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Question #: 6880

Question: I am trying to build a cutoff saw adjustable fence belt driven i need a linear rail 8 feet long it has a min. working load suggestions?

Current Solution

Are you specifically asking for the axial load, or load on the mechanics which will drive the fence by the stepper/servo motor?

Respond:

Other Possible Solutions to this Question

  • What are the hole spacing dimensions for the Linear Guide Rail 20mm? I'm trying to figure out what size aluminum extrusion to purchase so I can mount these to it.

    Our SBR20 rails use M8 bolts and are suitable for use with 8020 aluminum or any other common machine material. We suggest the use of our ball bearing pillow blocks with these rails, which you can find on our website here: https://buildyourcnc.com/item/mechanical-rails-linear-ball-bearing-block

    Additional Information:
    HOW TO FIND WIDH 38 HEIGHT 26 LINER GUIDE RAIL

    Click the link to respond:
    What are the hole spacing dimensions for the Linear Guide Rail 20mm? I'm trying to figure out what size aluminum extrusion to purchase so I can mount these to it.

  • Is the machining on the ends of these rails good enough to allow them to be aligned to build longer tracks? https://buildyourcnc.com/item/mechanical-rails-linear-guide-rails-20mm

    Absolutely. You can create a machine as long as reasonable to carry electric signals to the gantry. The mechanical parts, like the rails and motion transmission are less of a factor. One exception is lead screw will not be able to extend very far, but if you use roller chain or rack and pinion, you will have no problem making very long machines.

    Additional Information:
    We also put the rails mentioned end to end without any issues.

    Click the link to respond:
    Is the machining on the ends of these rails good enough to allow them to be aligned to build longer tracks? https://buildyourcnc.com/item/mechanical-rails-linear-guide-rails-20mm

  • I am working with a Spur gear that has a 15 tooth 3/8 bore/ 3/8 wide....is the 651ozin stepper motor compatible with this or do I need to get a different motor
  • Requirement of laser cutting CNC Router having working area: 100cm x 100cm x 300cm, Belt driven motion, servo motor controller

    This is an open ended question to which there could be many possible answers.

    The requirement of a laser cutter is having a laser with enough energy output to cut the intended material. Generally, the laser function is not tied to the working area unless the laser tube is stationary, where the farther the beam has to travel, the less energy results at the intended area (on the surface of the material).

    We don't use servo motors here. Rather, we use precision stepping motors instead.
    https://buildyourcnc.com/category/nema

    We do offer timing belts.
    https://buildyourcnc.com/category/pulley

    Our blackTooth Laser Cutter:
    https://buildyourcnc.com/blackToothLaserCutterAndEngraver.aspx

    Our greenBull Leaser/Spindle Head:
    The CNC Machine: https://buildyourcnc.com/greenBullCNCMachineKit.aspx
    The Laser/Spindle Head: https://buildyourcnc.com/item/cnc-machine-laser-spindle-combo-head

    Click the link to respond:
    Requirement of laser cutting CNC Router having working area: 100cm x 100cm x 300cm, Belt driven motion, servo motor controller

  • I am getting that radus error in Mach3 and changing my IJ setting is not working. Any suggestions?

    What is the actual error that you are seeing in Mach3 and what CAM program are you using? Did you try installing a later version of Mach3 if your's is an earlier version? What post-processing setting are you using in your CAM program?

    Click the link to respond:
    I am getting that radus error in Mach3 and changing my IJ setting is not working. Any suggestions?

  • IF I PURCHASE A GREENBULL 6X LONG Z CNC MACHINE KIT AND MACH3, WHAT ELSE WOULD BE REQUIRED TO ASSEMBLE THE WORKING MACHINE? HAVE CAD SOFTWARE.

    You will need to build the table unit for your machine. There are instructions on how to do this at the bottom of the product page here, https://www.buildyourcnc.com/Item/cnc-machine-blackFoot-v4
    There is no estimate on how much this will cost though, since there are too many variables involved to do this.

    - PC with parallel port and USB port
    - 20awg stranded wires for the motors - http://www.buildyourcnc.com/electronicscombo.aspx
    - 18awg stranded wires for power supply to drivers
    - 24awg stranded wires for breakout board to drivers
    (location and spacing of components varies from one person to another, so we do not provide cables/wires)
    - General purpose extension cord (cut the female end off) to provide power to power supply
    - USB cable to power breakout board
    - Parallel cable to communicate to breakout board
    - Router
    - (optional - instead of router) Spindle with power inverter http://www.buildyourcnc.com/SpindlesAndAccessories.aspx
    - (if purchasing spindle with inverter) General purpose extension cord (240v) (cut the female end off) to provide power to power inverter
    - End Mill(s) http://www.buildyourcnc.com/ProductsEndMills.aspx
    - CAD, and/or CAD-CAM software (to produce geometry, machine operations, and g-code) http://www.buildyourcnc.com/CNCsoftware.aspx
    - CNC control software (to read g-code and control machine) http://www.buildyourcnc.com/CNCsoftware.aspx

    This answer is applicable to most of our machines with the exception of the greenLean and the blueChick since those machines are equipped with a table structure.

    Click the link to respond:
    IF I PURCHASE A GREENBULL 6X LONG Z CNC MACHINE KIT AND MACH3, WHAT ELSE WOULD BE REQUIRED TO ASSEMBLE THE WORKING MACHINE? HAVE CAD SOFTWARE.

  • If I purchase a greenBull 6X Long Z CNC Machine Kit and Mach3, what else would be required to assemble the working machine? I have CAD software.

    You will need to build the table unit for your machine. There are instructions on how to do this at the bottom of the product page here, https://www.buildyourcnc.com/Item/cnc-machine-blackFoot-v4
    There is no estimate on how much this will cost though, since there are too many variables involved to do this.

    - PC with parallel port and USB port
    - 20awg stranded wires for the motors - http://www.buildyourcnc.com/electronicscombo.aspx
    - 18awg stranded wires for power supply to drivers
    - 24awg stranded wires for breakout board to drivers
    (location and spacing of components varies from one person to another, so we do not provide cables/wires)
    - General purpose extension cord (cut the female end off) to provide power to power supply
    - USB cable to power breakout board
    - Parallel cable to communicate to breakout board
    - Router
    - (optional - instead of router) Spindle with power inverter http://www.buildyourcnc.com/SpindlesAndAccessories.aspx
    - (if purchasing spindle with inverter) General purpose extension cord (240v) (cut the female end off) to provide power to power inverter
    - End Mill(s) http://www.buildyourcnc.com/ProductsEndMills.aspx
    - CAD, and/or CAD-CAM software (to produce geometry, machine operations, and g-code) http://www.buildyourcnc.com/CNCsoftware.aspx
    - CNC control software (to read g-code and control machine) http://www.buildyourcnc.com/CNCsoftware.aspx

    This answer is applicable to most of our machines with the exception of the greenLean and the blueChick since those machines are equipped with a table structure.

    Click the link to respond:
    If I purchase a greenBull 6X Long Z CNC Machine Kit and Mach3, what else would be required to assemble the working machine? I have CAD software.

  • I have a Nema 34 motor (Z axis) it was working perfect but suddenly changes direction when jogging, I already try changing another motor to Z axis but problem persist in spite of following all suggestions, what can I do?

    If the z-axis motor changes directions when jogging, and continues even when replacing the motor! It seems as it is either a wiring problem or the driver? I would recommend changing the z-axis driver and check the wiring going form the driver to the breakout board.
    If problem continues please contact us at customerservice@buildyourcnc.com


    Additional Information:
    z axis soft limit at 7line

    Additional Information:
    z axis soft limit at 7line

    Additional Information:
    z axis soft limit at 7 line

    Additional Information:
    z axis soft limit at 7 line

    Click the link to respond:
    I have a Nema 34 motor (Z axis) it was working perfect but suddenly changes direction when jogging, I already try changing another motor to Z axis but problem persist in spite of following all suggestions, what can I do?

  • I am building a cnc router with twin ball screws on the long axis and I will have a rotary axis as well. I need a 5 axis breaker board using only 4 axis total. Can you help me?

    Yes, we can make a redLeaf system that has all 6A drivers for use with the 651 oz-in motors. We can also wire the electronics in a way that two of the drivers will use the pins of the same axis so that axis will drive two drivers and motors.

    Click the link to respond:
    I am building a cnc router with twin ball screws on the long axis and I will have a rotary axis as well. I need a 5 axis breaker board using only 4 axis total. Can you help me?

  • I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can lift using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can lift using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

  • IS THE "#25 ROLLER CHAIN" ADJUSTABLE TO ANY LENGTH? LIKE IF I ORDERED TEN FEET OF IT, CAN MAKE TWO 3-FOOT LOOPS AND ONE 4-FOOT LOOP USING SOME SORT CHAIN JOINER?

    Roller chain in general is adjustable by using "master links", which are links which have horseshoe clip holding the pin and thus allow connections to be made or broken. The #25 is a designation of the type of roller chain. ANSI codes designate that the first digit(s) specify the pitch in eights of an inch, and the last digit is 0 for standard chain, 1 for lightweight chain, and 5 for bushed chain with no rollers. So #25 is 2/8 = 1/4 inch pitch bushed chain with no rollers.

    Click the link to respond:
    IS THE "#25 ROLLER CHAIN" ADJUSTABLE TO ANY LENGTH? LIKE IF I ORDERED TEN FEET OF IT, CAN MAKE TWO 3-FOOT LOOPS AND ONE 4-FOOT LOOP USING SOME SORT CHAIN JOINER?

  • Is the "#25 Roller Chain" adjustable to any length? Like if I ordered ten feet of it, can I make two 3-foot loops and one 4-foot loop using some sort of chain joiner?

    Roller chain in general is adjustable by using "master links", which are links which have horseshoe clip holding the pin and thus allow connections to be made or broken. The #25 is a designation of the type of roller chain. ANSI codes designate that the first digit(s) specify the pitch in eights of an inch, and the last digit is 0 for standard chain, 1 for lightweight chain, and 5 for bushed chain with no rollers. So #25 is 2/8 = 1/4 inch pitch bushed chain with no rollers.

    Click the link to respond:
    Is the "#25 Roller Chain" adjustable to any length? Like if I ordered ten feet of it, can I make two 3-foot loops and one 4-foot loop using some sort of chain joiner?

  • How to determine lead screw length needed. My Thomson 1 1:4 rails are 60 inches long roughly for the router I’m building. I know I have to have it long enough to couple up with the stepper motor of course but does it matter if it’s a little long on the other end

    It generally does not matter if it is longer at the other end as long as the lead screw provides the desired travel for that axis. The lead screw will only need to be long enough for the travel, plus any structure and lead-nut positioning.

    For example:
    - The motor that will turn the lead screw will need to be mounted at some position (generally at one end of the axis). In many cases, this positioning will be mounted where some of the lead screw will not be used (the lead nut will not be able to moved close to the coupling of the lead screw to the motor shaft). Add some of the length of the lead screw to be inserted into the coupling.

    - If the lead screw will contain bearings at either end of the travel, that portion of the mechanical assembly will need to be considered in the lead screw length.

    - The lead-nut will need to be mounted in a position on a structural member of the part that is to move. The distance from the part of the structure that will extend closest to the motor will have some distance to the position of the lead nut. This distance will need to be added to the lead screw length.

    Add these discrepancies to the length of the lead screw and the travel length and you will have the final length.

    Click the link to respond:
    How to determine lead screw length needed. My Thomson 1 1:4 rails are 60 inches long roughly for the router I’m building. I know I have to have it long enough to couple up with the stepper motor of course but does it matter if it’s a little long on the other end

  • I had to wipe my computer due to virus and now can not download the USB software again. I get a "unhandled exception" error message. Any suggestions?

    An unhandled exception generally means that, in the program code, the program is not checking against every possible exception that could occur. Most likely, this exception is caused by some limit that is being exceeded (or the other way around). I would remove any files that could be associated with the program, like setting files, or even register configurations associated with that software. Also, make sure that you completely update your version of windows.

    Check to make sure all of the drivers are current for your graphics hardware. Make sure that your graphics hardware works in other programs as well.

    If you upgraded the Windows version, check to make sure your graphics hardware is compatible with the new version of Windows. Unhandled exception issue may be associated with graphics hardware and compatibility.

    Customer Response:
    I've given up on the wiped laptop and loaded the program on a different computer using windows 8. At first it won't operate my CNC until I read on Planet-CNC forum about loading the drivers on windows 8. All working now. Will run through the calibrations again today. Thanks

    Click the link to respond:
    I had to wipe my computer due to virus and now can not download the USB software again. I get a "unhandled exception" error message. Any suggestions?

  • I purchased Mach3 from buildyourcnc dont know what verson i need to use in VCarve as the processor. There are 8 2/3Mach listed

    You will probably have post processors like the following listed:
    Mach2/3 ATC Arcs (inch)
    Mach2/3 ATC Arcs (mm)
    Mach2/3 Arcs (inch)
    Mach2/3 Arcs (mm)
    Mach2/3-WrapX2A ATC Arcs (inch)
    Mach2/3-WrapX2A ATC Arcs (mm)
    Mach2/3-WrapY2A ATC Arcs (inch)
    Mach2/3-WrapY2A ATC Arcs (mm)

    If you have an Automatic Tool Changer, use the post processor with the ATC in the name. For most applications and if you don't have an ATC (automatic tool changer), use the Mach2/3 Arcs (inch) or (mm) post processor.

    Click the link to respond:
    I purchased Mach3 from buildyourcnc dont know what verson i need to use in VCarve as the processor. There are 8 2/3Mach listed

  • Would your greenBull 6X CNC machine be suitable for cutting 2024T3 aircraft aluminium? Working on a kitlpane project and I need this capability.

    the greenBull can handle cutting aluminum as long as the correct bit (end mill) is used and the bit is cooled frequently to prevent chips from melting and causing damage to the bit or warping the material.

    Click the link to respond:
    Would your greenBull 6X CNC machine be suitable for cutting 2024T3 aircraft aluminium? Working on a kitlpane project and I need this capability.

  • I am building the Blacktooth with integrated computer, which consists of a motherboard and hard drive. Does the hard drive need to be formatted or any form of OS loaded onto the integrated computer?

    For the integrated computer for the blackTooth, the hard drive doe not need to be formatted, but will require an OS (operating system) to be installed. Ubuntu Linux can be installed with the CNC integrated software from Linuxcnc.org. Windows can also be installed.

    Click the link to respond:
    I am building the Blacktooth with integrated computer, which consists of a motherboard and hard drive. Does the hard drive need to be formatted or any form of OS loaded onto the integrated computer?

  • I am planning to build a scratch CNC machine to do rotary engraving on writing pens. Can you recommend the parts I would need? I'm thinking NEMA 14 (11?) and 3/8" acme rod. Not sure which linear motion to use. I have an old lathe to use for the 4th axis.

    Consider the loads on each axis when choosing appropriate stepper motors. If your holding torque is maxed out at roughly 16oz/in (1lb/in), then you could use the NEMA 11 or 14. Also consider the shaft sizes and current ratings when choosing drivers that pair with the motors.

    Click the link to respond:
    I am planning to build a scratch CNC machine to do rotary engraving on writing pens. Can you recommend the parts I would need? I'm thinking NEMA 14 (11?) and 3/8" acme rod. Not sure which linear motion to use. I have an old lathe to use for the 4th axis.

  • I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.

    There are two main questions that we can answer with respect to motor torque and the mechanical advantage of lead screws, 1) What torque motor do you need to lift a particular weight, or 2) What maximum weight will my motor torque be able to lift.

    This formula uses Newtons (N) as it's final unit. Use this with the included radius (R) to determine the torque. Newtons can easily be converted to lbs or ounces using online conversions.

    Effort = Sf + (Load/(2 x pi x (R/p) x Se))

    where:
    p = pitch of the screw
    Se = screw efficiency = Standard lead screw will be between 20% (.2) and 40% (.4)
    Sf = static force. This is the force that is needed to start the movement. The number may be eliminated, but it is good to use a number in the 5 N to 20 N range.
    Load = the expected load that the effort will need to carry (i.e., the router and the included axis assembly that the motor will need to lift)
    R = radius of the lead screw


    This formula is based on the "law of the machine"

    The final effort amount with its unit of newtons and R will be the torque. For example, if the effort comes to 100 N (newtons) and the R is .5 inches, then you can assume that the effort is 50 N-in since it would take twice the effort to turn form the one inch mark from the center of the shaft.

    Example:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 13 = .08 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .08) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 12.5 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (15.7))
    Effort = 5 N + (5.73 N)
    Effort = 10.7 N = 2.4 lbs = 38.4 oz-in

    I am putting the oz-in on the end because the formula considers the distance from the center of the shaft to be one inch.

    Therefore, a 425 oz-in motor would be able to lift a 20.2 lb Router with its accompanying assembly. If the assembly and router is heavier, plug in the numbers and determine the effort required.

    With a bit of algebra, the formula can be rewritten to find the load:

    Load = (Effort - Sf) x (2 x pi x (R/p) x Se)

    Another formula that does not consider friction at all:

    Effort = (Load x p) / (2 x pi x R)

    Lets see if we get similar results:

    Effort = (20 lb x .08 inches) / (2 x 3.14 x 1)
    Effort = 1.6 / 6.28 = .255 lbs = 4.08 oz-in

    The results from both formulas appear to be very small because a 13 TPI screw will have enormous mechanical advantage.

    It is evident that the first formula that does consider friction that we are loosely estimating is far more conservative than the second formula. Either way, even the most conservative formula shows that the 425 oz-in motor will handle very large weights. If you are using a lead screw with only two turns per inch, .5 inch pitch, you can determine the requirements with the first formula.

    Example for a 10 TPI 5 start (2 turns per inch) lead screw:

    Load = 90 N (20.2 lbs)
    R = 1 inch since that is the length from the center of the shaft that the motor is rated
    p = 1 inch / 2 = .5 inches

    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2 x 3.14 x (1 / .5) x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (6.28 x 2 x .2))
    Effort = 5 N + (90 N / (2.512))
    Effort = 5 N + (35.83 N)
    Effort = 40.828 N = 9.18 lbs = 146.88 oz-in

    Customer Response:
    thank you so much

    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:


    Additional Information:
    how do i calculate torque of stepper motor if lead screw coupled to motor shaft and load applied by lead screw on plate is 100 kg by vertically

    Additional Information:
    Pls


    Additional Information:
    1m 16mmdiameter ball screws calculations

    Click the link to respond:
    I need the calculation to determine the stepper motor torque to find the load that it can withstand in horizontal position using a lead screw at 1/2" diameter with 13 TPI.