number of steps per revolution by adding a specified number of steps between each step. For instance, if you set the driver to 1/4 microstepping, then instead of having 200 steps per revolution, you would have 200 x 4 = 800 steps per revolution.

    So now we have the first part of the formula:

    Steps / mm = (200 x 4) / mm

    Lets determine the mm side of the formula:

    You mention that the pitch is 0.5 mm. Check to insure that the lead is also 0.5 mm. This could be a multiple start lead screw where the pitch is different than the turns per mm. If in this case, that the 0.5 mm is the travel for one full revolution, then you can simply plug this into the formula as:

    mm = .5 mm

    Otherwise, determine how fat the travel is for one complete revolution.

    Therefor, with what we know and the driver is set at 1/4 microstepping and the stepper motor has a natural step count per revolution at 200:

    steps / mm = (200 steps x 4) / 0.5 mm = 800 steps / 0.5 mm = 1600 steps / mm

    If your travel for one revolution is not 0.5 mm, then plug in your travel distance instead.



    Additional Information:
    i know about steps/mm calculation for stepper motor, because i am using servo motor that why i asked about that. please tell for servo motor.

    Additional Information:
    because its my first time with servo motor i have no idea about calculation of parameter with servo.

    Additional Information:
    Have you attempted to contact the manufacturer or seller of the servo? We typically respond to customers of our products on this customer service area, unless we have extensive knowledge of the subject and can answer the question efficiently.

    Click the link to respond:
    hello there, i am using servo motor for my X and Y Axis but i dont know how to calculate steps/mm for that, the lead screw i am using is have pitch of .5 mm. please helpme on this i have done everything only this point is pending.

  • thank you for the reply. I would be really good to know the calculation. The lead screw is 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI. Please provide the calculation for determing the maximum weight motor can handle on Z-axis on book build cnc. And one more question. If I am cutting 18mm MDF with 6mm cutting bit (so 6mm pass), what can be the maximum speed rate of cutting and spindle speed of router? thank you

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    thank you for the reply. I would be really good to know the calculation. The lead screw is 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI. Please provide the calculation for determing the maximum weight motor can handle on Z-axis on book build cnc. And one more question. If I am cutting 18mm MDF with 6mm cutting bit (so 6mm pass), what can be the maximum speed rate of cutting and spindle speed of router? thank you

  • I would like some longer HIWIN rails and ballscrews for my x-axis, 9 feet or 108 inches. You list maximums as 78 inches.

    Yes, however, if you are needing a length of the HIWIN specification rail longer than our 78" max length, then you can abut more than one rail together to increase the length of the rail. We do this for our long X-Axis travels on our Fabricator pro machine.

    Click the link to respond:
    I would like some longer HIWIN rails and ballscrews for my x-axis, 9 feet or 108 inches. You list maximums as 78 inches.

  • I am interested in buying Laser Cutter/Engraver with Integrated Computer, so can you please let me know if your offer still stands?

    The (blackTooth) laser cutter and engraver comes with the unit shown on the product page seen here: https://buildyourcnc.com/blackToothLaserCutterAndEngraver.aspx

    The unit is intended to be set on a table top.

    The stand that you may have noticed was only a demonstration on how to use SketchUP in a CNC process scenario. The stand has never been offered with the blackTooth laser.

    Click the link to respond:
    I am interested in buying Laser Cutter/Engraver with Integrated Computer, so can you please let me know if your offer still stands?

  • Hi Guys, I just received an order for some cable and realized the moment it arrived that I Miss-ordered. I ordered 8 wire instead of 4 wire. Can I exchange?

    Certainly. The easiest way to process this and get you the correct item, re-order the new item and go ahead and send the mis-ordered item back with a note that you would like a refund for this order.

    If time is not a factor for you but you don't want to be out-of-pocket, then simply send the item back (with a note that you need a refund) and you can re-order after the refund is made.

    Click the link to respond:
    Hi Guys, I just received an order for some cable and realized the moment it arrived that I Miss-ordered. I ordered 8 wire instead of 4 wire. Can I exchange?